International Law Digest (3)

August 21, 2017 | Author: Dinah Pearl Campos | Category: Treaty, Ratification, Standing (Law), United States Senate, International Law
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Table of Contents Chapter 1: The Nature of International Law Chapter 2: The Sources of International Law Chapter 3: The Law of Treaties The making of treaties Application of treaties CASE CONCERNING THE TEMPLE OF PREAH VIHEAR…..5 Invalidity of treaties Termination of treaties Rebus sic stantibus FISHERIES JURISDICTION CASE……………………………..8 NAMIBIA CASE………………………………………………...10 DANUBE DAM CASE………………………………………….12 UNITED KINGDOM V ICELAND……………………………..14 Chapter 4: International Law and Municipal Law International law in domestic law Conflict between international law and domestic law: international rule VFA CASES……………………………………………………..16 Municipal rule HEAD MONEY CASES………………………………………...24 WHITNEY V ROBERTSON……………………………………26 Chapter 5: Subjects of International Law States Territory PRINCIPALITY OF SEALAND………………………………..28 Recognition of states INTERNATIONAL STATUS OF SOUTH WEST AFRICA…..34 Recognition of government THE TINOCO ARBITRATION…………………………………38 UPRIGHT V MERCURY BUSINESS MACHINES CO…….…41 Chapter 6: Jurisdiction Over Territory Modes of acquisition of sovereignty over territory Discovery and occupation WESTERN SAHARA CASE……………………………………43 THE ISLAND OF PALMAS CASE…………………………….49 LEGAL STATUS OF EASTERN GREENLAND CASE……….51 Outer space

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SKYLAB PROJECT……………………………………………..53 Chapter 7: Law of the Sea The continental (archipelagic) shelf NORTH SEA CONTINENTAL SHELF CASES………………55 Chapter 8: Jurisdiction of States The Territoriality Principle CORFU CHANNEL CASE………………………………..…….57 Effects Doctrine THE LOTUS CASE……………………………………………...61 TRAIL SMELTER ARBITRATION……………………………63 The Nationality Principle BLACKMER V UNITED STATES……………………………..65 Effective nationality link THE NOTTEBOHM CASE……………………………………..66 THE ASYLUM CASE…………………………………………...69 Stateless persons MEJOFF V DIRECTOR OF PRISONS…………………………72 The Universality Principle FILARTIGA V PEÑA-IRALA…………………………………..73 THE EICHMANN CASE………………………………………..74 The Passive Personality Principle UNITED STATES V FAWAZ YUNIS………………………….76 Conflicts of jurisdiction UNITED STATES V AH SING…………………………………77 Extradition UNITED STATES V ALVAREZ-MACHAIN………………….78 SEC. OF JUSTICE V HON. RALPH C. LANTION……………79 KER V PEOPLE OF STATE OF ILLINOIS……………………81 Chapter 9: Immunity from Jurisdiction Immunity from jurisdiction THE HOLY SEE V THE HON. ERIBERTO U. ROSARIO, JR..83 Immunity of Head of State THE PINOCHET CASE…………………………………………88 Diplomatic immunities KHOSROW MINUCHER V CA………………………………..93 THE REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA V. VINZON…………….…96 Consuls and consular immunities US DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR STAFF IN TEHRAN CASE…………………………………………98 Immunity of International Organization JEFFREY LIANG (HEUFENG) v. PEOPLE OF THE PHILIPPINES…………………………………………100 The Act of State Doctrine CASE CONCERNING THE TEMPLE OF PREAH VIHEAR..101

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Chapter 10: State Responsibility Protection of Aliens Corporations and shareholders CASE CONCERNING THE BARCELONA TRACTION, LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY, LIMITED……….105 Attribution to the State Acts of state organs CAIRE CLAIM………………………………………………..107 CORFU CHANNEL CASE……………………………….. …..109 Acts of other persons UNITED STATES V IRAN………………..…………………113 Acts of revolutionaries HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY CLAIM……………………115 SHORT V IRAN…………………………………………….…116 Reparation CHORZOW FACTORY CASE………………………………117 Chapter 11: International Human Rights Law The covenant on civil and political rights Freedom of Movement LEGAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF A WALL IN THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY…………………………………………...119 Self-determination of peoples LEGAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF A WALL IN THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY…………………………………………...119 Chapter 12: International Organizations Immunities REPARATION FOR INJURIES SUFFERED IN THE SERVICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS…………………….……121 The United Nations: structure and powers ECOSOC INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL ALLIANCE OF EDUCATORS V QUISUMBING, ET.AL………………………………...123 Chapter 13: Peaceful Settlement of International Dispute Jurisdiction of the ICJ: Contentious jurisdiction AERIAL INCIDENT OD 27 JULY 1955……………………...125 CASE CONCERNING EAST TIMOR…………………...……128 Provisional measures NICARAGUA V UNITED STATES…………………………..130

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CASE

CONCERNING LEGALITY OF THE USE OF FORCE………………………………………………….132

Intervention EL SALVADOR V HONDURAS……………………………...134 Chapter 14: The Use of Force Short of War The threat of force LEGALITY OF THE THREAT OR USE OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS………………………..……………………135 Traditionally allowable coercive measures Reprisals NAULILAA CASE: GERMANY V PORTUGAL……………………………………...…….140 Chapter 15: War and Neutrality Customary and conventional law Commencement and termination of hostilities THE CAROLINE INCIDENT DURING THE PATRIOT WAR…………………………………………………....141 Methods of Warfare The Soldier’s Rules COMPAGNIE DE COMMERCE ET DE NAVIGATION D'EXTREME ORIENT V THE HAMBURG AMERIKA PACKETFACHT ACTIEN GESELLSCHAFT…………………………………...…143 Chapter 16: International Environmental Law Chapter 17: International Economic Law Exceptions to key principles TAÑADA V ANGARA………………………………...………146

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Chapter 1: The Nature of International Law Chapter 2: The Sources of International Law Chapter 3: The Law of Treaties CASE CONCERNING THE TEMPLE OF PREAH VIHEAR (Merits) Judgment of 15 June 1962 The subject of the dispute between Government of Cambodia and the Government of Thailand was sovereignty of the region of the Temple of Preah Vihear. This ancient sanctuary, partially in ruins, stood on a promontory of the Dangrek range of mountains which constituted the boundary between Cambodia and Thailand. The dispute had its fons et origo in the boundary settlements made in the period 1904-1908 between France, then conducting the foreign relations of Indo-China, and Siam. The application of the Treaty of 13 February 1904 was, in particular, involved. That Treaty established the general character of the frontier the exact boundary of which was to be delimited by a Franco-Siamese Mixed Commission. In the eastern sector of the Dangrek range, in which Preah Vihear was situated, the frontier was to follow the watershed line. For the purpose of delimiting that frontier, it was agreed, at a meeting held on 2 December 1906, that the Mixed Commission should travel along the Dangrek range carrying out all the necessary reconnaissance, and that a survey officer of the French section of the Commission should survey the whole of the eastern part of the range. It had not been contested that the Presidents of the French and Siamese sections duly made this journey, in the course of which they visited the Temple of Preah Vihear. In January-February 1907, the President of the French section had reported to his Government that the frontier-line had been definitely established. It therefore seemed clear that a frontier had been surveyed and fixed, although there was no record of any decision and no reference to the Dangrek region in any minutes of the meetings of the Commission after 2 December 1906. Moreover, at the time when the Commission might have met for the purpose of winding up its work, attention was directed towards the conclusion of a further Franco-Siamese boundary treaty, the Treaty of 23 March 1907. The final stage of the delimitation was the preparation of maps. The Siamese Government, which did not dispose of adequate technical means, had requested that

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French officers should map the frontier region. These maps were completed in the autumn of 1907 by a team of French officers, some of whom had been members of the Mixed Commission, and they were communicated to the Siamese Government in 1908. Amongst them was a map of the Dangrek range showing Preah Vihear on the Cambodian side. It was on that map (filed as Annex I to its Memorial) that Cambodia had principally relied in support of her claim to sovereignty over the Temple. Thailand, on the other hand, had contended that the map, not being the work of the Mixed Commission, had no binding character; that the frontier indicated on it was not the true watershed line and that the true watershed line would place the Temple in Thailand, that the map had never been accepted by Thailand or, alternatively, that if Thailand had accepted it she had done so only because of a mistaken belief that the frontier indicated corresponded with the watershed line. The Annex I map was never formally approved by the Mixed Commission, which had ceased to function some months before its production. While there could be no reasonable doubt that it was based on the work of the surveying officers in the Dangrek sector, the Court nevertheless concluded that, in its inception, it had no binding character. It was clear from the record, however, that the maps were communicated to the Siamese Government as purporting to represent the outcome of the work of delimitation; since there was no reaction on the part of the Siamese authorities, either then or for many years, they must be held to have acquiesced. The maps were moreover communicated to the Siamese members of the Mixed Commission, who said nothing. to the Siamese Minister of the Interior, Prince Damrong, who thanked the French Minister in Bangkok for them, and to the Siamese provincial governors, some of whom knew of Preah Vihear. If the Siamese authorities accepted the Annex I map without investigation, they could not now plead any error vitiating the reality of their consent. The Siamese Government and later the Thai Government had raised no query about the Annex I map prior to its negotiations with Cambodia in Bangkok in 1958. But in 1934-1935 a survey had established a divergence between the map line and the true line of the watershed, and other maps had been produced showing the Temple as being in Thailand: Thailand had nevertheless continued also to use and indeed to publish maps showing Preah Vihear as lying in Cambodia. Moreover, in the course of the negotiations for the 1925 and 1937 Franco-Siamese Treaties, which confirmed the existing frontiers, and in 1947 in Washington before the Franco-Siamese Conciliation Commission, it would have been natural for Thailand to raise the matter: she did not do so. The natural inference was that she had accepted the frontier at Preah Vihear as it was drawn on the map, irrespective of its correspondence with the watershed line. Thailand had stated that having been, at all material times, in possession of Preah Vihear, she had had no need to raise the matter; she had indeed instanced the acts of her administrative authorities on the ground as evidence that she had never accepted the Annex I line at Preah Vihear. But the Court found it difficult to regard such local acts as negativing the consistent attitude of the central authorities. Moreover, when in 1930 Prince Damrong, on a visit to the Temple, was officially received there by the French Resident for the adjoining Cambodian province, Siam failed to react.

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The issue is whether or not Thailand had accepted the Annex I map by its failure to object to the map and its continued use of the map thereby granting sovereignty to Cambodia over Preah Vihear. From the facts, the court concluded that Thailand had accepted the Annex I map. Even if there were any doubt in this connection, Thailand was not precluded from asserting that she had not accepted it since France and Cambodia had relied upon her acceptance and she had for fifty years enjoyed such benefits as the Treaty of 1904 has conferred on her. Furthermore, the acceptance of the Annex I map caused it to enter the treaty settlement; the Parties had at that time adopted an interpretation of that settlement which caused the map line to prevail over the provisions of the Treaty and, as there was no reason to think that the Parties had attached any special importance to the line of the watershed as such, as compared with the overriding importance of a final regulation of their own frontiers, the Court considered that the interpretation to be given now would be the same. The Court therefore felt bound to pronounce in favor of the frontier indicated on the Annex I map in the disputed area and it became unnecessary to consider whether the line as mapped did in fact correspond to the true watershed line. For these reasons, the Court upheld the submissions of Cambodia concerning sovereignty over Preah Vihear.

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FISHERIES CASE (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland vs. Norway) In past centuries, British fishermen had made incursions in the waters near the Norwegian coast. As a result of complains from the King of Norway, the British abstained from doing so at the beginning of the 17th century and for 300 years. But in 1906, British vessels appeared again. These were trawlers equipped with improved and powerful gears. The local population became perturbed and measures were taken by Norway with a view to specifying the limits within which fishing was prohibited to foreigners. Incidents occurred, became more frequent, and on July 12, 1935, the Norwegian Government delimited the Norwegian fisheries zone by Decree. Negotiations had been entered into by the two Governments; they were pursued after the Decree was enacted, but without success. A considerable number of British trawlers were arrested and condemned in 1948 and 1949. It was then that the United Kingdom Government instituted proceedings before the Court. The coastal zone concerned in the dispute is of a distinctive configuration. Its length exceeds 1,500 kilometers. Mountainous along its whole length broken by fjords and bays, dotted with countless islands, islets and reefs. The coast does not constitute a clear dividing line between land and sea. The land configuration stretches out into the sea and what really constitutes the Norwegian coastline is the outer line of the formations viewed as a whole. Along the coastal zone are situated shallow banks which are very rich in fish. These have been exploited from time immemorial by the inhabitants of the mainland and of the islands; they derive their livelihood essentially from such fishing. The United Kingdom Government asked the Court to state whether the lines laid down by the 1935 Decree for the purpose of delimitating the Norwegian fisheries zone have or have not been drawn in accordance with international low-water mark. Rule has not acquired the authority of a general rule of international ional law. The principle put forward by the United Kingdom is that the base-line must be the low-water mark. This is the criterion generally adopted in the practices of States. The parties agree to this criterion but the conclusion that the relevant line is not that of the mainland, but rather that of the “skjaergaard”, also lead to the rejection of the requirement that the base-line should always follow law, neither in respect of bays nor the waters separating the islands of an archipelago. Furthermore, ten-mile rule is inapplicable as against Norway inasmuch as she has always historically opposed its application to the Norwegian coast. Norway argued that the 1935 Decree is an application of a traditional system of delimitation in accordance with international law. In its view, international law takes into

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account the diversity of acts and concedes that the delimitation must be adapted to the special conditions obtaining in different regions. A Norwegian Decree in 1812, as well as a number of subsequent texts shows that the method of straight lines, imposed by geography, has been established in the Norwegian system and consolidated by a constant and sufficient long practice. The application of this system encountered no opposition from other States. Even the United Kingdom did not contest it for many years; it was only in 1933 that the United Kingdom made formal and definite protest. The general toleration of the international community therefore shows that the Norwegian system was not regarded as contrary to international law. For these reasons, the Court concluded that the method employed by the Decree of 1935 is not contrary to international law; and that the base-lines fixed by the Decree are not contrary to international law either.

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NAMIBIA CASE (Advisory Opinion) 1971 I.C.J. 16 ***Legal consequences for States of the Continued Presence of South Africa in Namibia (South Africa) notwithstanding Security Council Resolution 276 (1970).*** On 27 October 1966, the General Assembly decided that the mandate for South West Africa was terminated and that South Africa had no other right to administer the Territory. In 1969 the Security Council called upon South Africa to withdraw its administration from the Territory, and on 30 January 1970 it declared that the continued presence there of the South African authorities was illegal and that all acts taken by the South African Government on behalf of or concerning Namibia after the termination of the mandate were illegal and invalid; it further called upon all States to refrain from any dealings with the South African Government that were incompatible with that declaration. On 29 July 1970, the Security Council decided to request of the Court an advisory opinion on the legal consequences for States of the continued presence of South Africa in Namibia. The issues to be resolved are: a.) Under international context, in the continued presence of South Africa in Namibia under the mandate system illegal despite the issuance of the Security Council Resolution 276? b.) If the answer is in the affirmative, what are the legal consequences of such fact? The Court said, the United Nations acting through its competent organ, must be seen above all as the supervisory institution competent to pronounce on the conduct of the Mandatory. As such the General Assembly of the United Nations, in terminating the Mandate of South Africa over Namibia, was not making a finding on facts, but formulating a legal situation. It would not be correct to assume that, because it is in principle vested with recommendatory powers, it is debarred from adopting, in special cases within the framework of its competence, resolutions which make determinations or have operative design. However, since the General Assembly lacked the necessary powers to ensure the withdrawal of South Africa from the Territory and therefore, acting in accordance with Article 11, paragraph 2, of the Charter, enlisted the co-operation of the Security Council. The Council for its part, when it adopted the resolutions concerned, was acting in the exercise of what it deemed to be its primary responsibility for the maintenance of peace and security. Article 24 of the Charter vests in the Security Council the necessary authority. Its decisions were taken in conformity with the purposes and principles of the

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Charter, under Article 25 of which it is for member States to comply with those decisions, even those members of the Security Council which voted against them and those Members of the United Nations who are not members of the Council. Thus, the determination made by the Security Council is binding upon South Africa, hence, its continued presence in Namibia is illegal and should withdraw its administration in Namibia immediately. Finding that the continued presence of South Africa in Namibia is illegal, the Court further found that the legal consequences of such act would be: (a) that State Members of the United Nations were under an obligation to recognize the illegality of South Africa's presence in Namibia and the invalidity of its acts on behalf of or concerning Namibia; and (b) to refrain from any acts implying recognition of the legality of, or lending support or assistance to, such presence and administration. Finally, it stated that it was incumbent upon States which were not Members of the United Nations to give assistance in the action which had been taken by the United Nations with regard to Namibia.

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DANUBE DAM CASE (Hungary v Slovakia) 37 ILM 162 (1998) In 1977, The Treaty between the Hungarian People’s Republic and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic concerning the Construction and Operation of the Gabcíkovo-Nagymaros System of Locks was concluded on 16 September 1977.The treaty was concluded to facilitate the construction of dams on the Danube River. It addressed broad utilization of the natural resources of the Danube between Bratislava and Budapest, representing two hundred of the River’s two thousand eight hundred and sixty kilometers. Intense criticism of the construction at Nagymaros centered upon endangerment of the environment and uncertainty of continued economic viability. This growing opposition engendered political pressures upon the Hungarian Government. After initiating two Protocols, primarily concerned with timing of construction, Hungary suspended works at Nagymaros on 21 July 1989 pending further environmental studies. In response, Czechoslovakia carried out unilateral measures. Hungary then claimed the right to terminate the treaty, at which point the dispute was submitted to the International Court of Justice. Hungary also submitted that it was entitled to terminate the treaty on the ground that Czechoslovakia had violated Articles of the Treaty by undertaking unilateral measures, culminating in the diversion of the Danube. Slovakia became a party to the 1977 Treaty as successor to Czechoslovakia. On 19 May 1992 Hungary purported to terminate the 1977 Treaty as a consequence of Czechoslovakia’s refusal to suspend work during the process of mediation. As the Treaty itself did not feature a clause governing termination, Hungary proffered five arguments to validate its actions: a state of necessity, supervening impossibility of performance, fundamental change of circumstances, material breach and the emergence of new norms of international environmental law. Slovakia contested each of these bases. The Court easily dismissed Hungary’s first claim, simply stating that a state of necessity is not a ground for termination. Even if a state of necessity is established, as soon as it ceases to exist treaty obligations automatically revive. The doctrine of impossibility of performance is encapsulated in Article 61 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, which requires the “permanent disappearance or destruction of an object indispensable for the execution of the treaty”. In this case, the legal regime governing the Gabcíkovo-Nagymaros Project did not cease to exist. Articles 15, 19 and 20 of the 1977 Treaty provided the means through which works could be readjusted in accordance with economic and ecological imperatives. Furthermore, Article 61(2) of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties precludes application of the doctrine where the impossibility complained of is the result of a breach by the

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terminating Party. If the joint investment had been hampered to a point where performance was impossible, it was a consequence of Hungary’s abandonment of works. Article 62 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties codifies international law in respect of fundamental change of circumstances and treaty relations. Hungary submitted that the 1977 Treaty was originally intended to be a vehicle for socialist integration. Fundamental changes cited were the displacement of a “single and indivisible operational system” by a unilateral scheme; the emergence of both States into a market economy; the mutation of a framework treaty into an immutable norm; and the transformation of a treaty consistent with environmental protection into “a prescription for environmental disaster”. The Court held that although political changes and diminished economic viability were relevant to the conclusion of a treaty, they were not so closely linked with the object and purpose of the 1977 Treaty so as to constitute an essential basis of the consent of the Parties. New developments in the efficacy of environmental knowledge were not unforeseen by the Treaty and cannot be said to represent a fundamental change. The Court did not consider whether the emergence of new environmental norms would catalyze the application of Article 62 in a situation where the terms of a treaty stand abhorrent to new norms. Hungary claimed that Variant C materially breached Articles 15, 19 and 20 of the 1977 Treaty, concerning the protection of water quality, the preservation of nature and guardianship of fishing interests. Article 60(3) of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties recognizes material breach of a treaty as a ground for termination on the part of the injured State. Extending its reasoning on the principle of approximate application, the Court held that a material breach only occurred upon the diversion of the Danube. As Czechoslovakia dammed the Danube after 19 May 1992, Hungary’s purported termination was premature and thus invalid. As its final basis for the justification of termination, Hungary advocated that, pursuant to the precautionary principle in environmental law, the obligation not to cause substantive damage to the territory of another State had evolved into an obligation erga omnes (sic utere tuo ut alienum non laedas). Slovakia countered this argument with the claim that there had been no intervening developments in international environmental law that gave rise to jus cogens norms that would override provisions of the 1977 Treaty. The Court avoided consideration of these propositions, concluding instead that “these new concerns have enhanced the relevance of Articles 15, 19 and 20”. Given that international environmental law is in its formative stages, it is unfortunate that the International Court of Justice did not grasp at this opportunity to discuss its role in the governance of relations between States. To that end, the Court may have clarified the controversial application of the sic utere principle to modify notions of unrestricted sovereignty in the Trail Smelter arbitration.

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UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND V. ICELAND International Court of Justice 17 Aug 72 – 25 Jul 74 [1974] ICJ Rep. 3 On 14 April 1972, the United Kingdom instituted proceedings against Iceland concerning a dispute over the proposed extension by Iceland of the limits of its exclusive fisheries jurisdiction from 12 nautical miles to 50 nautical miles. United Kingdom contends that such actuation is a breach of an agreement between the parties, evidenced by an Exchange of Notes in 1961. It specified therein that the United Kingdom would no longer object to a 12-mile fishery zone, that Iceland would continue to work for the implementation of the 1959 resolution regarding the extension of fisheries jurisdiction that would give the United Kingdom six months notice of such extension and that in case of a dispute in relation to such extension, the matter shall, at the request of either Party, be referred to the International Court of Justice. Iceland declared that the Court lacked jurisdiction, and declined to be represented in the proceedings. It argued that the Exchange of Notes in 1961 has already been terminated as evidenced by the policy statement issued by its Government on 4 July 1971 stating that “the agreements on fisheries jurisdiction with the British and the West Germans be terminated and that a decision be taken on the extension of fisheries jurisdiction to 50 nautical miles from base lines, and that this extension become effective not later than September 1st, 1972." At the request of the United Kingdom and the Federal Republic of Germany (which also contested the claim of Iceland), the Court in 1972 indicated, and in 1973 confirmed, provisional measures to the effect that Iceland should refrain from implementing, with respect to their vessels, the new Regulations for the extension of the fishery zone, and that the annual catch of those vessels in the disputed area should be limited to certain maxima. In Judgments delivered on 2 February 1973, the Court found that it possessed jurisdiction to deal with the merits of the dispute. The facts requiring the Court’s consideration in adjudicating upon the claim were attested by documentary evidence whose accuracy appeared to be no reason to doubt. As for the law, although it was to be regretted that Iceland had failed to appear, the Court was nevertheless deemed to take notice of international law, which lay within its own judicial knowledge. Having taken account of the legal position of each Party and acted with particular circumspection in view of the absence of the respondent State, the Court considered that it had before it the elements necessary to enable it to deliver judgment.

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In Judgments on the merits of 25 July 1974, it found that the Icelandic Regulations constituting a unilateral extension of exclusive fishing rights to a limit of 50 nautical miles were not opposable to the Government of the United Kingdom, that the Government of Iceland was not entitled unilaterally to exclude United Kingdom fishing vessels from the disputed area, and that the parties were under mutual obligations to undertake negotiations in good faith for the equitable solution of their differences concerning their respective fishery rights.

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Chapter 4: International Law and Municipal Law [G.R. No. 138570. October 10, 2000] BAYAN (Bagong Alyansang Makabayan), a JUNK VFA MOVEMENT, BISHOP TOMAS MILLAMENA [G.R. No. 138572. October 10, 2000] On March 14, 1947, the Philippines and the United States of America forged a Military Bases Agreement which formalized, among others, the use of installations in the Philippine territory by United States military personnel. To further strengthen their defense and security relationship, the Philippines and the United States entered into a Mutual Defense Treaty on August 30, 1951. Under the treaty, the parties agreed to respond to any external armed attack on their territory, armed forces, public vessels, and aircraft. In view of the impending expiration of the RP-US Military Bases Agreement in 1991, the Philippines and the United States negotiated for a possible extension of the military bases agreement. On July 18, 1997, the United States panel, headed by US Defense Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia Pacific Kurt Campbell, met with the Philippine panel, headed by Foreign Affairs Undersecretary Rodolfo Severino Jr., to exchange notes on “the complementing strategic interests of the United States and the Philippines in the Asia-Pacific region.” Both sides discussed, among other things, the possible elements of the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA for brevity). Negotiations by both panels on the VFA led to a consolidated draft text, which in turn resulted to a final series of conferences and negotiations that culminated in Manila on January 12 and 13, 1998. Thereafter, then President Fidel V. Ramos approved the VFA, which was respectively signed by public respondent Secretary Siazon and Unites States Ambassador Thomas Hubbard on February 10, 1998. On October 5, 1998, President Joseph E. Estrada, through respondent Secretary of Foreign Affairs, ratified the VFA. On October 6, 1998, the President, acting through respondent Executive Secretary Ronaldo Zamora, officially transmitted to the Senate of the Philippines, the Instrument of Ratification, the letter of the President and the VFA, for concurrence pursuant to Section 21, Article VII of the 1987 Constitution. The Senate, in turn, referred the VFA to its Committee on Foreign Relations, chaired by Senator Blas F. Ople, and its Committee on National Defense and Security, chaired by Senator Rodolfo G. Biazon, for their joint consideration and recommendation. Thereafter, joint public hearings were held by the two Committees.

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On May 3, 1999, the Committees submitted Proposed Senate Resolution No. 443 recommending the concurrence of the Senate to the VFA and the creation of a Legislative Oversight Committee to oversee its implementation. Debates then ensued. On May 27, 1999, Proposed Senate Resolution No. 443 was approved by the Senate, by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of its members. Senate Resolution No. 443 was then re-numbered as Senate Resolution No. 18. On June 1, 1999, the VFA officially entered into force after an Exchange of Notes between respondent Secretary Siazon and United States Ambassador Hubbard. The VFA, which consists of a Preamble and nine (9) Articles, provides for the mechanism for regulating the circumstances and conditions under which US Armed Forces and defense personnel may be present in the Philippines. Petitioners – as legislators, non-governmental organizations, citizens, and taxpayers – assail the constitutionality of the VFA and impute to herein respondents grave abuse of discretion in ratifying the agreement. The issues are: I. Do petitioners have legal standing as concerned citizens, taxpayers, or legislators to question the constitutionality of the VFA? II. Is the VFA governed by the provisions of Section 21, Article VII or of Section 25, Article XVIII of the Constitution? III. Do the United States has to recognize VFA as a treaty to be binding? I At the outset, respondents challenge petitioner is standing to sue, on the ground that the latter have not shown any interest in the case, and that petitioners failed to substantiate that they have sustained, or will sustain direct injury because of the operation of the VFA. Petitioners, on the other hand, counter that the validity or invalidity of the VFA is a matter of transcendental importance which justifies their standing. A party bringing a suit challenging the constitutionality of a law, act, or statute must show “not only that the law is invalid, but also that he has sustained or in is in immediate, or imminent danger of sustaining some direct injury as a result of its enforcement, and not merely that he suffers thereby in some indefinite way.” He must show that he has been, or is about to be, denied some right or privilege to which he is lawfully entitled, or that he is about to be subjected to some burdens or penalties by reason of the statute complained of. In the case before us, petitioners failed to show, to the satisfaction of this Court, that they have sustained, or are in danger of sustaining any direct injury as a result of the enforcement of the VFA. As taxpayers, petitioners have not established that the VFA involves the exercise by Congress of its taxing or spending powers.

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Clearly, inasmuch as no public funds raised by taxation are involved in this case, and in the absence of any allegation by petitioners that public funds are being misspent or illegally expended, petitioners, as taxpayers, have no legal standing to assail the legality of the VFA. Similarly, Representatives Wigberto Tañada, Agapito Aquino and Joker Arroyo, as petitioners-legislators, do not possess the requisite locus standi to maintain the present suit. We cannot, at uphold petitioners’ standing as members of Congress, in the absence of a clear showing of any direct injury to their person or to the institution to which they belong. In the same vein, petitioner Integrated Bar of the Philippines (IBP) is stripped of standing in these cases. As aptly observed by the Solicitor General, the IBP lacks the legal capacity to bring this suit in the absence of a board resolution from its Board of Governors authorizing its National President to commence the present action. II The 1987 Philippine Constitution contains two provisions requiring the concurrence of the Senate on treaties or international agreements. Section 21, Article VII, which herein respondents invoke, reads: “No treaty or international agreement shall be valid and effective unless concurred in by at least two-thirds of all the Members of the Senate.” Section 25, Article XVIII, provides: “After the expiration in 1991 of the Agreement between the Republic of the Philippines and the United States of America concerning Military Bases, foreign military bases, troops, or facilities shall not be allowed in the Philippines except under a treaty duly concurred in by the senate and, when the Congress so requires, ratified by a majority of the votes cast by the people in a national referendum held for that purpose, and recognized as a treaty by the other contracting State.” Section 21, Article VII deals with treaties or international agreements in general, in which case, the concurrence of at least two-thirds (2/3) of all the Members of the Senate is required to make the subject treaty, or international agreement, valid and binding on the part of the Philippines. This provision lays down the general rule on treatise or international agreements and applies to any form of treaty with a wide variety of subject matter, such as, but not limited to, extradition or tax treatise or those economic in nature. All treaties or international agreements entered into by the Philippines, regardless of subject matter, coverage, or particular designation or appellation, requires the concurrence of the Senate to be valid and effective. In contrast, Section 25, Article XVIII is a special provision that applies to treaties which involve the presence of foreign military bases, troops or facilities in the Philippines. Under this provision, the concurrence of the Senate is only one of the requisites to render compliance with the constitutional requirements and to consider the agreement binding on the Philippines. Section 25, Article XVIII further requires that

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“foreign military bases, troops, or facilities” may be allowed in the Philippines only by virtue of a treaty duly concurred in by the Senate, ratified by a majority of the votes cast in a national referendum held for that purpose if so required by Congress, and recognized as such by the other contracting state. It is our considered view that both constitutional provisions, far from contradicting each other, actually share some common ground. These constitutional provisions both embody phrases in the negative and thus, are deemed prohibitory in mandate and character. In particular, Section 21 opens with the clause “No treaty x x x,” and Section 25 contains the phrase “shall not be allowed.” Additionally, in both instances, the concurrence of the Senate is indispensable to render the treaty or international agreement valid and effective. To our mind, the fact that the President referred the VFA to the Senate under Section 21, Article VII, and that the Senate extended its concurrence under the same provision, is immaterial. For in either case, whether under Section 21, Article VII or Section 25, Article XVIII, the fundamental law is crystalline that the concurrence of the Senate is mandatory to comply with the strict constitutional requirements. As a whole, the VFA is an agreement, which defines the treatment of United States troops and personnel visiting the Philippines. It provides for the guidelines to govern such visits of military personnel, and further defines the rights of the United States and the Philippine government in the matter of criminal jurisdiction, movement of vessel and aircraft, importation and exportation of equipment, materials, and supplies. Undoubtedly, Section 25, Article XVIII, which specifically deals with treaties involving foreign military bases, troops, or facilities, should apply in the instant case. To a certain extent and in a limited sense, however, the provisions of section 21, Article VII will find applicability with regard to the issue and for the sole purpose of determining the number of votes required to obtain the valid concurrence of the Senate, as will be further discussed hereunder. At this juncture, we shall then resolve the issue of whether or not the requirements of Section 25 were complied with when the Senate gave its concurrence to the VFA. Section 25, Article XVIII disallows foreign military bases, troops, or facilities in the country, unless the following conditions are sufficiently met, viz: (a) it must be under a treaty; (b) the treaty must be duly concurred in by the Senate and, when so required by congress, ratified by a majority of the votes cast by the people in a national referendum; and (c) recognized as a treaty by the other contracting state. There is no dispute as to the presence of the first two requisites in the case of the VFA. The concurrence handed by the Senate through Resolution No. 18 is in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution, whether under the general requirement in Section 21, Article VII, or the specific mandate mentioned in Section 25, Article XVIII, the provision in the latter article requiring ratification by a majority of the votes cast in a national referendum being unnecessary since Congress has not required it.

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As to the matter of voting, Section 21, Article VII particularly requires that a treaty or international agreement, to be valid and effective, must be concurred in by at least two-thirds of all the members of the Senate. On the other hand, Section 25, Article XVIII simply provides that the treaty be “duly concurred in by the Senate.” Applying the foregoing constitutional provisions, a two-thirds vote of all the members of the Senate is clearly required so that the concurrence contemplated by law may be validly obtained and deemed present. While it is true that Section 25, Article XVIII requires, among other things, that the treaty-the VFA, in the instant case-be “duly concurred in by the Senate,” it is very true however that said provision must be related and viewed in light of the clear mandate embodied in Section 21, Article VII, which in more specific terms, requires that the concurrence of a treaty, or international agreement, be made by a two -thirds vote of all the members of the Senate. Indeed, Section 25, Article XVIII must not be treated in isolation to section 21, Article, VII. As noted, the “concurrence requirement” under Section 25, Article XVIII must be construed in relation to the provisions of Section 21, Article VII. In a more particular language, the concurrence of the Senate contemplated under Section 25, Article XVIII means that at least two-thirds of all the members of the Senate favorably vote to concur with the treaty-the VFA in the instant case. Under these circumstances, the charter provides that the Senate shall be composed of twenty-four (24) Senators. Without a tinge of doubt, two-thirds (2/3) of this figure, or not less than sixteen (16) members, favorably acting on the proposal is an unquestionable compliance with the requisite number of votes mentioned in Section 21 of Article VII. The fact that there were actually twenty-three (23) incumbent Senators at the time the voting was made, will not alter in any significant way the circumstance that more than two-thirds of the members of the Senate concurred with the proposed VFA, even if the two-thirds vote requirement is based on this figure of actual members (23). In this regard, the fundamental law is clear that two-thirds of the 24 Senators, or at least 16 favorable votes, suffice so as to render compliance with the strict constitutional mandate of giving concurrence to the subject treaty. III We shall now pass upon and delve on the requirement that the VFA should be recognized as a treaty by the United States of America. Whether the United States has to recognize VFA as a treaty to be binding. Petitioners contend that the phrase “recognized as a treaty,” embodied in section 25, Article XVIII, means that the VFA should have the advice and consent of the United States Senate pursuant to its own constitutional process, and that it should not be considered merely an executive agreement by the United States. In opposition, respondents argue that the letter of United States Ambassador Hubbard stating that the VFA is binding on the United States Government is conclusive, on the point that the VFA is recognized as a treaty by the United States of America.

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According to respondents, the VFA, to be binding, must only be accepted as a treaty by the United States. This Court is of the firm view that the phrase “recognized as a treaty” means that the other contracting party accepts or acknowledges the agreement as a treaty. To require the other contracting state, the United States of America in this case, to submit the VFA to the United States Senate for concurrence pursuant to its Constitution, is to accord strict meaning to the phrase. A treaty, as defined by the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, is “an international instrument concluded between States in written form and governed by international law, whether embodied in a single instrument or in two or more related instruments, and whatever its particular designation.” There are many other terms used for a treaty or international agreement, some of which are: act, protocol, agreement, compromis d’ arbitrage, concordat, convention, declaration, exchange of notes, pact, statute, charter and modus vivendi. All writers, from Hugo Grotius onward, have pointed out that the names or titles of international agreements included under the general term treaty have little or no legal significance. Certain terms are useful, but they furnish little more than mere description. Thus, in international law, there is no difference between treaties and executive agreements in their binding effect upon states concerned, as long as the negotiating functionaries have remained within their powers. International law continues to make no distinction between treaties and executive agreements: they are equally binding obligations upon nations. In our jurisdiction, we have recognized the binding effect of executive agreements even without the concurrence of the Senate or Congress. In Commissioner of Customs vs. Eastern Sea Trading, we had occasion to pronounce: “x x x the right of the Executive to enter into binding agreements without the necessity of subsequent congressional approval has been confirmed by long usage. From the earliest days of our history we have entered into executive agreements covering such subjects as commercial and consular relations, most-favored-nation rights, patent rights, trademark and copyright protection, postal and navigation arrangements and the settlement of claims. The validity of these has never been seriously questioned by our courts. “Furthermore, the United States Supreme Court has expressly recognized the validity and constitutionality of executive agreements entered into without Senate approval. Worth stressing too, is that the ratification, by the President, of the VFA and the concurrence of the Senate should be taken as a clear an unequivocal expression of our nation’s consent to be bound by said treaty, with the concomitant duty to uphold the obligations and responsibilities embodied there under.

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Ratification is generally held to be an executive act, undertaken by the head of the state or of the government, as the case may be, through which the formal acceptance of the treaty is proclaimed. A State may provide in its domestic legislation the process of ratification of a treaty. The consent of the State to be bound by a treaty is expressed by ratification when: (a) the treaty provides for such ratification, (b) it is otherwise established that the negotiating States agreed that ratification should be required, (c) the representative of the State has signed the treaty subject to ratification, or (d) the intention of the State to sign the treaty subject to ratification appears from the full powers of its representative, or was expressed during the negotiation. In our jurisdiction, the power to ratify is vested in the President and not, as commonly believed, in the legislature. The role of the Senate is limited only to giving or withholding its consent, or concurrence, to the ratification. With the ratification of the VFA, which is equivalent to final acceptance, and with the exchange of notes between the Philippines and the United States of America, it now becomes obligatory and incumbent on our part, under the principles of international law, to be bound by the terms of the agreement. Thus, no less than Section 2, Article II of the Constitution, declares that the Philippines adopts the generally accepted principles of international law as part of the law of the land and adheres to the policy of peace, equality, justice, freedom, cooperation and amity with all nations. As an integral part of the community of nations, we are responsible to assure that our government, Constitution and laws will carry out our international obligation. Hence, we cannot readily plead the Constitution as a convenient excuse for non-compliance with our obligations, duties and responsibilities under international law. Article 13 of the Declaration of Rights and Duties of States adopted by the International Law Commission in 1949 provides: “Every State has the duty to carry out in good faith its obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law, and it may not invoke provisions in its constitution or its laws as an excuse for failure to perform this duty.” Equally important is Article 26 of the convention which provides that “Every treaty in force is binding upon the parties to it and must be performed by them in good faith.” This is known as the principle of pacta sunt servanda which preserves the sanctity of treaties and have been one of the most fundamental principles of positive international law, supported by the jurisprudence of international tribunals. As to the power to concur with treaties, the constitution lodges the same with the Senate alone. Thus, once the Senate performs that power, or exercises its prerogative within the boundaries prescribed by the Constitution, the concurrence cannot, in like manner, be viewed to constitute an abuse of power, much less grave abuse thereof. Corollarily, the Senate, in the exercise of its discretion and acting within the limits of such power, may not be similarly faulted for having simply performed a task conferred and sanctioned by no less than the fundamental law.

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For the role of the Senate in relation to treaties is essentially legislative in character; the Senate, as an independent body possessed of its own erudite mind, has the prerogative to either accept or reject the proposed agreement, and whatever action it takes in the exercise of its wide latitude of discretion, pertains to the wisdom rather than the legality of the act. In this sense, the Senate partakes a principal, yet delicate, role in keeping the principles of separation of powers and of checks and balances alive and vigilantly ensures that these cherished rudiments remain true to their form in a democratic government such as ours. The Constitution thus animates, through this treatyconcurring power of the Senate, a healthy system of checks and balances indispensable toward our nation’s pursuit of political maturity and growth. True enough, rudimentary is the principle that matters pertaining to the wisdom of a legislative act are beyond the ambit and province of the courts to inquire. In fine, absent any clear showing of grave abuse of discretion on the part of respondents, this Court- as the final arbiter of legal controversies and staunch sentinel of the rights of the people - is then without power to conduct an incursion and meddle with such affairs purely executive and legislative in character and nature. For the Constitution no less, maps out the distinct boundaries and limits the metes and bounds within which each of the three political branches of government may exercise the powers exclusively and essentially conferred to it by law. Petitions dismissed

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HEAD MONEY CASES EDYE V. ROBERTSON 112 U.S. 580 1884 The suit is brought to recover from Robertson, collector of the port of New York, sum of money he received from the plaintiffs, on account of their landing in that port, passengers not citizens of the United States. The collection was based on the act of Congress entitled “An act to regulate immigration” on August 3, 1882. The act provides that there shall be levied, collected, and paid a duty of 50 cents for each and every passenger, not a citizen of the United States, who shall come by steam or sail vessel from a foreign port to any port within the United States. The said duty shall be paid to the collector of customs of the port where the passenger shall come. The plaintiffs are partners in trade in the city of New York under the firm name Funch, Edye & Co. involved in the business of transporting passengers and freight upon the high seas between Holland and the United States of America as consignees and agents. On October 2, 1882, it sailed to the port of New York and carried 382 persons not citizens of United States and among said persons, there were 20 severally under age of one year and 59 were severally between the ages of one year and eight years. On this account, Robertson, the collector of the said port, decided that the plaintiffs must pay a duty of 191 dollars for the said passengers costing 50 cents for each of the 382 passengers before they be permitted to land. The plaintiffs paid and protested against the payment. The circuit court rendered judgment in favor of the defendant and which is called upon review. The issue is whether the act of Congress violates treaties by the Unites States with friendly nations? The opinion of the court is that as far as the provisions of the act may be found to be in conflict with any treaty with foreign nation, the act must prevail in all judicial courts of this country. The court held that: “A treaty is primarily a compact between independent nations. It depends for the enforcement of its provisions on the interest and the honor of the governments which are parties to it. If these fail, its infraction becomes the subject of international negotiations and reclamations, so far as the injured party chooses to seek redress, which may in the end be enforced by actual war. It is obvious that with all this the judicial courts have nothing to do and can give no redress.

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But a treaty may also contain provision which confer certain rights upon the citizens or subjects of one nations residing in the territorial limits of the other, which partake of the nature of municipal law, and which are capable of enforcement as between private parties in the courts of the country. ...The constitution of the United States places provisions in the treaties in the same category as other laws of Congress by its declaration that “this constitution and the laws made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made or which shall be made under authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land”. A treaty, then, is a law of the land as an act of Congress is, whenever its provisions prescribe a rule by which the rights of the private citizen or subject may be determined. And when such rights are of a nature to be enforced in a court of justice, that court resorts to the treaty for a rule decision for the case before it as it would to a statute. But even in this aspect of the case there is nothing in this law which makes it irrepealable or unchangeable. The constitution gives it no superiority over and act of Congress in this respect, which may be repealed or modified by an act of a later date. Nor is there anything in its essential character, or in branches of the government by which the treaty is made, which gives it this superior sanctity. The court opined that so far as a treaty made by the United States with any foreign nation can become the subject of judicial cognizance in the courts of this country, it is subject to such acts as Congress may pass for its enforcement, modification, or repeal.” The judgment of the circuit court is affirmed.

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Whitney v. Robertson 124 U.S. 190 (1888) The plaintiffs are merchants, doing business in the city of New York; and in August, 1882, they imported a large quantity of 'centrifugal and molasses sugars,' the produce and manufacture of the island of San Domingo. These goods were similar in kind to sugars produced in the Hawaiian islands, which are admitted free of duty under the treaty with the king of those islands, and the act of congress passed to carry the treaty into effect. They were duly entered at the custom-house at the port of New York; the plaintiffs claiming that, by the treaty with the republic of San Domingo, the goods should be admitted on the same terms, that is, free of duty, as similar articles, the produce and manufacture of the Hawaiian islands. The defendant, who was at the time collector of the port, refused to allow this claim, treated the goods as dutiable articles under the acts of congress, and exacted duties on them to the amount of $21,936. The plaintiffs appealed from the collector's decision to the secretary of the treasury, by whom the appeal was denied. They then paid, under protest, the duties exacted, and brought the present action to recover the amount. The defendant demurred to the complaint, the demurrer was sustained, and final judgment was entered in his favor; to review which the case is brought here. The issue is whether or not the treaty with a foreign sovereign has been violated Supreme Court held that act of congress under which the duties were collected, authorized their exaction. It is of general application, making no exception in favor of goods of any country. It was passed after the treaty with the Dominican republic, and, if there be any conflict between the stipulations of the treaty and the requirements of the law, the latter must control. A treaty is primarily a contract between two or more independent nations, and is so regarded by writers on public law. For the infraction of its provisions a remedy must be sought by the injured party through reclamations upon the other. When the stipulations are not self- executing, they can only be enforced pursuant to legislation to carry them into effect, and such legislation is as much subject to modification and repeal by congress as legislation upon any other subject. If the treaty contains stipulations which are self-executing, that is, require no legislation to make them operative, to that extent they have the force and effect of a legislative enactment. Congress may modify such provisions, so far as they bind the United States, or supersede them altogether.

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By the constitution, a treaty is placed on the same footing, and made of like obligation, with an act of legislation. Both are declared by that instrument to be the supreme law of the land, and no superior efficacy is given to either over the other. When the two relate to the same subject, the courts will always endeavor to construe them so as to give effect to both, if that can be done without violating the language of either; but, if the two are inconsistent, the one last in date will control the other: provided, always, the stipulation of the treaty on the subject is self- executing. If the country with which the treaty is made is dissatisfied with the action of the legislative department, it may present its complaint to the executive head of the government, and take such other measures as it may deem essential for the protection of its interests. The courts can afford no redress. Whether the complaining nation has just cause of complaint, or our country was justified in its legislation, are not matters for judicial cognizance. It follows, therefore, that, when a law is clear in its provisions, its validity cannot be assailed before the courts for want of conformity to stipulations of a previous treaty not already executed. Considerations of that character belong to another department of the government. The duty of the courts is to construe and give effect to the latest expression of the sovereign will. In Head-Money Cases, 112 U. S. 580, it was objected to an act of congress that it violated provisions contained in treaties with foreign nations, but the court replied that, so far as the provisions of the act were in conflict with any treaty, they must prevail in all the courts of the country; and, after a full and elaborate consideration of the subject, it held that, 'so far as a treaty made by the United States with any foreign nation can be the subject of judicial cognizance in the courts of this country, it is subject to such acts as congress may pass for its enforcement, modification, or repeal.' Judgment affirmed.

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Chapter 5: Subjects of International Law PRINCIPALITY OF SEALAND Sealand was founded as a sovereign Principality in 1967 in international waters, six miles off the eastern shores of Britain. The island fortress is conveniently situated from 65 to 100 miles from the coasts of France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. The official language of Sealand is English and the Sealand Dollar has a fixed exchange rate of one U.S. dollar. Passports and stamps have been in circulation since 1969, however, contrary to many misleading websites and news articles, Sealand passports are not for sale, and anyone offering such are selling forgeries. Within a radius of 500 miles of Sealand live more than 200 million people who enjoy some of the highest standards of living in the world. This area also encompasses the financial, industrial and cultural heart of Europe. The history of Sealand is a story of a struggle for liberty. Sealand was founded on the principle that any group of people dissatisfied with the oppressive laws and restrictions of existing nation states may declare independence in any place not claimed to be under the jurisdiction of another sovereign entity. The location chosen was Roughs Tower, an island fortress created in World War II by Britain and subsequently abandoned to the jurisdiction of the High Seas. The independence of Sealand was upheld in a 1968 British court decision where the judge held that Roughs Tower stood in international waters and did not fall under the legal jurisdiction of the United Kingdom. This gave birth to Sealand's national motto of E Mare Libertas, or "From the Sea, Freedom". Prince Roy's heir apparent, Michael of Sealand, wrote the following statement in relation to a recent incident involving a fake Sealand passport. It can be extended to other situations where basic facts regarding Sealand have been misrepresented. This website is the only official website of the Government of Sealand. The website that was originally constructed for Sealand is located at http://www.fruitsofthesea.demon.co.uk/sealand/, and is maintained there for historical purposes. "We would like to make it clear that after 32 years of pioneering work, and the blood sweat and tears that have been part of the rich adventure in the formation and establishment of the Principality of Sealand, our web site is the only official web site of the Principality of Sealand. It has come to our attention that others are claiming to represent us on the Internet and in the press, even showing photographs of my family and offering membership of business foundations, fake Sealand passports, and other services. Some of these people, it seems, were involved in the terrorist attack on Sealand in the 1970s that nearly resulted in loss of life, and did

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involve an international incident with the British, Dutch and German governments." ~ Michael of Sealand

History Of Sealand During World War II, the United Kingdom decided to establish a number of military bases, the purpose of which was to defend England against German air raids. These sea forts housed enough troops to man and maintain artillery designed to shoot down German aircraft and missiles. They were situated along the east coast of England on the edge of the English territorial waters. One of these bases, consisting of concrete and steel construction, was the famous royal fort Roughs Tower situated slightly north of the estuary region of the Thames River. In contrast to the original plan to locate the tower within the sovereign territory of England, this fortress was situated at a distance of approximately 7 nautical miles from the coast, which is more than double the then applicable 3 mile range of territorial waters; to put it briefly, this island was situated in the international waters of the North Sea. After WWII ended, the troops were withdrawn from all bases by the British Admiralty. None of them was ever used by the United Kingdom again, leaving the forts deserted and abandoned. Except for the aforementioned fortress, the bases were subsequently pulled down. This resulted in the portentous uniqueness of the fortress. Fort Roughs Tower, situated at the high seas, had been deserted and abandoned, res derelicta and terra nullius. From a legal point of view, it therefore constituted extra-national territory. The Birth of Sealand This paved the way for occupation. On 2 September 1967, former English major Paddy Roy Bates formally occupied the island and settled there with his family. After intensive discussions with skillful English lawyers, Roy Bates proclaimed the island his own state. Claiming jus gentium, he bestowed upon himself the title of Prince and the title of Princess to his wife and subsequently made the state the Principality of Sealand. Roy Bates, henceforth Roy of Sealand, exerted state authority on the island and thus was an absolute sovereign. The royal family and other persons that have declared loyalty to Sealand have occupied Sealand ever since. Initial Challenge to Sealand's Sovereignty By late 1968, the British navy had become aware of the new situation off the coast of England. They were interested in terminating the state of affairs brought about by an error committed by the most senior military authorities without causing too much uproar.

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Units of the navy entered the territorial waters claimed by Roy of Sealand. As he was aware of his sovereignty, Roy of Sealand threatened the navy by undertaking defensive activity. Shots were fired from Sealand in warning. Since Roy of Sealand was still an English citizen, he was thus accused of extensive crimes in Britain and was summoned to an English court. The result of this lawsuit in Chelmsford, Essex was a spectacular success for Sealand's claim to sovereignty. In its judgment of 25 November 1968, the court declared that it was not competent in Roy of Sealand's case as it could not exert any jurisdiction outside of British national territory. This is the first de facto recognition of the Principality of Sealand. English law had ruled that Sealand was not part of the United Kingdom, nor did any other nation claim it, hence Prince Roy's declaration of a new Sovereign State was de facto upheld. Building a New Nation Seven years later on 25 September 1975, Roy of Sealand proclaimed the Constitution of the Principality. Over time, other national treasures were developed, such as the flag of the Principality of Sealand, its national anthem, stamps, as well as gold and silver coins launched as Sealand Dollars. Finally, passports of the Principality of Sealand were issued to those who had helped Sealand in some way, though they were never for sale. Sealand Fights Off Invaders (and Wins a War) In August of 1978, a number of Dutch men came to Sealand in the employ of a German businessman. They were there to discuss business dealings with Sealand. While Roy was away in Britain, these men kidnapped Prince Roy's son Michael, and took Sealand by force. Soon after, Roy recaptured the island with a group of his own men and held the attackers as prisoners of war. During the time that he held the prisoners, the Governments of the Netherlands and Germany petitioned for their release. First they asked England to intervene in the matter, but the British government cited their earlier court decision as evidence that they made no claim to the territory of Sealand. Then, in an act of de facto recognition of Sealand's sovereignty, Germany sent a diplomat directly to Sealand to negotiate for the release of their citizen. Roy first released the Dutch citizens, as the war was over, and the Geneva Convention requires the release of all prisoners. The German was held longer, as he had accepted a Sealand Passport, and therefore was guilty of treason. Prince Roy, who was grateful that the incident had not resulted in a loss of life, and did not want to bloody the reputation of Sealand, eventually released him as well. Extension of Territorial Waters

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On 1 October, 1987, Britain extended its territorial waters from 3 to 12 nautical miles. The previous day, Prince Roy declared the extension of Sealand's territorial waters to be a like 12 nautical miles, so that right of way from the open sea to Sealand would not be blocked by British claimed waters. No treaty has been signed between Britain and Sealand to divide up the overlapping areas, but a general policy of dividing the area between the two countries down the middle can be assumed. International law does not allow the claim of new land during the extension of sea rights, so Sealand's sovereignty was safely "grandfathered" in. Britain has no more right to Sealand's territory than Sealand has to the territory of the British coastline that falls within its claimed 12 nautical mile arc. Some nations might have tried to use this as an excuse to try to claim all of the territory of the weaker and not well recognized nation regardless of international law, however, this has not been the case. Britain has made no attempt to take Sealand, and the British government still treats it as an independent State. Prince Roy continues to pay no British National Insurance during the time he resides on Sealand subsequent to a ruling by the British Department of Health and Social Security's solicitor's branch. Also, there was another fire arms incident in 1990 when a ship strayed too near Sealand and warning shots were again fired. The ship's crew made complaints to British authorities and a newspaper article ran detailing the incident. Yet despite Britain's severe prohibition of firearms, British authorities have never pursued the matter. This is a clear indication that Britain's Home Office still considers Sealand to be outside their zone of control. Fake Sealand Passports In 1997, forged Sealand passports started tuning up around the world. Some of these were used to open bank accounts under false names in various countries. Since few people have ever seen a legitimate Sealand passport (less than 300 exist today) it was difficult for these to be easily detected as forgeries. The source of these forgeries was traced back to the same German man who was involved in the earlier attempt to take Sealand by force. Dubbing himself Minister of Finance, he had created a fake Sealand Business Foundation and boasts that he has sold over 150 000 fake Sealand Passports to all comers. Thus there are now unfortunately 500 times more forged Sealand Passports in circulation than real ones. Many of the forged passports were apparently sold to people leaving Hong Kong at the time of Chinese reoccupation for USD 1 000 each. Current Views of the Principality of Sealand The current government of the Principality of Sealand considers itself to be sovereign, and to have been recognized de facto as such on the basis of the aforementioned statements by multiple world governments. It states the following: "The Principality of Sealand recognizes jus gentium and has undertaken to regulate any activity with a view to compliance with jus gentium and international law or to have it regulated."

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The existence of the Principality as an independent State and the de facto recognition of its sovereignty has been demonstrated time and time again over the last three decades by European and other States and in particular by its nearest neighbour, the United Kingdom. Britain has stated clearly and has demonstrated on a number of occasions either that it has no jurisdiction within Principality territorial limits or that it has no interest in events that have taken place within the Principality. Moreover, a number of independent legal experts have weighed carefully all arguments for and against Sealand sovereignty and unanimously have agreed that jus gentium applies as a basic principle underpinning the independence of the Principality. This position is further supported by de facto events which demonstrate that reality. On many occasions, other States have either left Sealand alone to deal internationally with matters critical to its National interest, or have recognised Sealand as the legal and administrative authority over all activities within its territorial limits. Even today, the United Kingdom government recognises, inter alia, residency or work in Sealand as an overseas activity. The Internet Comes to Sealand Whilst Sealand has been the pride and joy of Prince Roy and his family for well over 30 years, his recent poor health has caused him fundamentally to review the arrangements which have been in place for decades and to look to the future of his Principality. Consequently, his son Prince Michael was appointed Prince Regent as Sovereign pro tempore by Royal Decree in 1999. Since that time, the Royal Family has struck a deal with HavenCo Limited, and that company now leases exclusively its offices and operations centres in Sealand, where it offers, and is able to offer, unparalleled security and independence to users who wish to take advantage of its Internet colocation services. The presence of an active and rapidly growing high-tech internet industry in Sealand has changed the character of the Principality; once more, Sealand rings with the sound of voices, boasts regular support ferry services, and is host to a growing and dynamic population. Because of the high security required to support HavenCo's operations, access to Sealand remains highly restricted and no public visits are allowed. Further information or specific queries may be addressed to the Bureau of Internal Affairs ([email protected]) at SEALAND 1001, Sealand Post Bag, IP11 9SZ, UK. Due to the current international situation and other factors, visits to the Principality of Sealand are not normally permitted. Accordingly, the application list for visas is for the time being closed.

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The Principality structure of government is determined by its Constitution and a chart describing the link between the various offices may be found here. It should be noted that there are no 'ministers', 'secretaries', or other similar titles associated with the Principality, its civil servants, and its government. It should also be noted that the Principality offices do not include legations, embassies, consulates, or other diplomatic offices in Germany or in Switzerland at locations set out in the web sites above. According to State Decree 2032 dated 9 July 2002, a central State Bank, the Royal Bank of Sealand, has been established for the regulation and licensing of financial business within the Principality and for managing the State economy. The Comptroller of the Royal Bank, Mr. Jean-Michel Sporn, was appointed by the Head of State in April of 2003. Mr. Sporn has asked the Office of the Head of State to give notice that the Royal Bank is now fully in operation from its principal office at 5, The Row, Sealand 1001 and from its Bureau of Representation located at 7, rue des Alpes, PO Box 1009, Geneva 1, Switzerland CH-1211. Details of its activities and other information will be available on this government web site soon. The Royal Bank has licensed Goldrain Bank Ltd to conduct business under State Decree 2010, and this bank is also operational from its offices in the Principality and its Bureau of Representation in Geneva located at 7, rue des Alpes, PO Box 1009, Geneva 1, Switzerland CH-1211.

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INTERNATIONAL STATUS OF SOUTH WEST AFRICA The Territory of South-West Africa was one of the German overseas possessions in respect of which Germany, by Article 119 of the Treaty of Versailles renounced all her rights and titles in favour of the Principal Allied and Associated Powers. After the war of 1914-1918 this Territory was placed under a Mandate conferred upon the Union of South Africa which was to have full power of administration and legislation over the Territory as an integral portion of the Union. The Union Government was to exercise an international Sanction of administration on behalf of the League, with the object of promoting the well-being and development of the inhabitants. After the second world war, the Union of South Africa, alleging that the Mandate had lapsed, sought the recognition of the United Nations to the integration of the Territory in the Union. The United Nations refused their consent to this integration and invited the Union of South Africa to place the Territory under Trusteeship, according to the provisions of Chapter XII of the Charter. UN refused and instead, requesting for and advisory opinion, posed the following questions to the ICJ: a) Does the Union of South Africa continue to have international Obligations under the Mandate for South West Africa and if so, what are those obligations? b.) Are the provisions of Chapter XII of the Charter applicable to the Territory of South West Africa? c.) Has the Union of South Africa the competence to modify the international status of the territory of South West Africa? Where does the competence rest to determine and modify the status of the Territory? In its opinion the Court examined first if the Mandate conferred by the Principal Allied and Associated Powers on His Britannic Majesty, to be exercised on his behalf by the Union of South Africa, over the Territory of South-West Africa was still in existence. The Court declared that the League was not a "mandator" in the sense in which this term is used in the national law of certain states. The Mandate had only the name in common with the several notions of mandate in national law. The essentially international character of the functions of the Union appeared from the fact that these functions were subject to the supervision of the Council of the League and to the obligation to present annual reports to it; it also appeared from the fact that any Member of the League could 34

submit to the Permanent Court of International Justice any dispute with the Union Government relating to the interpretation or the application of the provisions of the Mandate. The international obligations assumed by the Union of South Africa were of two kinds. One kind was directly related to the administration of the Territory and corresponded to the sacred trust of civilization referred to in article 22 of the Covenant; the other related to the machinery for implementation and was closely linked to the supervision and control of the League. It corresponded to the "securities for the performance of this trust" referred to in the same Article. The obligations of the first group represent the very essence of the sacred trust of civilization. Their raison d'être and original object remain. Since their fulfillment did not depend on the existence of the League of Nations, they could not be brought to an end merely because this supervisory organ ceased to exist. This view is confirmed by Article 80, paragraph 1, of the Charter, maintaining the rights of States and peoples and the terms of existing international instruments until the territories in question are placed under the trusteeship system. Moreover, the resolution of the League of Nations of April 18, 1946, said that the League's functions with respect to mandated territories would come to an end; it did not say that the Mandates themselves came to an end. By this Resolution the Assembly of the League of Nations manifested its understanding that the Mandates would continue in existence until "other arrangements" were established and the Union of South Africa, in declarations made to the League of Nations as well as to the United Nations, had recognized that its obligations under the Mandate continued after the disappearance of the League. Interpretation placed upon legal instruments by the parties to them, though not conclusive as to their meaning, have considerable probative value when they contain recognition by a party of its own obligations under an instrument. With regard to the second group of obligations, the Court said that some doubts might arise from the fact that the supervisory functions of the League with regard to mandated territories not placed under the new trusteeship system were neither expressly transferred to the United Nations, nor expressly assumed by that Organization. Nevertheless, the obligation incumbent upon a Mandatory State to accept international supervision and to submit reports is an important part of the Mandates System. It could not be concluded that the obligation to submit to supervision had disappeared merely because the supervisory organ had ceased to exist when the United Nations had another international organ performing similar, though not identical, supervisory functions. These general considerations were confirmed by Article 80, paragraph 1, of the Charter, which purports to safeguard not only the rights of States, but also the rights of the peoples of mandated territories until trusteeship agreements were concluded. The competence of the General Assembly of the United Nations to exercise such supervision and to receive and examine reports is derived from the provisions of Article 10 of the Charter, which authorizes the General Assembly to discuss any questions on any matters

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within the scope of the Charter, and make recommendations to the Members of the United Nations. Moreover, the Resolution of April 18th, 1946, of the Assembly of the League of Nations presupposes that the supervisory functions exercised by the League would be taken over by the United Nations. The right of petition was not mentioned in the Covenant or the Mandate, but was organized by a decision of the Council of the League. The Court was of opinion that this right which the inhabitants of South-West Africa had thus acquired, was maintained by Article 80, paragraph 1, of the Charter, as this clause was interpreted above. The Court was therefore of the opinion that petitions are to be transmitted by the Government of the Union to the General Assembly of the United Nations, which is legally qualified to deal with them. Therefore, South-West Africa is still to be considered a territory held under the Mandate of December 17th, 1920. The degree of supervision by the General Assembly should not exceed that which applied under the Mandates System. These observations apply to annual reports and petitions. Having regard to Article 37 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice and Article 80, paragraph 1, of the Charter, the Court was of opinion that this clause in the Mandate was still in force, and therefore that the Union of South Africa was under an obligation to accept the compulsory jurisdiction of the Court according to those provisions. With regard to question (b) the Court said that Chapter XII of the Charter applied to the Territory of South-West Africa in this sense, that it provides a means by which the Territory may be brought under the trusteeship system. With regard to the second part of the question, dealing with the manner in which those provisions are applicable, the Court said that the provisions of this chapter did not impose upon the Union of South Africa an obligation to put the Territory under Trusteeship by means of a Trusteeship Agreement. This opinion is based on the permissive language of Articles 75 and 77. These Articles refer to an "agreement" which implies consent of the parties concerned. The fact that Article 77 refers to the "voluntary" placement of certain Territories under Trusteeship does not show that the placing of other territories under Trusteeship is compulsory. The word "voluntary" used with respect to territories in category (c) in Article 77 can be explained as having been used out of an abundance of caution and as an added assurance of free initiative to States having territories falling within that category. The Court considered that if Article 80, paragraph 2 had been intended to create an obligation for a Mandatory State to negotiate and conclude an agreement, such intention would have been expressed in a direct manner. It considered also that this article did not create an obligation to enter into negotiations with a view to concluding a Trusteeship Agreement as this provision expressly refers to delay or postponement "of the negotiation and conclusion", and not to negotiations only. Moreover, it refers not

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merely to territories held under mandate but also to other territories. Finally the obligation merely to negotiate does not of itself assure the conclusion of Trusteeship Agreements. It is true that the Charter has contemplated and regulated only one single system, the international Trusteeship system. If it may be concluded that it was expected that the mandatory States would follow the normal course indicated by the Charter and conclude Trusteeship Agreements, the Court was unable to deduce from these general considerations any legal obligation for mandatory States to conclude or negotiate such agreements. It is not for the Court to pronounce on the political or moral duties which these considerations may involve. With regard to question (c) the Court decided that the Union had no competence to modify unilaterally the international status of the Territory. It repeated that the normal way of modifying the international status of the Territory would be to place it under the Trusteeship System by means of a Trusteeship Agreement, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter XII of the Charter. Article 7 of the Mandate required the authorization of the Council of the League for any modifications of its terms. In accordance with the reply given to question (a) the Court said that those powers of supervision now belong to the General Assembly of the United Nations. Articles 79 and 85 of the Charter required that a trusteeship agreement be approved by the General Assembly. By analogy it could be inferred that the same procedure was applicable to any modification of the international status of a territory under Mandate which would not have for its purpose the placing of the territory under the trusteeship system. Moreover, the Union of South Africa itself decided to submit the question of the future international status of the territory to the "judgment" of the General Assembly as the "competent international organ". In so doing, the Union recognised the competence of the General Assembly in the matter. On the basis of these considerations, the Court concluded that competence to determine and modify the international status of the Territory rested with the Union, acting in agreement with the United Nations

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THE TINOCO ARBITRATION Great Britain vs. Costa Rica (1923) William H. Taft, Arbitrator In January 1917, the Government of Costa Rica, under President Alfredo Gonzalez, was overthrown by Frederico Tinoco. Tinoco assumed power, called an election, and established a new constitution in June, 1917. His government continued until August, 1919, when Tinoco retired, and left the country. His government fell in September following. ... the old constitution was restored and elections held under it. The restored government is a signatory to this treaty of arbitration. On the 22nd of August, 1922, the Constitutional Congress of the restored Costa Rican Government passed a law known as Law of Nullities NO.41. It invalidated all contracts between the executive power and private persons, made with or without approval of the legislative power between January 27, 1917 and September 2, 1919, covering the period of the Tinoco government. It also nullified the legislative decree No.12 of the Tinoco government, dated June 28, 1919, authorizing the issue of the fifteen million colones currency notes ... [and] the legislative decree of the Tinoco government of July 8, 1919, authorizing the circulation of notes of the nomination of 1000 colones, and annulled all transactions with such colones bills between holders and the state." The claim of Great Britain is that the Royal Bank of Canada and the Central Costa Rica Petroleum Company are British corporations whose shares are owned by British subjects; that the Banco Internacional of Costa Rica and the Government of Costa Rica are both indebted to the Royal Bank in the sum of 998,000 colones, evidenced by 998 on thousand colones bills held by the Bank; that the Central Costa Rica Petroleum Company owns, by due assignment, a grant by the Tinoco government in 1918, of the right to explore for and exploit deposits in Costa Rica, and that both the indebtedness and the concession have been annulled without right by the Law of Nullities and would be excepted from its operation. She asks ... to have the claim of the bank paid, and the concession recognized and given effect by the Costa Rican Government. The Government of Costa Rica denies its liability for the acts or obligations of the Tinoco government and maintains that the Law of Nullities was a legitimate exercise of its legislative governing power. It further denies the validity of such claims on the merits, unaffected by the Law of Nullities. Coming now to the general issues applicable to both claims, Great Britain contends, first, that the Tinoco government was the only government of Costa Rica de facto and de jure for two years and nine months; that during that time there is no other government disputing its sovereignty, that it was in peaceful administration of the whole

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country, with the acquiescence of its people. The effects of the recognition of the government. Second, that the contracts and obligations of the Tinoco government, set up by Great Britain on behalf of its subjects, are void ... because the government of Tinoco and its acts were in violation of the constitution of Costa Rica of 1871. Changes in the government or the internal policy of a state do not as a rule affect its position in international law ... though the government changes, the nation remains, with rights and obligations unimpaired. Under the principle of the continuity of states, the state is bound by engagements entered into by governments that have ceased to exist; the restored government is generally liable for the acts of the usurper ... Foreign powers deal with the existing de facto government, when sufficiently established to give reasonable assurance of its permanence, and of the acquiescence of those who constitute the state in its ability to maintain itself and discharge its ... external obligations ..." Taft cites other authorities in support of this principle, and then proceeds to determine whether the Tinoco regime constituted a de facto government: "... In January, 1917, Frederico A. Tinoco was Secretary of War under Alfredo Gonzalez, the then President of Costa Rica. On the ground that Gonzalez was seeking reelection as President in violation of a constitutional limitation, Tinoco used the army and navy to seize the Government, [and] assumed the provisional headship of the Republic ... Tinoco constituted a provisional government at once ... a new constitution was adopted June 8, 1917, supplanting the constitution of 1871. [An election was held which Tinoco won by a margin of 61,000 votes to 259 votes.] For a full two years Tinoco and the legislative assembly under him peaceably administered the affairs of the Government of Costa Rica, and there was no disorder of a revolutionary character during that interval. No other government of any kind asserted power in the country ... The people seemed to have accepted Tinoco's government with great good will ... there is no substantial evidence that Tinoco was not in actual and peaceable administration without resistance or conflict or contest by anyone until a few months before the time when he retired and resigned... I must hold that ... the Tinoco government was an actual sovereign government. But it is urged that many leading Powers refused to recognize the Tinoco government ... Undoubtedly recognition by other Powers is an important evidential factor in establishing proof of the existence of a government in the society of nations. The non-recognition by other nations of a government claiming to be a national personality, is usually appropriate evidence that it has not attained the independence and control entitling it by international law to be classed as such. But when recognition of a government is by such nations determined by inquiry, not into its de facto sovereignty

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and complete governmental control, but into its illegitimacy or irregularity of origin, their non-recognition loses something of evidential weight ... [it] cannot outweigh the evidence disclosed by this record before me as to the de facto character of Tinoco's government ... It is argued on behalf of Costa Rica that the Tinoco government cannot be considered a de facto government, because it was not established and maintained in accord with the constitution of Costa Rica of 1871. To hold that a government ... does not become a de facto government unless it conforms to a previous constitution would be to hold that within the rules of international law a revolution contrary to the fundamental law of the existing government cannot establish a new government. This cannot be, and is not, true. It is further objected by Costa Rica that Great Britain by her failure to recognize the Tinoco government is estopped now to urge claims of her subjects dependent upon the acts and contracts of the Tinoco government ... [The U.S. cases cited in support] have no bearing on the point before us. Here the executive of Great Britain takes the position that the Tinoco government which it did not recognize, was nevertheless a de facto government that could create rights in British subjects which it now seeks to protect. Non-recognition may have aided the succeeding government to come into power; but subsequent presentation of claims based on the de facto existence of the previous government ... does not work an injury to the succeeding government in the nature of a fraud or breach of good faith. Anent second issue, The [oil] concession is now owned by the Central Costa Rica Petroleum Company of Canada, and all its stock is owned by the British Controlled Oil Fields, Ltd. ... The concessionaire was granted the exclusive right during fifty years to develop and exploit the deposits located by him ... The grant was made on [certain conditions, including provision of oil to the government and local investment] ... It seems to me that substantially everything was done by the concessionaires or their assignee required by the contract ... The most serious objection to the concession is that it was granted by a body without power to grant it. Its validity is, as I have already said, to be determined by the law in existence at the time of its granting ... [After a discussion of the 1917 constitution]... the government of Tinoco itself could have defeated this concession on the ground of a lack of power in the Chamber of Deputies [the granting institution] to approve it. Therefore, is that the Law of Nullities will work no injury of which Great Britain can complain, if Costa Rica assigns all her interest in the mortgage for $100,000 upon Tinoco's estate. My award further is that the Law of Nullities in decreeing the invalidity of the Amory concession worked no injury to the Central Costa Rica Petroleum Company of which Great Britain can complain, because the concession was in fact invalid under the Constitution of 1917.

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UPRIGHT V. MERCURY BUSINESS MACHINES CO. Plaintiff, an individual, sues as the assignee of a trade acceptance drawn on and accepted by defendant in payment for business typewriters sold and delivered to it by a foreign corporation. The trade acceptance is in the amount for $27,307.45 and was assigned to plaintiff after dishonor by defendant. Involved in this appeal is only the legal sufficiency if the first affirmative defense. It alleges that the foreign corporation is the creature of the East German Government, a government not recognized by the United States. It alleges, moreover, that such corporation is an enterprise controlled by and that it is an arm and instrument of such government. On Motion addressed to its sufficiency Special Term sustained defense. For the reasons that follow the defense should have been stricken as legally insufficient. A foreign government, although not recognized by the political arm of the United States Government, ,ay nevertheless have de facto existence which is juridically cognizable. The acts of such a de facto government may affect private rights and obligations arising either as a result of activity in, or with persons or corporations within, the territory controlled by such de facto government. In the Russian Reinsurance Co. case, Lehman, J., later Chief Judge, summarized the principles: “The fall of one governmental establishment and the substitution of another governmental establishment which actually governs, which is able to enforce its claims by military force and is obeyed by the people over whom it rules, must profoundly affect all the acts and duties, all the relations of those who live within the territory over which the new establishment exercises rule. Its rule may be without lawful foundation; but lawful or unlawful, its existence is a fact, and that fact cannot be destroyed by juridical concepts. The State Department determines whether it will recognize its existence as lawful, and, until the State Department has recognized the new establishment, the court may not pass upon its legitimacy or ascribe to its decrees all the effect which inheres in the laws or orders of a sovereign. The State Department determines only that question. It cannot determine how far the private rights and obligations of individuals are affected by acts of a body not sovereign, or with which our government will have no dealings. The question does not concern our foreign relations. It is not a political question, but a judicial question. The courts in considering that question assume as a premise that until recognition these acts are not in full sense law. Their conclusion must depend upon whether these have nevertheless had such an actual effect that they may not be

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disregarded. In such case we deal with result rather than cause. We do not pass upon what such an unrecognized governmental authority may do, or upon the right or wrong of what it has done; we consider the effect upon others of that which has been done, primarily from the point of view of fact rather than of theory.” So, too, only limited effect is given to the fact that the political arm has not recognized a foreign government. Realistically, the courts apprehend that political nonrecognition may serve only narrow purposes. While the judicial arm obligates itself to follow the suggestions of the political arm in effecting such narrow purposes, nevertheless, it will not exaggerate or compound the consequences required by such narrow purposes in construing rights and obligations affected by the acts of unrecognized governments. Applying these principles, it is insufficient for defendant merely to allege the nonrecognition of the East German Government and the plaintiff’s assignor was organized by and is an arm and instrumentality of such unrecognized East German Government. The lack of jural status of such government or its creature corporation is not determinative of whether transactions with it will be denied enforcement in American courts, so long as the government is not the suitor (Actually, on the present pleadings no issue is raised that plaintiff assignee is that government, or is an arm of that government, or that the assignment to him of the trade acceptance is invalid or does not represent a genuine transfer.)

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Chapter 6: Jurisdiction Over Territory Western Sahara Case 1975 ICJ (Advisory Opinion) [Pursuant to a resolution of the General Assembly, the Court was requested to render an advisory opinion on certain questions affecting the legal status of the Western Sahara, to which Spain, Mauritania, and Algeria asserted sovereign rights. After having considered and rejected a number of preliminary objections to compliance with this request, the Court continued:] 75.

Having established that it is seized of a request for advisory opinion which it is competent to entertain and that it should comply with that request, the Court will now examine the two questions which have been referred to it by General Assembly Resolution 3292 (XXIX). These questions are so formulated that an answer to the second is called for only if the answer to the first is in the negative:

“I. Was Western Sahara (Rio de Oro and Sakiet El Hamra) at the time of colonization by Spain a territory belonging to no one (terra nullius)? “If the answer to the first question is in the negative, “II. What were the legal ties between this territory and the Kingdom of Morocco and the Mauritanian entity?” 77. In the view of the Court, for the purposes of the present Opinion, “the time of colonization by Spain” may be considered as the period beginning in 1884, when Spain proclaimed a protectorate over the Rio de Oro. *** Turing to Question I, the Court observes that the request specifically located the question in the context of “the time of colonization by Spain”, and it therefore seems clear that the words “Was Western Sahara *** a territory belonging to no one (terra nullius)?” have to be interpreted by reference to the law in force at that period. The expression “terra nullius” was a legal term of art employed in connection with “occupation” as one of the accepted legal methods of acquiring sovereignty over territory. “Occupation” being legally an original means of peaceably acquiring sovereignty over territory otherwise than by cession or succession, it was a cardinal condition of a valid “occupation” that the territory should be terra nullius – a territory belonging to no one at the time of the act alleged to constitute the “occupation (cf. Legal

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Status of Eastern Greenland, P.C.I.J., Series A/B, No. 53, pp. 44 f. and 63f.). In the view of the Court, therefore, a determination that Western Sahara was a “terra nullius” at the time of colonization by Spain would be possible only if it were established that at that time the territory belonged to no one in the sense that it was then open to acquisition through the legal process of “occupation.” Whatever differences of opinion there may have been among jurists, the State practice of the relevant period indicates that territories inhabited by tribes or peoples having a social and political organization were not regarded as terra nullius. It shows that in the case of such territories the acquisition of sovereignty was not generally considered as effected unilaterally through “occupation” of terra nullius by original title but through agreements concluded with local rulers. On occasion, it is true, the word “occupation” was used in a non-technical sense denoting simply acquisition of sovereignty; but that did not signify that the acquisition of sovereignty through such agreements with authorities of the country was regarded as an “occupation” of a “terra nullius” in the proper sense of these terms. On the contrary, such agreements with local rulers, whether or not considered as an actual “cession” of the territory, were regarded as derivative roots of title, and not original titles obtained by occupation of terra nullius. In the present instance, the information furnished to the Court shows that at the time of colonization Western Sahara was inhabited by peoples which, if nomadic, were socially and politically organized in tries and under chiefs competent to represent them. Before the Court, differing views were expressed concerning the nature and legal value of agreements between a State and local chiefs. But the Court is not asked by Question I to pronounce upon the legal character or the legality of the titles which led to Spain becoming the administering Power of Western Sahara. It is asked only to state whether Western Sahara (Rio de Oro and Sakiet El Hamra) at the time of colonization by Spain was “a territory belonging to no one (terra nullius).” As to this question, the Court is satisfied that, for the reasons which it has given, its answer must be in the negative. The Court’s answer to Question I is, therefore, in the negative and, in accordance with the terms of the request, it will not turn to Question II. Question II asks the Court to state “what were the legal ties between this territory” – that is, Western Sahara – “and the Kingdom of Morocco and the Mauritanian entity.” The scope of this question depends upon the meaning to be attached to the expression “legal ties” in the context of the time of the colonization of the territory by Spain. That expression, however, unlike “terra nullius” in Question I, was not a term having in itself a very precise meaning. Accordingly, in the view of the Court, the meaning of the expression “legal ties” in Question II has to be found rather in the object and purpose of General Assembly Resolution 3292 (XXIX), by which it was decided to request the present advisory opinion of the Court. Analysis of this resolution, as the Court has already pointed out, shows that the two questions contained in the request have been put to the Court in the context of

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proceedings in the General Assembly directed to the decolonization of Western Sahara in conformity with Resolution 1514 (XV) of 14 December 1960. During the discussion of this item according to Resolution 3292 (XXIX), a legal controversy arose over the status of Western Sahara at the time of its colonization by Spain; and the records of the proceedings make it plain that the “legal controversy” in question concerned pretensions put forward, on the one hand, by Morocco that the territory was then a part of the Sherifian State and, on the other, by Mauritania that the territory then formed part of the Bilad Shinguitti or Mauritania entity. Accordingly, it appears to the Court that in Question II the words “legal ties between this territory and Kingdom of Morocco and the Mauritanian entity” must be understood as referring to such “legal ties” as may affect the policy to be followed in the decolonization of Western Sahara. In this connection, the Court cannot accept the view that the legal ties the General Assembly had in mind in framing Question II were limited to ties established directly with the territory and without reference to the people who may be found in it. Such an interpretation would unduly restrict the scope of the question, since legal ties are normally established in relation to people. The Court further observed that, inasmuch as Question II has its orgin in the contentions of Morocco and Mauritania, it was for them to satisfy the Court in the present proceedings that legal ties existed between Western Sahara and the Kingdom of Morocco or the Mauritanian entity at the time of the colonization of the territory by Spain. Western Sahara (Rio de Oro and Sakiet El Hamra) is a territory having very special characteristics which, at the time of colonization by Spain, largely determined the way of life and social and political organization of the peoples inhabiting it. In consequence, the legal regime of Western Sahara, including its legal relations with neighbouring territories, cannot properly be appreciated without reference to these special characteristics. The territory forms part of the great Sahara desert which extends from the Atlantic coast of Africa to Egypt and the Sudan. At the time of its colonization by Spain, the area of this desert with which the Court is concerned was being exploited, because of its low and spasmodic rainfall, almost exclusively by nomads, pasturing their animals or growing crops as and where conditions were favourable. It may be said that the territory, at the time of its colonization, had a sparse population that, for the most part, consisted of nomadic tribes the members of which traversed the desert on more or less regular routes dictated by the seasons and the wells or water-holes available to them. In general, the Court was informed, the right of pasture was enjoyed in common by these tribes; some areas suitable for cultivation, on the other hand, were subject to a greater degree to separate rights. Perennial water-holes were in principle considered the property of the tribe which put them intocommission, though their use also was open to all, subject to certain customs as to priorities and the amount of water taken. Similarly, many tribes were said to have their recognized burial grounds, which constituted a rallying point for themselves and for allied tribes. Another feature of life in the region, according to the information before the Court, was that inter-tribal conflict was not infrequent. These various points of attraction of a tribe to particular localities were reflected in its nomadic routes. But what is important for present purposes is the fact that the

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sparsity of the resources and the spasmodic character of the rainfall compelled all those nomadic tribes to traverse very wide areas of the desert. In consequence, the nomadic routes of none of them were confined to Western Sahara; some passed also through areas of southern Morocco, or of present-day Mauritania or Algeria, and some even through further countries. All the tribes were of the Islamic faith and the whole territory lay within the Dar al-Islam. In general authority in the tribe was vested in a sheikh, subject to the assent of the “Juma’a” that is, of an assembly of its leading members, and the tribe had its own customary law applicable in conjunction with the Koranic law. Not infrequently one tribe had ties with another, either of dependence or of alliance, which were essentially tribal rather than territorial, ties of allegiance or vassalage. It is in the context of such a territory and such a social and political organization of the population that the Court has to examine the question of the “legal ties” between Western Sahara and the Kingdom of Morocco and the Mauritanian entity at the time of colonization by Spain. At the conclusion of the oral proceedings, as will be seen, Morocco and Mauritania took up what was almost a common position on the answer to be given by the Court on Question II. The contentions on which they respectively base the legal ties which they claim to have had with Western Sahara at the time of its colonization by Spain are, however, different and in some degree opposed. The inferences to be drawn from the information before the Court concerning internal acts of Moroccan sovereignty and from that concerning international acts are, therefore, in accord in not providing indications of the existence, at the relevant period, of any legal tie of territorial sovereignty between Western Sahara and the Moroccan State. The same time, they in accord in providing indications of a legal tie of allegiance between the Sultan of Morocco and some, though only some, of the tribes of the territory, in providing indications of some display of the Sultan’s authority or influence with respect to those tribes. Before attempting, however, to formulate more precisely its conclusions as to the answer to be given to Question II in the case of Morocco, the Court must examine the situation in the territory at the time of colonization in relation to the Mauritanian entity. This is so because the “legal ties” invoked by Mauritania overlap with those invoked by Morocco. The Court will take up the question of what were the legal ties which existed between Western Sahara, at the time of its colonization by Spain, and the Mauritanian entity. As the very formulation of Question II implies, the position of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania in relation to Western Sahara at that date differs from that of Morocco for the reason that there was not then any Mauritanian State in existence. In the present proceedings Mauritania has expressly accepted that the “Mauritanian entity” did not then constitute a State; and also that the present statehood of Mauritania “is not retroactive.” Consequently, it is clear that it is not legal ties of State sovereignty with which the Court is concerned in the case of the “Mauritanian entity” but other legal ties. In the case concerning Raparation for Injuries Suffered in the Service of the United Nations, the Court observed: “The subject of law in any legal system are not necessarily identical in their nature or in the extent of their rights, and their nature

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depends upon the needs of the community” (ICJ Reports 1949, p. 178). In examining the propositions of Mauritania regarding the legal nature of the Bilad Shinguitti or Mauritanian entity, the Court gives full weight both to that observation and to the special characteristics of the Saharan region and peoples with which the present proceedings are concerned. Some criterion has, however, to be employed to determine in any particular case whether what confronts the law is or is not legally an “entity”. The Court, moreover, notes that in the Reparation case the criterion which it applied was to inquire whether the United Nations Organization – the entity involved – was in such a position that it possesses, in regard to its Members, rights which it is entitled to ask them to respect (ibid.) in that opinion, no doubt, the criterion was applied in a somewhat special context. Nevertheless, it expresses the essential test where a group, whether composed of States, of tribes or of individuals, is claimed to be a legal entity distinct from its members. In the present case, the information before the Court discloses that, at the time of the Spanish colonization, there existed may ties of a racial, linguistic, religious, cultural and economic nature between various tribes and emirates whose peoples dwelt in the Saharan region which today is comprised within the Territory of Western Sahara and the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. It also discloses, however, the independence of the emirates and many of the tribes in relation to one another and, despite some forms of common activity, the absence among them of any common institutions or organs, even of a quite minimal character. Accordingly, the Court is unable to find that the information before it provides any basis for considering the emirates and tribes which existed in the region to have constituted, in another phrase used by the Court in the Reparation case, “an entity capable of availing itself of obligations incumbent upon its Members.” Whether the Mauritanian entity is described as the Bilad Shinguitti, or as the Shinguitti “nation,” as Mauritania suggests, or as some form of league or association, the difficulty remains that it did not have the character of a personality or corporate entity distinct from the several emirates and tribes which composed it. The proposition, therefore, that the Bilad Shinguitti should be considered as having been a Mauritanian “entity” enjoying some form of sovereignty in Western Sahara is not one that can be sustained. The Court must conclude that at the time of colonization by Spain there did not exist between the territory of Western Sahara and the Mauritanian entity any tie of sovereignty, or of allegiance of tribes, or of “simple inclusion” in the legal entity. This conclusion does not, however, mean that the reply to Question II should necessarily be that at the time of colonization by Spain no legal ties at all existed between the territory of Western Sahara and the Mauritanian entity. The language employed by the General Assembly in Question II does not appear to be the Court to confine the question exclusively to those legal ties which imply territorial sovereignty. On the contrary, the use of the expression “legal ties” in conjunction with “Mauritanian entity” indicates that Question II envisage the possibility of other ties of legal character. To confine the question to ties of sovereignty would, moreover, be to ignore the special characteristics of the Saharan region and peoples to which reference has been made, and

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also to disregard the possible relevance of other legal ties to the various procedures concerned in the decolonization process. The information before the Court makes it clear that the nomadism of the great majority of the peoples of Western Sahara at the time of its colonization gave rise to certain ties of a legal character between the tribes of the territory and those of neighboring regions of the Bilad Shinguitti. The migration routes of almost all the nomadic tribes of Western Sahara, the Court was informed, crossed what were to become the colonial frontiers and traversed, inter alia, substantial areas of what is today the territory of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The tribes, in their migrations, had grazing pastures, cultivated lands, and wells or water-holes in both territories, and their burial grounds in one or other territory. The basic elements of the nomads’ way of life, as stated earlier, were in some measure the subject of tribal rights, and their use was in general regulated by customs. Furthermre, the relations between all the tribes of the region in such matters as inter-tribal clashes and the settlement of disputes were also governed by a body of inter-tribal customs. Before the time of Western Sahara’s colonization by Spain, those legal ties neither had not could have any other source than the usage of the tribes themselves of Koranic law. Accordingly, although the Bilad Shinguitti has not been shown to have existed as a legal entity, the nomadic people of the Shinguitti country should, in view of the Court, be consideres as having in the relevant through period possessed rights, including some rights relating to the lands through which they migrated. These rights, the Court concludes, constituted legal ties between the territory of Western Sahara and the “Mauritanian entity,” this expression being taken to denote the various tribes living in the territories of the Bilad Shinguitti which are now comprised within the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. They were ties which knew no frontier between the territories and were vital to the very maintenance of life in the region.

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Island of Palmas Case Netherlands v. United States The subject of the dispute is the sovereignty of the Island of Palmas (or Miangas). Palmas is a singe, isolated island. It lies about half-way between Cape San Augustin (Mindanao, Philippines) and the most northerly island of Nanusa (Nanoesa) group (Netherlands East Indies). Both the Netherlands and the United States claim the Island of Palmas as a territory attached for a very long period of time to territories close at hand which are under the sovereignty of the one or the other of them. The United States base its title in the first place on discovery. The existence of sovereignty is confirmed by the Treaty of Munster of 1648 to which Netherlands is a party. Nothing has occurred of a nature to cause the acquired title to disappear when Spain ceded the Philippines to the United States by the Treaty of 10 December 1898. United States maintained that the Palmas forms a geographical part of the Philippine group and in virtue of the principle of contiguity belongs to the Power having sovereignty over the Philippines. The Netherlands argument endeavors to show that the Netherlands have possessed and exercised rights of sovereignty from 1677 to the present day. This sovereignty arose out of conventions entered with native princes of Island of Sangi establishing the suzerainty of the Netherlands over the territories of these princes, including Palmas. Sovereignty in the relations between States signifies independence. Independence in regard to a portion of the globe is the right to exercise therein, to the exclusion of any other State, the functions of a State. If a dispute arises as to the sovereignty over a portion of territory, it is customary to examine which States claiming sovereignty possesses a title superior to the other State. However if the other Party has actually displayed sovereignty, it cannot be sufficient to establish title; it must also be shown that the territorial sovereignty was validly acquired. This demonstration consists in the actual display of State activities, such as belongs only to the territorial sovereign. The title alleged by the United States as the immediate foundation of its claim is cession brought about by the Treaty of Paris. It is evident that Spain could not transfer more rights than she herself possessed. It would seem that the cessionary Power never envisaged that the cession should comprise territories which Spain has not a valid title.

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The United States bases its claim, as successor of Spain, in the first place of discovery. The fact that the island was originally called by a name borrowed from a European language, and referring to the vegetation, serves perhaps to show that no landing was made. Indeed, the reports on record on the discovery of the Island of Palmas state only that the island was seen. No mention was made of landing or of contact with the natives. And in any case no signs of taking possession or of administration by Spain have been shown or even alleged to exist. Discovery alone, without any subsequent act, cannot at the present time prove sovereignty over the Island of Palmas. An inchoate title of discovery must be completed within a reasonable period by the effective occupation of the region claimed to be discovered. No act of occupation or any exercise of sovereignty at Palmas by Spain has been alleged. Moreover, an inchoate title could not prevail over the continuous and peaceful display of authority by the other State. The Netherlands found their claim to sovereignty essentially on the title of peaceful and continuous display of State authority over the island. Since this title would in international law prevail over a title of acquisition of sovereignty not followed by actual display of State authority, it is necessary to ascertain whether the claim of Netherlands is sufficiently established by evidence, and if so, for what period of time. The acts of indirect or direct display of Netherlands sovereignty at Palmas are not numerous and there are considerable gaps in the evidence of continuous display. But apart from the consideration that the manifestations of sovereignty over a small and distant island, inhabited only by natives, cannot be expected to be frequent, it is not necessary that the display of sovereignty should go back to a very distant period. It may suffice that such display existed in the critical period of 1898 and had already existed as continues and peaceful before that date. The display has been open and public in conformity with usages as to exercise of sovereignty over colonial States. The Arbitrator decides in favor of Netherlands setting forth that the Island of Palmas forms in its entirety is a part of Netherlands territory.

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LEGAL STATUS OF EASTERN GREENLAND CASE Permanent Court of International Justice Judgment, April 5, 1933 Series A/B. No.53 (Denmark v. Norway) On July 10th, 1931, the Norwegian Government published a proclamation declaring that it had proceeded to occupy certain territories in Eastern Greenland, on the theory that the territory was terra nullius, which, in the contention of the Danish Government, were subject to the sovereignty of the Crown of Denmark. The first Danish argument is that the Norwegian occupation of part of the East coast of Greenland is invalid because Denmark has claimed and exercised sovereign rights over Greenland as a whole for a long time and has obtained thereby a valid title to sovereignty. The date at which such Danish sovereignty must have existed in order to render the Norwegian occupation invalid is the date at which the occupation took place, viz., July I0th, 1931. The Danish claim is not founded upon any particular act of occupation but alleges - to use the phrase employed in the Palmas Island decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration April 4th, 1928 - a title " founded on the peaceful and continuous display of State authority over the island". It is based upon the view that Denmark now enjoys all the rights which the King of Denmark and Norway enjoyed over Greenland up till 1814. Both the existence and the extent of these rights must therefore be considered, as well as the Danish claim to sovereignty since that date. The issue is to which territory does Greenland belong? It must be borne in mind, however, that as the critical date is July l0th, 1931, it is not necessary that sovereignty over Greenland should have existed throughout the period during which the Danish Government maintains that it was in being. Even if the material submitted to the Court might be thought insufficient to establish the existence of that sovereignty during the earlier periods, this would not exclude a finding that it is sufficient to establish a valid title in the period immediately preceding the occupation. Before proceeding to consider in detail the evidence submitted to the Court, it may be well to state that a claim to sovereignty based not upon some particular act or title such as a treaty of cession but merely upon continued display of authority, involves two elements each of which must be shown to exist: the intention and will to act as sovereign, and some actual exercise or display of such authority.

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Another circumstance which must be taken into account by any tribunal which has to adjudicate upon a claim to sovereignty over a particular territory, is the extent to which the sovereignty is also claimed by some other Power. In most of the cases involving claims to territorial sovereignty which have come before an international tribunal, there have been two competing claims to the sovereignty, and the tribunal has had to decide which of the two is the stronger. One of the peculiar features of the present case is that up to 1931 there was no claim by any Power other than Denmark to the sovereignty over Greenland. Indeed, up till 1921, no Power disputed the Danish claim to sovereignty. It is impossible to read the records of the decisions in cases as to territorial sovereignty without observing that in many cases the tribunal has been satisfied with very little in the way of the actual exercise of sovereign rights, provided that the other State could not make out a superior claim. This is particularly true in the case of claims to sovereignty over areas in thinly populated or unsettled countries. The Court holds that, in consequence of the various undertakings resulting from the separation of Norway and Denmark and culminating in Article 9 of the Convention of September 1st, 1819, Norway has recognized Danish sovereignty over the whole of Greenland and consequently cannot proceed to the occupation of any part thereof. In accepting these bilateral and multilateral agreements as binding upon herself, Norway reaffirmed that she recognized the whole of Greenland as Danish; and thereby she has debarred herself from contesting Danish sovereignty over the whole of Greenland, and, in consequence, from proceeding to occupy any part of it. In view of the above facts, when taken in conjunction with the legislation she had enacted applicable to Greenland generally, the numerous treaties in which Denmark, with the concurrence of the other contracting Party, provided for the non-application of the treaty to Greenland in general, and the absence of all claim to sovereignty over Greenland by any other Power, Denmark must be regarded as having displayed during this period of 1814 to 1915 her authority over the uncolonized part of the country to a degree sufficient to confer a valid title to the sovereignty. Even if the period from 1921 to July 10th, 1931, is taken by itself and without reference to the preceding periods, the conclusion reached by the Court is that during this time Denmark regarded herself as possessing sovereignty over all Greenland and displayed and exercise her sovereign rights to an extent sufficient to constitute a valid title to sovereignty. When considered in conjunction with the facts of the preceding periods, the case in favour of Denmark is confirmed and strengthened. It follows from the above that the Court is satisfied that Denmark has succeeded in establishing her contention that at the critical date, namely, July 10th, 1931, she possessed a valid title to the sovereignty over all Greenland.

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SkyLab Project The Skylab space station was launched May 14, 1973, from the NASA Kennedy Space Center by a huge Saturn V launch vehicle, the moon rocket of the Apollo Space Program. It was America's first experimental space station. Designed for long duration mission, Skylab program objectives were twofold: To prove that humans could live and work in space for extended periods, and to expand our knowledge of solar astronomy well beyond Earth-based observations. However, a problem arose when the air trapped between the meteoroid bumper and spacecraft surface could not escape fast enough during ascent; a pressure differential built up which tore the bumper off. In the process, the thermal protection on the spacecraft surface was badly damaged, and one of the two big solar panels was torn off. As a result, the electric power available for Skylab operation was substantially curtailed, and the interior of Skylab heated up to dangerous levels under the solar heat influx. A frantic effort immediately began on Earth by Marshall, Johnson, and several of the industrial firms to repair the damage as far as possible. Launching of the first astronauts was delayed a few days, but they succeeded in bringing the temperature inside the overheated Skylab back to normal with the help of the sunshield, and they managed to get the normal operational procedures going on the reduced electric power level. The first crew - Conrad, Kerwin, and Weitz - stayed 28 days in Skylab; the second crew - Bean, Garriott, and Lousma - stayed 59 days; and the third crew - Carr, Gibson, and Pogue - 84 days. Damage control proved to be a full success, and the Skylab project turned out to be by far the most prolific and successful scientific and technical enterprise in space. The scientific yield was overwhelming; for example, there were 40,000 photographs taken of the Earth's surface! Our knowledge of the Sun rose by a dramatic jump, the first crystals under microgravity were grown, and our data base for biomedical effects and reactions under the weightlessness of space increased decisively. A total of about ninety different experiments and observations were carried out on Skylab, prepared and monitored by scientists from numerous universities and research institutes. Besides all these accomplishments, there was the assurance for the space engineers that it is really possible to repair a badly damaged spacecraft in orbit, and to restore it to almost normal functioning. Following the final manned phase of the Skylab mission, ground controllers performed some engineering tests of certain Skylab systems--tests that ground personnel were reluctant to do while men were aboard. Results from these tests helped to determine

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causes of failures during the mission and to obtain data on long term degradation of space systems. Upon completion of the engineering tests, Skylab was positioned into a stable attitude and systems were shut down. It was expected that Skylab would remain in orbit eight to ten years. However, in the fall of 1977, it was determined that Skylab was no longer in a stable attitude as a result of greater than predicted solar activity. In 1979, The spacecraft was turned off, its orbit decayed, and it broke up as it reentered the atmosphere. 11 July 1979, most of its pieces burned up in the atmosphere. Of the pieces that survived the heat of reentry , most fell into the Southeastern Indian Ocean. Several tonnes of debris crashed into the Great Australian Desert, having reentered the Earth’s atmosphere several thousand kilometers from its planned orbital track. None caused any damage. This provoked a hurried and rather embarrassed apology to the Australian Government by President Carter. Nevertheless, this event further urged the international community to make way on how to handle liabilities that could be caused by space exploration. The Liability Convention that established an absolute liability for damages on Earth caused by space activities was given more massive attention. Liability based on fault is authorized for damage in space (Article 11). The Liability Convention also provides that nations are jointly and severally liable for damages caused by their cooperative space effort (Articles IV and V). One nation may be held liable for the entire accident.

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Chapter 7: Law of the Sea North Sea Continental Shelf Cases Federal Republic of Germany v. Denmark; Federal Republic of Germany v. The Netherlands International Court of Justice February 20, 1969 General List: Nos. 51 & 52 Judgment of 20 February 1969 A number of bilateral agreements had been made drawing lateral median lines delimiting the North Sea continental shelves of adjacent and opposite States, including two lateral agreements between Netherlands and the Federal Republic of Germany (1964) and Denmark and the Federal Republic of Germany (1965). Each of these last two agreements, however, did no more than draw a dividing line for a short distance from the coast, beginning at the point at which the land boundary of the two States concerned was located. There were no further agreements made. The problem was referred to the International Court of Justice. What principles and rules of international law are applicable to the delimitation as between the Parties of the areas of continental shelf in the North Sea that appertain to each of them beyond the partial boundary already determined? Denmark and Netherlands argued that the “equidistance-special circumstances principles” in Article 6(2) of the 1958 Geneva Convention on the Continental Shelf applied while Federal Republic proposed “the doctrine of the just and equitable share.” The basis of the Federal Republic’s opposition is that the principle has the effect of giving West Germany a smaller continental shelf than it might otherwise obtain. The Court rejected the Wets German proposal and now turns to the legal position regarding equidistance method. The first question to be considered is whether the 1958 Geneva Convention on the Continental Shelf is binding for all Parties, as contended by Denmark and Netherlands. It is admitted on behalf of Denmark and the Netherlands that in these circumstances, the Federal Republic is not contractually bound by it. However, it is still argued that the Convention, or the regime of the Convention, and in particular Article 6, has become binding on the Federal Republic in another way,-namely because by conduct, by public

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statements and proclamations, and in other ways, the Republic has unilaterally assumed the obligations of the Convention; or has manifested its acceptance of conventional regime; or has recognized it as being generally applicable to the delimitation of continental shelf areas. The essential point is that even if these instances of action by non-parties to the Convention were much more numerous than in fact they are, they would not, even in the aggregate, suffice themselves to constitute opinio juris. In order to achieve this, not only must the acts concerned amount to settled practice, but they must also be such, or be carried out in such a way, as to be evidence of a belief that this practice is rendered obligatory by the existence of a rule of law requiring it. The need for such a belief, i.e., the existence of a subjective element, is implicit in the very notion of the opinio juris sive necessitatus. The States concerned must, therefore, feel that they are con forming to what amounts to a legal obligation. The frequency, or even habitual character of the acts is not itself enough. There are many international acts, e.g., in the field of ceremonial and protocol, which are performed invariable, but which are motivated only by considerations of courtesy, convenience of tradition, and not by the sense of legal duty. The Court follows the view adopted by the Permanent Court of International Justice in the Lotus Case, the principle of which is, by analogy, applicable almost word for word [mutatis mutandis]. Applying this dictum, the States concerned agreed to draw or did draw the boundaries concerned according to the principle of equidistance. There is no evidence that they so acted because they felt legally compelled to draw them in this way by reason of a rule of customary law obliging them to do so- especially considering that they might have been motivated by other obvious factors. The Court concludes that if the Geneva Convention was not in its origins or inception declaratory of a mandatory rule of customary international law enjoining the use of equidistance principle, neither has its subsequent effect been constitutive of such rule. The Court found that neither of the approaches argued by the parties was a part of international law, the Court proceeded to lay down principles and rules that apply.

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Chapter 8: Jurisdiction of States CORFU CHANNEL CASE Judgment of 9 April 1949 The facts are as follows. On October 22nd, 1946, two British cruisers and two destroyers, coming from the south, entered the North Corfu Strait. The channel they were following, which was in Albanian waters, was regarded as safe: it had been swept in 1944 and check-swept in 1945. One of the destroyers, the Saumarez, when off Saranda, struck a mine and was gravely damaged. The other destroyer, the Volage, was sent to her assistance and, while towing her, struck another mine and was also seriously damaged. Forty-five British officers and sailors lost their lives, and forty-two others were wounded. An incident had already occurred in these waters on May 15th, 1946: an Albanian battery had fired in the direction of two British cruisers. The United Kingdom Government had protested, stating that innocent passage through straits is a right recognized by international law; the Albanian Government had replied that foreign warships and merchant vessels had no right to pass through Albanian territorial waters without prior authorization; and on August 2nd, 1946, the United Kingdom Government had replied that if, in the future, fire was opened on a British warship passing through the channel, the fire would be returned. Finally, on September 21st, 1946, the Admiralty in London had cabled to the British Commander-in-Chief in the Mediterranean to the following effect: "Establishment of diplomatic relations with Albania is again under consideration by His Majesty's Government who wish to know whether the Albanian Government have learnt to behave themselves. Information is requested whether any ships under your command have passed through the North Corfu Strait since August and, if not, whether you intend them to do so shortly." After the explosions on October 22nd, the United Kingdom Government sent a Note to Tirana announcing its intention to sweep the Corfu Channel shortly. The reply was that this consent would not be given unless the operation in question took place outside Albanian territorial waters and that any sweep undertaken in those waters would be a violation of Albania's sovereignty. The sweep effected by the British Navy took place on November 12th/13th 1946, in Albanian territorial waters and within the limits of the channel previously swept. Twenty-two moored mines were cut; they were mines of the German GY type. The two Parties concluded a Special Agreement asking the Court to give judgment on the following questions: 57

1. Is Albania responsible for the explosions, and is there a duty to pay compensation? 2. Has the United Kingdom violated international law by the acts of its Navy in Albanian waters, first on the day on which the explosions occurred and, secondly, on November 12 and 13, 1946, when it undertook a sweep of the Strait? 1. In its Judgment the Court declared on the first question that Albania was responsible. The Court finds, in the first place, that the explosions were caused by mines belonging to the minefield discovered on November 13th. It is not, indeed, contested that this minefield had been recently laid; it was in the channel, which had been previously swept and check-swept and could be regarded as safe, that the explosions had taken place. The nature of the damage shows that it was due to mines of the same type as those swept on November 13th; finally, the theory that the mines discovered on November 13th might have been laid after the explosions on October 22nd is too improbable to be accepted. In these circumstances the question arises what is the legal basis of Albania's responsibility? The Court does not feel that it need pay serious attention to the suggestion that Albania herself laid the mines: that suggestion was only put forward pro memoria, without evidence in support, and could not be reconciled with the undisputed fact that, on the whole Albanian littoral, there are only a few launches and motor boats. But the United Kingdom also alleged the connivance of Albania: that the mine laying had been carried out by two Yugoslav warships by the request of Albania, or with her acquiescence. The Court finds that this collusion has not been proved. A charge of such exceptional gravity against a State would require a degree of certainty that has not been reached here, and the origin of the mines laid in Albanian territorial waters remains a matter for conjecture. The United Kingdom also argued that, whoever might be the authors of the mine laying, it could not have been effected without Albania's knowledge. True, the mere fact that mines were laid in Albanian waters neither involves prima facie responsibility nor does it shift the burden of proof. On the other hand, the exclusive control exercised by a State within its frontiers may make it impossible to furnish direct proof of facts which would involve its responsibility in case of a violation of international law. The State which is the victim must, in that ease, be allowed a more liberal recourse to inferences of fact and circumstantial evidence; such indirect evidence must be regarded as of especial weight when based on a series of facts, linked together and leading logically to a single conclusion. In the present case two series of facts, which corroborate one another, have to be considered. 58

The first relates to the Albanian Government's attitude before and after the catastrophe. The laying of the mines took place in a period in which it had shown its intention to keep a jealous watch on its territorial waters and in which it was requiring prior authorization before they were entered, this vigilance sometimes going so far as to involve the use of force: all of which render the assertion of ignorance a priori improbable. The second series of facts relates to the possibility of observing the mine laying from the Albanian coast. Geographically, the channel is easily watched: it is dominated by heights offering excellent observation points, and it runs close to the coast (the nearest mine was 500 m. from the shore). 2. In regard to the second question, The Court declared that the United Kingdom did not violate Albanian sovereignty on October 22; but it declared that it violated that sovereignty on November 12th/13th, and that this declaration, in itself, constituted appropriate satisfaction. The Albanian claim to make the passage of ships conditional on a prior authorization conflicts with the generally admitted principle that States, in time of peace, have a right to send their warships through straits used for international navigation between two parts of the high seas, provided that the passage is innocent. The Corfu Strait belongs geographically to this category, even though it is only of secondary importance (in the sense that it is not a necessary route between two parts of the high seas) and irrespective of the volume of traffic passing through it. A fact of particular importance is that it constitutes a frontier between Albania and Greece, and that a part of the strait is wholly within the territorial waters of those States. It is a fact that the two States did not maintain normal relations, Greece having made territorial claims precisely with regard to a part of the coast bordering the strait. However, the Court is of opinion that Albania would have been justified in view of these exceptional circumstances, in issuing regulations in respect of the passage, but not in prohibiting such passage or in subjecting it to the requirement of special authorization. Albania has denied that the passage on October 22 was innocent. She alleges that it was a political mission and that the methods employed, the number of ships, their formation, armament, maneuvers, etc. showed an intention to intimidate. The Court examined the different Albanian contentions so far as they appeared relevant. Its conclusion is that the passage was innocent both in its principle, since it was designed to affirm a right which had been unjustly denied, and in its methods of execution, which were not unreasonable in view of the firing from the Albanian battery on May 15th. As regards the operation on November 12th/13th, it was executed contrary to the clearly expressed wish of the Albanian Government; it did not have the consent of the international mine clearance organizations; it could not be justified as the exercise of the right of innocent passage. The United Kingdom has stated that its object was to secure the 59

mines as quickly as possible for fear lest they should be taken away by the authors of the mine laying or by the Albanian authorities: this was presented either as a new and special application of the theory of intervention, by means of which the intervening State was acting to facilitate the task of the international tribunal, or as a method of self-protection or self-help. The Court cannot accept these lines of defense. It can only regard the alleged right of intervention as the manifestation of a policy of force which cannot find a place in international law. As regards the notion of self-help, the Court is also unable to accept it: between independent States the respect for territorial sovereignty is an essential foundation for international relations. Certainly, the Court recognizes the Albanian Government's complete failure to carry out its duties after the explosions and the dilatory nature of its diplomatic notes as extenuating circumstances for the action of the United Kingdom. But, to ensure respect for international law, of which it is the organ, the Court must declare that the action of the British Navy constituted a violation of Albanian sovereignty. This declaration is in accordance with the request made by Albania through her counsel and is in itself appropriate satisfaction.

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THE LOTUS CASE The Lotus Case (France v. Turkey) 1927 P.C.I.J. (Ser. A) No. 10 A French mail-steamer Lotus, on the way to Constantinople, collided with the Turkish cutter Boz-Kourt on the high seas. The Boz-Kourt sank with the loss of eight sailors, all Turkish nationals. Upon arrival of Lotus in Constantinople, Turkish authorities arrested Lieuteneant Demons, the French Officer in charge of Lotus at the time of the collision and Hassan Bey, captain of Boz-Kourt. Both were charged with manslaughter. Lieutenant Demons argued that the Turkish Courts had no jurisdiction. This argument was rejected and he was sentenced to eighty (80) days of imprisonment and a fine of twenty-two (22) pounds. The French Government objected to the actions of the Turkish Court. The French and the Turks agreed to submit the dispute to the Permanent Court of International Justice. The French Government contends that the Turkish Court, in order to have jurisdiction, should be able to point to some title to jurisdiction recognized by international law in favor of Turkey. While the Turkish Government believes that it has jurisdiction as long as it does not conflict with international law. The issue is whether Turkey has jurisdiction over the alleged offense committed on the high seas between two vessels flying different flags? Turkey, in virtue of the discretion which international law leaves to every sovereign State, by instituting the criminal proceeding has not acted in a manner contrary to the principles of international law. There is no rule of international law in regard to collision cases to the effect that criminal proceedings are exclusively within the jurisdiction of the State whose flag is flown. Though it is true that in all systems of law the principle of the territorial character of criminal law is fundamental, it is not an absolute principle of international law and by no mean coincides with territorial sovereignty. The Court does not think it necessary to consider the French contention that a State cannot punish offenses committed abroad by a foreigner simply by reason of the nationality of the victim.

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In virtue if the principle of the freedom of the seas, the absence of any territorial sovereignty upon the high seas, no State may exercise any kind of jurisdiction over foreign vessels upon them. But it by no mean follows that a State can never in its own territory exercise jurisdiction over acts, which have occurred on board a foreign ship on high seas. . all that can be said is that by virtue of the principle of the freedom of the seas, a ship is placed in the same position as national territory. It follows that what occurs on board a vessel upon high seas must be regarded as if it occurred on the territory of the State whose flag the ship flies. If therefore, a guilty act committed on the high seas produces its effects on a vessel flying another flag or in foreign territory, the same principles must be applied and the conclusion must therefore be drawn that there is no rule of international law prohibiting the State to which the ship on which the effects of the offense have taken place belongs, from regarding the offense as having been committed in its territory and prosecuting the delinquent.

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TRAIL SMELTER ARBITRATION (US V. CANADA) The Government of the United States has complained to the Government of Canada that fumes discharged from the smelter of the consolidated Mining and Smelting company at Trail, British Columbia, have been causing damage in the State of Washington. The Smelter has become one of the best and largest equipped smelting plants. The smelter greatly increased its daily smelting of zinc and lead ores. This increased product resulted in more sulphur dioxide fumes and higher concentrations being emitted in to the air; and it is claimed by one government that the added height of the stacks increased the area of damage of the United States. Both parties decided to conclude a convention for the settlement of the following: 1. Whether damage caused by the Trail Smelter in Washington has occurred since the first day of January of 1932 and if so, what indemnity should be paid therefore? 2. If answer to the first part of the preceding Question is in the affirmative, whether Trail Smelter be required to refrain from causing damage in Washington in the future and if, so to what extent? 3. What measures should be adopted by Trail Smelter? 4. What indemnity should be paid on account of any decision or decision rendered by the Tribunal? The issue is whether or not the responsibility of Canada to the alleged damage occurring in the territory of US due to an agency situated in the territory of the former Canada. As between the two countries involved, each has an equal interest that if a nuisance is proved, the indemnity to damaged parties for proven damage shall be just and adequate and each has also an equal interest that unproved or unwarranted claims shall not be allowed.

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A State owes at all times a duty to protect other States against injurious acts by individuals from within its jurisdiction. The desire to reach a solution just to all parties concerned must be upheld. Trails Smelter 뭩 operation shall continue but under such restrictions and limitations as would prevent damage in the future in the United States. As early as 1925, the Smelter company had made an investigation and was convinced that it had caused damaged and negotiated with the property owners. Subsequently, it has been duly proven that the trail Smelter had cause damage to Washington since January 1, 1932. Canada is responsible in international law for the conduct of the Trail Smelter. It is the duty of Canada to see to it that this conduct should be in conformity with the obligation of Canada under international law. The Trail Smelter was required to refrain from causing any damage fumes in the State of Washington.

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BLACKMER V U.S Petitioner, Harry M. Blackmer, a citizen of the United States and who is a resident of Paris, France, was adjudged guilty of contempt of the Supreme Court of the district of Columbia for failure to respond to subpoenas served upon him in France and requiring him to appear as witness on behalf of the United States at a criminal trial in that court. Two subpoenas were issued, for appearances at different times, and there was a seperate proceeding with respect to each. The two cases were heard together, and a fine of $30,000.00 with cost was imposed in each case,to be satisfied out of the property of the petitioner which had been seized by ther order of the court.The subpoenas were issued and served, and the proceedings to punish for contempt were taken, under the provision of the Statute. The statute provided that whenever the attendance at the trial of a criminal action of a witness abroad, who is a citizen of the United States or domeciled therein, is desired by the Attorney General, or any assistant or district attorney acting under him, the judge of the court in which the action is pendiong may order a subpoena to issue, to be addrresed to a Consul of the United States and to be served by him personally upon the witness with a tender of travelling expenses. The issue is whether or not the United States can exercise authority or jurisdiction over the person of its citizen who resides in foreign country. The Court held that under the Nationality Principle, every state has jurisdiction over its nationals even when those nationals are outside the state.While it appears that the petitioner removed his residence to France, it is undisputed that he was, and continued to be, a citizen of the United States.He continued to owe allegiance to the United States.By virtue of the obligations of citizenship, the U.S. retained its authority over him, and he was bound by its laws made applicable to him in a foreign country.Thus, although resident abroad, the petitioner remained subject to the jurisdiction and authority of the U.S.

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THE NOTTEBOHM CASE Liechtenstein v Guatemala 1955 I.C.J. 4 Nottebohm, born at Hamburg, was still a German national when, in October 1939, he applied for naturalization in Liechtenstein. In 1905 he went to Guatemala, which he made the centre of his business activities, which increased and prospered. He sometimes went to Germany on business and to other countries for holidays, and also paid a few visits to Liechtenstein, where one of his brothers had lived since 1931; but he continued to have his fixed abode in Guatemala until 1943, that is to say, until the events which constituted the basis of the present dispute. In 1939 he left Guatemala at approximately the end of March; he seems to have gone to Hamburg and to have paid a few brief visits to Liechtenstein, where he was at the beginning of October 1939. It was then, on 9th October, 1939, a little more than a month after the opening of the Second World War, marked by Germany's attack on Poland, that he applied for naturalization in Liechtenstein. In his application for naturalization, Nottebohm also applied for the previous conferment of citizenship of Mauren, a commune of Liechtenstein. He sought dispensation from the condition of three years' prior residence, without indicating the special circumstances warranting such a waiver. He undertook to pay (in Swiss francs) 25,000 francs to the Commune and 12,500 francs to the State, the costs of the proceedings, and an annual naturalization tax of 1,000 francs - subject to the proviso that the payment of these taxes was to be set off against ordinary taxes which would fall due if the applicant took up residence in Liechtenstein - and to deposit as security the sum of 30,000 Swiss francs. A Document dated 15th October, 1939 certifies that on that date the citizenship of Mauren had been conferred upon him. A Certificate of 17th October, 1939 evidences the payment of the taxes required to be paid. On 20th October Nottebohm took the oath of allegiance and on 23rd October an arrangement concerning liability to taxation was concluded. A Certificate of Nationality was also produced to the effect that Nottebohm had been naturalized by a Supreme Resolution of the Prince of 13th October, 1939. Nottebohm then obtained a Liechtenstein passport and had it visa-ed by the Consul General of Guatemala in Zurich on 1st December, 1939, and returned to Guatemala at the beginning of 1940, where he resumed his former business activities. The issues are: 1. whether the naturalization thus granted could be validly invoked against Guatemala; and

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2. whether it bestowed upon Liechtenstein a sufficient title to exercise protection in respect of Nottebohm as against Guatemala and therefore entitled it to seize the Court of a claim relating to him. In order to establish that the Application must be held admissible, Liechtenstein argued that Guatemala had formerly recognized the naturalization which it now challenged. Examining Guatemala's attitude towards Nottebohm since his naturalization, the Court considered that Guatemala had not recognized Liechtenstein's title to exercise protection in respect to Nottebohm. It then considered whether the granting of nationality by Liechtenstein directly entailed an obligation on the part of Guatemala to recognize its effect, in other words, whether that unilateral act by Liechtenstein was one which could be relied upon against Guatemala in regard to the exercise of protection. The Court dealt with this question without considering that of the validity of Nottebohm's naturalization according to the Law of Liechtenstein. Nationality is within the domestic jurisdiction of the State, which settles, by its own legislation, the rules relating to the acquisition of its nationality. But the issue which the Court must decide is not one which pertains to the legal system of Liechtenstein; to exercise protection is to place oneself on the plane of international law. International practice provides many examples of acts performed by States in the exercise of their domestic jurisdiction which do not necessarily or automatically have international effect. When two States have conferred their nationality upon the same individual and this situation is no longer confined within the limits of the domestic jurisdiction of one of these States but extends to the international field, international arbitrators or the Courts of third States which are called upon to deal with this situation would allow the contradiction to subsist if they confined themselves to the view that nationality is exclusively within the domestic jurisdiction of the State. In order to resolve the conflict they have, on the contrary, sought to ascertain whether nationality has been conferred in circumstances such as to give rise to an obligation on the part of the respondent State to recognize the effect of that nationality. In order to decide this question, they have evolved certain criteria. They have given their preference to the real and effective nationality, that which accorded with the facts, that based on stronger factual ties between the person concerned and one of these States whose nationality is involved. Different factors are taken into consideration, and their importance will vary from one case to the next: there is the habitual residence of the individual concerned but also the centre of his interests, his family ties, his participation in public life, attachment shown by him for a given country and inculcated in his children, etc. The same tendency prevails among writers. Moreover, the practice of certain States, which refrain from exercising protection in favour of a naturalized person when the latter has in fact severed his links with what is no longer for him anything but his nominal country, manifests the view that, in order to be invoked against another State, nationality must correspond with a factual situation. The character thus recognized on the international level as pertaining to nationality is in no way inconsistent with the fact that international law leaves it to each

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State to lay down the rules governing the grant of its own nationality. This is so failing any general agreement on the rules relating to nationality. It has been considered that the best way of making such rules accord with the varying demographic conditions in different countries is to leave the fixing of such rules to the competence of each State. But, on the other hand, a State cannot claim that the rules it has laid down are entitled to recognition by another State unless it has acted in conformity with this general aim of making the nationality granted accord with an effective link between the State and the individual. According to the practice of States, nationality constitutes the juridical expression of the fact that an individual is more closely connected with the population of a particular State. Conferred by a State, it only entitles that State to exercise protection if it constitutes a translation into juridical terms of the individual's connection with that State. Is this the case as regards Mr. Nottebohm? At the time of his naturalization, does Nottebohm appear to have been more closely attached by his tradition, his establishment, his interests, his activities, his family ties, his intentions for the near future, to Liechtenstein than to any other State? In this connection the Court stated the essential facts of the case and pointed out that Nottebohm always retained his family and business connections with Germany and that there is nothing to indicate that his application for naturalization in Liechtenstein was motivated by any desire to dissociate himself from the Government of his country. On the other hand, he had been settled for 34 years in Guatemala, which was the centre of his interests and his business activities. He stayed there until his removal as a result of war measures in 1943, and complains of Guatemala's refusal to readmit him. Members of Nottebohm's family had, moreover, asserted his desire to spend his old age in Guatemala. In contrast, his actual connections with Liechtenstein were extremely tenuous. If Nottebohm went to chat country in 1946, this was because of the refusal of Guatemala to admit him. There is thus the absence of any bond of attachment with Liechtenstein, but there is a long-standing and close connection between him and Guatemala, a link which his naturalization in no way weakened. That naturalization was not based on any real prior connection with Liechtenstein, nor did it in any way alter the manner of life of the person upon whom it was conferred in exceptional circumstances of speed and accommodation. In both respects, it was lacking in the genuineness requisite to an act of such importance, if it is to be enticed to be respected by a State in the position of Guatemala. It was granted without regard to the concept of nationality adopted in international relations. Naturalization was asked for not so much for the purpose of obtaining a legal recognition of Nottebohm's membership in fact in the population of Liechtenstein, as it was to enable him to substitute for his status as a national of a belligerent State that of the subject of a neutral State, with the sole aim of thus coming within the protection of Liechtenstein but not of becoming wedded to its traditions, its interests, its way of life or of assuming the obligations - other than fiscal obligations - and exercising the rights pertaining to the status thus acquired. For these reasons the Court held the claim of Liechtenstein to be inadmissible.

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ASYLUM CASE Colombian-Peruvian Asylum case Judgment of 20 November 1950 (by R. De Guzman) On October 3, 1948, a military rebellion broke out in Peru; it was suppressed the same day. On the following day, a decree was published charging a political party, the American People's Revolutionary Party, with having prepared and directed the rebellion. The head of the Party, Victor Raúl Haya de la Torre, was denounced as being responsible. With other members of the party, he was prosecuted on a charge of military rebellion. As he was still at liberty on November 16th, summonses were published ordering him to appear before the Examining Magistrate. On January 3, 1949, he was granted asylum in the Colombian Embassy in Lima. Meanwhile, on October 27, 1948, a Military Junta had assumed power in Peru and had published a decree providing for Courts-martial for summary judgment in cases of rebellion, sedition and rioting; but this decree was not applied to the legal proceedings against Haya de la Torre and others, and it has been declared before the Court that this Decree was not applicable to the said proceedings. Furthermore, during the period from October 4th to the beginning of February, 1949, Peru was in a state of siege. On January 4, 1949, the Colombian Ambassador in Lima informed the Peruvian Government of the asylum granted to Haya de la Torre, at the same time he asked that a safe-conduct be issued to enable the refugee to leave the country. On January 14, he further stated that the refugee had been qualified as a political refugee. The Peruvian Government disputed this qualification and refused to grant a safe-conduct. A diplomatic correspondence ensued which terminated in the signature, in Lima, on August 31, 1949, of an Act by which the two Governments agreed to submit the case to the International Court of Justice. Colombia maintained before the Court that, according to the Convention in force, the Bolivarian Agreement of 1911 on Extradition, the Havana Convention of 1928 on Asylum the Montevideo Convention of 1933 on Political Asylum and according to American International Law, she was entitled to qualify the nature of the offense for the purposes of the asylum. Colombia also maintained that Peru was under the obligation to issue a safeconduct to enable the refugee to leave the country in safety. In a counter-claim, Peru had asked the Court to declare that asylum had been granted to Haya de la Torre in violation of the Havana Convention, first, because Haya de

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la Torre was accused, not of a political offense but of a common crime and, secondly, because the urgency which was required under the Havana Convention in order to justify asylum was absent in that case. The first of the Treaties which it invoked - the Bolivarian Agreement, which is the Treaty on extradition - confined itself in one Article to recognizing the institution of asylum in accordance with the principles of international law. But these principles do not entail the right of unilateral qualification. On the other hand, when the Bolivarian Agreement laid down rules for extradition, it was not possible to deduce from them conclusions concerning diplomatic asylum. In the case of extradition, the refugee was on the territory of the State of refuge: if asylum were granted to him, such decision would not derogate from the sovereignty of the States in which the offense was committed. On the contrary, in the case of diplomatic asylum, the refugee was on the territory of the State in which he had committed the offense: the decision to grant asylum derogated from the sovereignty of the territorial State and removed the offender from the jurisdiction of that State. As for the second treaty invoked by Colombia the Havana Convention it did not recognize the right of unilateral qualification either explicitly or implicitly. The third treaty - the Convention of Montevideo - had not been ratified by Peru and could be invoked against that country. Finally, as regarded American international law, Colombia had not proved the existence, either regionally or locally, of a constant and uniform practice of unilateral qualification as a right of the State of refuge and an obligation upon the territorial State. The facts submitted to the Court disclosed too much contradiction and fluctuation to make it possible to discern therein a usage peculiar to Latin America and accepted as law. It therefore followed that Colombia, as the State granting asylum, was not competent to qualify the nature of the offense by a unilateral and definitive decision binding on Peru. The Court, setting aside for the time being the question of whether asylum was regularly granted and maintained, noted that the clause in the Havana Convention which provided guaranties for the refugee was applicable solely to a case where the territorial State demanded the departure of the refugee from its territory: it was only after such a demand that the diplomatic Agent who granted asylum could, in turn, require a safeconduct. There was, of course, a practice according to which the diplomatic Agent immediately requested a safe-conduct, which was granted to him: but this practice, which was to be explained by reasons of expediency, laid no obligation upon the territorial State. In the present case, Peru had not demanded the departure of the refugee and was therefore not bound to deliver a safe-conduct. In this connection, the Court noted that the only charge against the refugee was that of military rebellion, which was not a common crime. Consequently, the Court rejected the counter-claim of Peru on that point, declaring it to be ill-founded.

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On the question of urgency, the Court, having observed that the essential justification of asylum lay in the imminence or persistence of a danger to the person of the refugee, analyzed the facts of the case. Three months had elapsed between the military rebellion and the grant of asylum. There was no question of protecting Haya de la Torre for humanitarian considerations against the violent and uncontrolled action of irresponsible elements of the population, the danger which confronted Haya de la Torre was that of having to face legal proceedings. The Havana Convention was not intended to protect a citizen who had plotted against the institutions of his country from regular legal proceedings. It was not sufficient to be accused of a political offense in order to be entitled to receive asylum; asylum could only intervene against the action of justice in cases where arbitrary action was substituted for the rule of law. It had not been proved that the situation in Peru at the time implied the subordination of justice to the executive or the abolition of judicial guarantees. Besides, the Havana Convention was unable to establish a legal system which would guarantee to persons accused of political offenses the privilege of evading their national jurisdiction. Such a conception would come into conflict with one of the oldest traditions of Latin America, that of nonintervention. For if the Havana Convention had wished to ensure general protection to all persons prosecuted for political crimes in the course of revolutionary events, for the sole reason that it should be presumed that such events interfere with the administration of justice, this would lead to foreign interference of a particularly offensive nature in the domestic affairs of States.

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MEJOFF V DIRECTOR OF PRISONS 90 Phil 70 (1951) The petitioner Boris Mejoff is an alien of Russian descent who was brought to this country from Shanghai as a secret operative by the Japanese forces during the latter's regime in these Islands. Upon liberation he was arrested aa a Japanese spy, by U. S. Army Counter Intelligence Corps. Later he was handed to the Commonwealth Government for disposition in accordance with Commonwealth Act No. 682. Thereafter the People's Court ordered his release. But the deportation board taking his case up, found that having no travel documents Mejoff was illegally in this country, and consequently referred the matter to the immigration authorities. After the corresponding investigation, the Board oF Commissioners of Immigration on April 5, 1948, declared that Mejoff had entered the Philippines illegally in 1944, without inspection and admission by the immigration officials at a designated port of entry and, therefore, it ordered that he be deported on the first available transportation to Russia. The petitioner was then under custody, he having been arrested on March 18, 1948. In May, 1948, he was transferred to the Cebu Provincial Jail together with three other Russians to await the arrival of some Russian vessels. In July and in August of that year two boats of Russian nationality called at the Cebu Port. But their masters refused to take petitioner and his companions alleging lack of authority to do so. In October, 1948, after repeated failures to ship this deportee abroad, the authorities removed him to Bilibid Prison at Muntinglupa where he has been confined up to the present time, inasmuch as the Commissioner of Immigration believes it is for the best interest of the country to keep him under detention while arrangements for his deportation are being made. It is contended on behalf of petitioner that having been brought to the Philippines legally by the Japanese forces, he may not now be deported. It is enough to say that the argument would deny to this Government the power and the authority to eject from the Islands any and all of that member of the Nipponese Army of occupation who may still be found hiding in remote places. Petitioner likewise contends that he may not be deported because the statutory period to do that under the laws has long expired. Under section 37 of the Philippine Immigration Act of 1940 any alien who enters this country "without inspection and admission by the immigration authorities at a designated point of entry" is subject to deportation within five years. "It must be admitted that temporary detention is a necessary step in the process of exclusion or expulsion of undesirable aliens and that pending arrangements for his deportation, the Government has the right to hold the undesirable alien under

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confinement for a reasonable length of time. However, under established precedents, too long a detention

FILARTIGA V PEÑA-IRALA 63 F.2d 876 (1980) This was an action brought by two Paraguay nationals, the father and sister of a 17year old Paraguayan, who was allegedly tortured to death by the defendant Pena-Irala who was the Inspector-General of the Police then. The issue is whether or not torture under the color of authority violates the universal principles of international law without regard of of the nationality of the parties. The Court ruled that deliberate torture under the color of official authority, as what had happened in the instant case, violates the universal principles of international law regardless of the nationality of the parties. As basis for the conclusion, the Court referred to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, particularly the 1975 Declaration on the Protection of all Persons from Torture, that the prohibition of torture has become part of customary international law. Finally, the Court found little difficulty in resolving the act of torture in this case applying the universal renunciation of such act in the modern usage and practice of nations.

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THE EICHMANN CASE 36 Intl. L. Rep. 5 (Israel, Dist. Ct. Jerusalem 1961)

Adolf Eichmann was a high ranking officer who played vital role in the planning and implementation of the persecution of Jews in Germany, Poland, Hungary and several other countries before and during World War II. At the end of the war, he escaped to Argentina where he lived and work under an alias until May, 1960 when he was kidnapped by Israeli agents. Argentina complained to the UN Security Council about this clear violation of Argentine sovereignty. The Security Council, while making it clear that it did not condone Eichmann’s crimes, declared that: “Acts such as that under consideration i.e. the kidnapping of Eichmann, which affect sovereignty of a member state and therefore cause international friction, may, if repeated, endanger international peace and security.” The Security Council requested the Government of Israel “to make appropriate reparation in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the rules of international law.” Argentina did not demand the return of Eichmann, and in August 1960, the Argentine and Israeli governments resolved in a joint communiqué ‘to regard as closed the incident which arose out of the actions taken by Citizens of Israel, which infringed the fundamental rights of the State of Argentina.” Eichmann was then tried in Israel under Israel’s Nazi Collaborators Law. He was found guilty and the conviction was subsequently upheld by the Supreme Court of Israel. On May 31, 1962, Eichmann went to the gallows, the only person ever formally executed by the State of Israel. The issue is whether or not in the event of a conflict between local legislation and international law, it is an imperative to give reference to the principles of international law. The Supreme Court of Israel held that in case of conflict between local legislation and international law, it is not an imperative to give reference to international law. According to the Law of Israel, the relationship between municipal and international law is governed by the following rules: • •

The principle in question becomes incorporated into the municipal law only after it has achieved general international recognition. However, this only applies when there is no conflict between the provisions of municipal law and a rule of international law. When conflict arises, it is the court that has a duty to give preference to and apply the laws of the local legislature.

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It is contended that we must apply international law as it is, and not as it ought to be from the moral point of view, then we must reply that precisely from a legal point of view there is no such provision in it; it follows automatically that the principle cannot be deemed to be part of the Israel municipal law by virtue of international law, but that the extent of its application in this country is the same as in England. The contention that since the State of Israel had not existed at the time of the commission of the offense, its competence to impose punishment therefore is limited to its own citizens is equally unfounded. This argument too must be rejected on the basis that the lower court had to apply local legislation. On the question of the jurisdiction of a state to punish persons who are not its nationals for acts committed beyond its borders, there is as yet no intentional accord. It follows that in the absence of general agreement as to the existence of such a rule of international law, there is, again, no escape from the conclusion that it cannot be deemed to be embodied in Israel municipal law, and therefore on that ground, too, contention fails. The rules of the law of nations are not derived solely from international treaties and crystallized international usage. In the absence of a supreme legislative authority and international codes the process of its evolution resembles that of the common law; its rules are established from case to case, by analogy with the rules embodied on treaties and international custom, on the basis of general principles of law recognized by civilized nations, and in the light of the vital international needs that impel an immediate solution. It has also been taken into consideration the possible desire of other countries to try the appellant in so far as the crimes were committed in those countries against conducting trial in Israel. It is argued by the counsel that Article 6 of the Genocide Convention provides that a person accused of this crime shall be tried by a court of competent jurisdiction of the state in which it was committed. Article 6 imposes upon the parties contractual obligation with future effect, obligations which bind them to prosecute crimes of “genocide” which will be committed within their territories in the future. The obligation, however, has nothing to do with the universal power vested in every state to prosecute for crimes of this type committed in the past, a power which is based on customary international law. The State of Israel was entitled, pursuant to the principle of universal jurisdiction and acting in the capacity of guardian of international law and agent for its enforcement, to try the appellant. This being so is immaterial that the State of Israel did not exist at the time the offense was committed. The jurisdiction was automatically vested in the State of Israel on its establishment in 1948 as a sovereign State. Therefore, in bringing the appellant to trial, it functioned as an organ of international law and acted to enforce the provisions thereof, through, its own law. Consequently, it is immaterial that the crimes in question were committed, when the State of Israel did not exist, and outside its territory. The moment it

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is admitted that the State of Israel possesses criminal jurisdiction both according to local law and according to the law of nations, it must also be conceded that the court is not bound to investigate the manner and legality of the detention.

UNITED STATES V FAWAZ YUNIS 681 F. Supp. 8961 (1988) Doctrine: The Passive Personality Principle On June 11, 1985, a Jordanian civil aircraft, the Royal Jordanian airlines flight 402 was hijacked by several Arab men, whom the defendant was one of them. The aircraft was at the Beirut International airport at Beirut, Lebanon , scheduled departure to Amman, Jordan was stormed by the defendant and his group, ordering the pilot to fly the plane to Tunis, Tunisia where a meeting of the Arab League Conference was underway. The passengers are held as hostages including Americans. When the aircraft was nearing Tunis, it was denied to land on Tunis therefore, the plane went back to Beirut. When they landed, they ordered the hostages to get out of the plane and called an impromptu press conference. After the press conference, the hijackers blew the plane and escape. Yunis was caught by the U.S. and was tried. Yunis moved to dismiss the entire case against him because U.S. has no jurisdiction in his person. U.S. Federal Courts has no jurisdiction because they have no jurisdiction to prosecute foreign national for crimes committed in foreign airspace and on foreign soil. He further claims that the presence of the Americans in the plane as hostages is an insufficient basis for exercise of jurisdiction. The issue is whether or not U.S. has a basis to exercise jurisdiction over the defendant. The Court held the U.S. has jurisdiction over the defendant even though the crime was committed outside the jurisdiction of U.S. under the Passive Personality Principle. This principle states that a state may apply law, particularly criminal law, to an act committed outside its territory by a person not its national where the victim of the act was a national of it. Under the facts and circumstance of the case, its obvious that some American nationals where held hostage by the defendant when the defendant and his group had hijacked the aircraft. Although the principle has not been ordinarily accepted for ordinary torts or crimes, but when it come to terrorist and other organized attacks on a state’s national by reason of their nationality, or to assassination of a state’s diplomatic representatives or other officials, such principle can be applied. U.S. has jurisdiction over Yunis.

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United States, appellee v. Ah Sing, appellant Appellant Ah Sing is a subject of China employed as a fireman on the steamship Sun Chang. The Sun Chang is a foreign steamer which arrived at the port of Cebu on April 25, 1917 from Saigon. Appellant bought eight cans of opium in Saigon and brought them on board the steamship which was discovered by authorities upon making a search on the steamship. The appellant confessed that he was the owner of the opium. The appellant was convicted for illegal importation of opium into the Philippine Islands. Appellant now contends the jurisdiction of the Philippine courts to try the case, he being a Chinese national on board a foreign vessel. The issue of the case is whether the Philippines has criminal jurisdiction over a foreign subject aboard a foreign vessel. Although the mere possession of a thing prohibited in the Philippines aboard a foreign vessel in transit, in any of the ports, does not, as a general rule, constitute a crime triable by the courts of this country, on account of such vessel being considered as an extension of its own nationality, the same does not apply when the article is landed from the vessel upon Philippine soil, thus committing an open violation of the laws of the land. The vessel was not merely in transit, but rather, its route was from and to Saigon and Cebu, when the cans of opium were discovered by authorities at the port. Without an agreement under an international treaty, the court of the place where the crime has committed has competent jurisdiction to try the same.

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UNITED STATES V ALVAREZ-MACHAIN 504 U.S. 655 (1992) Accused, Alvarez-Machain, was indicted for allegedly participating in the kidnap and murder of United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) special agent and a Mexican pilot. The DEA believed that Alvarez-Machain, through his expertise as a medical doctor, participated in the murder by prolonging the agent's life so that others could further torture and interrogate him. Respondent was forcibly abducted from Mexico to Texas, where he was arrested by DEA officials. Thereafter, he moved to dismiss the indictment holding that his abduction constituted outrageous governmentfal conduct, and that the District Court lacked jurisdiction to try him because the abduction violated the extradition treaty between the United States and Mexico. The issue is whether or not the US court has jurisdiction to try the case as well as over the person of the accused. Applying the ruling in Ker v. Illinois, 119 U.S. 436 (1886), the Court held in affirmative that the power of a court to try a person for crime is not impaired by the fact that he had been brought to trial within the court's jurisdiction by reason of his forcible abduction. Such forcible abduction is no sufficient reason why the party should not answer when brought within the jurisdiction of the court which has the right to try him for such an offense, and presents no valid objections to his trial in such court. Furthermore, the Court said that there was nothing in the US-Mexico Extradition Treaty that said about the obligations of the United States and Mexico to refrain from forcible abductions of people from the territory of the other nation, or the consequences under the Treaty if such forcible abduction would occur.

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SEC. OF JUSTICE V HON. RALPH C. LANTION G.R. No. 139465 October 17, 2000 The jugular issue is whether or not the private respondent is entitled to due process right to notice and hearing during the evaluation stage of the extradition process. We hold that the private respondent is bereft of the right to notice and hearing during the evaluation stage of the extradition process based on the following grounds: First: There is no provision in the RP-US Extradition Treaty and in P.D. 1069 which gives an extradite the right to demand from the petitioner Secreatary of Justice copies of the extradition request from the US Government and its supporting documents and to comment thereon while the request is still undergoing evaluation. Second: All treaties, including the RP-US Extradition Treaty, should be interpreted in light of their intent. Nothing less than the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties to which the Philippines is a signatory provides that a treaty shall be interpreted in good =faith in accordance with the ordinary meaning to be give to the terms of the treaty in their context and in light of its object and purpose. It ought to follow that the RP-US Extradition Treaty calls for an interpretation that will minimize if not prevent the escape of extradites from the long arm of the law and expedite the trial. Third: The rule is recognized that while courts have the power to interpret the treaties, the meaning given them by the departments of governments particularly charged with their negotiation and enforcement is accorded great weight. Our executive department of government, thru Department of Foreign Affairs and the Department of Justice had steadfastly maintained that the RP-US Extradition Treaty and P.D. No. 1069 do not grant the private respondent a right to notice and hearing during the evaluation stage of an extradition process. This understanding of the treaty is shared by the US government, the other party to the treaty. This interpretation of the two governments cannot be given scant significance. It will be presumptuous for the court to assume that both governments did not understand the terms of the treaty they concluded. Fourth: Private respondent however, peddles the postulate the he must afforded the right to notice and hearing as required by our constitution. He buttresses his position by likening an extradition proceeding to a criminal proceeding and the evaluation stage to a preliminary investigation. We are not persuaded. An extradition proceeding is a sui generis. It is not a criminal proceeding which will call into operation all the right of an accused as guaranteed by the Bill of Rights. The process of extradition does not involve the determination of the guilt or innocence of an accused. His guilt or innocence shall be d=adjudged by the court of the state he will be extradited. Hence, as a rule, constitutional 79

right shall only be relevant to determine the guilt or innocence of an accused cannot be invoke by an extradite especially by one whose extradition papers are still undergoing evaluation. Fifth: Private respondent would also impress upon the court the urgency of his right to notice and hearing considering the alleged threat to his liberty. The supposed threat to private respondent’s liberty is perceived to come from several provisions of the Extradition Treaty and its implementing law which allow provisional arrest and temporary detention. However, both the RP-US Extradition Treaty and P.D. 1069 clearly provide that private respondent may be provisionally arrested only pending receipt of the request for extradition. Our DFA has long received the extradition request from the United States and has turned it over to the DOJ. It is undisputed that until today, the United States has not requested for privates respondent’s provisional arrest. Therefore, the threat to private respondent’s liberty has passed. It is more imagined than real. Sixth: To be sure, private respondent’s plea for due process deserves serious consideration involving as it does his primordial right to liberty. His plea to due process however, collides with the important state interest which cannot also be ignored for they serve the interest of the greater majority. The clash of rights demands a delicate balancing of interest approach which is a fundamental postulate of constitutional law. The approach requires that we take conscious and detailed consideration of the interplay of interest observable in a given situation or type of situation. These interests usually consist in the exercise by an individual of his basic freedoms on the one hand, and the government’s promotion of fundamental public interest or policy objectives on the other. Considering that in the case at bar, the extradition proceeding is only at its evaluation stage, the nature of the right being claimed by the private respondent is nebulous and the degree of prejudice he will allegedly suffer is weak, we accord greater weight in the interest espoused by the government thru the petitioner Secretary of Justice.

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Ker v. People of State of Illinois 119 U.S. 436 (December 6, 1886)

While Frederick M. Ker was in Lima, Peru, he was kidnapped and brought to United Stated against his will to face the charges for larceny instituted in the criminal court of Cook county. The indictment also include charges of embezzlement. Ker indictment was started when Gov. Hamilton, of Illinois made a request to extradite Ker, the President granted the request and directed Henry G. Julian, as messenger, to receive the defendant from the authorities of Peru, upon a charge of larceny, in compliance with the treaty between the United States and Peru on that subject; that the said Julian, having the necessary papers with him, arrived in Lima, but, without presenting them to any officer of the Peruvian government, or making any demand on that government for the surrender of Ker, forcibly and with violence arrested him, placed him on board the United States vessel Essex, in the harbor of Callao. He was kept prisoner until they arrived in Honolulu where he was transferred again to a different vessel which brought him to San Francisco, California. Gov. Hamilton again made a request that Ker be surrender to him as a fugitive of justice, who had escaped to that state on account of the same offenses charged in the requisition on Peru and in the indictment in this case. This request was granted and Ker was transferred to Cook County where he was held to answer the indictment already mentioned Ker allege that he was denied due process when he was indicted from Peru to the United Stated. He also allege that by virtue of the treaty of extradition with Peru, he acquired by his residence in that country a right of asylum- a right to be free from molestation for the crime committed in Illinois. The issues are: a.) Whether or not Ker was denied due process of law when he was indicted? b.) Whether or not the indictment was in violation of federal treaty between the United States and Republic of Peru? Due Process The 'due process of law' here guarantied is complied with when the party is regularly indicted by the proper grand jury in the state court, has a trial according to the forms and modes prescribed for such trials, and when, in that trial and proceedings, he is deprived of no rights to which he is lawfully entitled. We do not intend to say that there may not be proceedings previous to the trial, in regard to which the prisoner could invoke

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in some manner the provisions of this clause of the constitution; but, for mere irregularities in the manner in which he may be brought into custody of the law, we do not think he is entitled to say that he should not be tried at all for the crime with which he is charged in a regular indictment. He may be arrested for a very heinous offense by persons without any warrant, or without any previous complaint, and brought before a proper officer; and this may be, in some sense, said to be 'without due process of law.' But it would hardly be claimed that, after the case had been investigated and the defendant held by the proper authorities to answer for the crime, he could plead that he was first arrested 'without due process of law.' So here, when found within the jurisdiction of the state of Illinois, and liable to answer for a crime against the laws of that state, unless there was some positive provision of the constitution or of the laws of this country violated in bringing him into court, it is not easy to see how he can say that he is there 'without due process of law,' within the meaning of the constitutional provision Treaty There is no language in this treaty, or in any other treaty made by this country on the subject of extradition, of which we are aware, which says in terms that a party fleeing from the United States to escape punishment for crime becomes thereby entitled to an asylum in the country to which he has fled. It cannot be doubted that the government of Peru could, of its own accord, without any demand from the United States, have surrendered Ker to an agent of the state of Illinois, and that such surrender would have been valid within the dominions of Peru. It is idle, therefore, to claim that, either by express terms or by implication, there is given to a fugitive from justice in one of these countries any right to remain and reside in the other; and, if the right of asylum means anything, it must mean this. The right of the government of Peru voluntarily to give a party in Ker's condition an asylum in that country is quite a different thing from the right in him to demand and insist upon security in such an asylum. The treaty, so far as it regulates the right of asylum at all, is intended to limit this right in the case of one who is proved to be a criminal fleeing from justice; so that, on proper demand and proceedings had therein, the government of the country of the asylum shall deliver him up to the country where the crime was committed. And to this extent, and to this alone, the treaty does regulate or impose a restriction upon the right of the government of the country of the asylum to protect the criminal from removal there from.

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Chapter 9: Immunity from Jurisdiction

THE HOLY SEE, petitioner, vs. THE HON. ERIBERTO U. ROSARIO, JR., as Presiding Judge of the Regional Trial Court of Makati, Branch 61 and STARBRIGHT SALES ENTERPRISES, INC., respondents. G.R. No. 101949 December 1, 1994 This is a petition for certiorari under Rule 65 of the Revised Rules of Court to reverse and set aside the Orders dated June 20, 1991 and September 19, 1991 of the Regional Trial Court, Branch 61, Makati, Metro Manila in Civil Case No. 90-183. Petitioner is the Holy See who exercises sovereignty over the Vatican City in Rome, Italy, represented in the Philippines by the Papal Nuncio. Private respondent, Starbright Sales Enterprises, Inc., is a domestic corporation engaged in the real estate business. The subject of the petition is a parcel of land consisting of 6,000 square meters (Lot 5-A, Transfer Certificate of Title No. 390440) located in the Municipality of Parañaque, Metro Manila and registered in the name of petitioner. Said Lot 5-A is contiguous to Lots 5-B and 5-D which are covered by Transfer Certificates of Title Nos. 271108 and 265388 respectively and registered in the name of the Philippine Realty Corporation (PRC). The three lots were sold to Ramon Licup, through Msgr. Domingo A. Cirilos, Jr., acting as agent to the sellers. Later, Licup assigned his rights to the sale to private respondent. The lots were surrounded and occupied by squatters. An issue arose as to who should evict the said squatters. The relations severed when the Lot 5-A was thereafter sold by petitioner to Tropicana Properties and Development Corporation (Tropicana). On January 23, 1990, private respondent filed a complaint with the Regional Trial Court, Branch 61, Makati, for annulment of sale of the three parcels of land, and for specific performance and damages against petitioner, represented by the Papal Nuncio, and three other defendants: namely, Msgr. Domingo A. Cirilos, Jr., the PRC and Tropicana (Civil Case No.90-183). The complaint alleged that: (1) on April 17, 1988, Msgr. Cirilos, Jr., on behalf of petitioner and the PRC, agreed to sell to Ramon Licup Lots 5-A, 5-B and 5-D at the price of P1,240.00 per square meters; (2) the agreement to sell was made on the condition that earnest money of P100,000.00 be paid by Licup to the sellers, and that the sellers will clear the said lots of squatters who were then occupying the same; (3) Licup paid the

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earnest money to Msgr. Cirilos; (4) in the same month, Licup assigned his rights over the property to private respondent and informed the sellers of the said assignment; (5) thereafter, private respondent demanded from Msgr. Cirilos that the sellers fulfill their undertaking and clear the property of squatters; however, Msgr. Cirilos informed private respondent of the squatters' refusal to vacate the lots, proposing instead either that private respondent undertake the eviction or that the earnest money be returned to the latter; (6) private respondent counterproposed that if it would undertake the eviction of the squatters, the purchase price of the lots should be reduced from P1,240.00 to P1,150.00 per square meter; (7) Msgr. Cirilos returned the earnest money of P100,000.00 and wrote private respondent giving it seven days from receipt of the letter to pay the original purchase price in cash; (8) private respondent sent the earnest money back to the sellers, but later discovered that on March 30, 1989, petitioner and the PRC, without notice to private respondent, sold the lots to Tropicana, as evidenced by two separate Deeds of Sale, one over Lot 5-A, and another over Lots 5-B and 5-D; and that the sellers' transfer certificate of title over the lots were cancelled, transferred and registered in the name of Tropicana; (9) Tropicana induced petitioner and the PRC to sell the lots to it and thus enriched itself at the expense of private respondent; (10) private respondent demanded the rescission of the sale to Tropicana and the reconveyance of the lots, to no avail; and (11) private respondent is willing and able to comply with the terms of the contract to sell and has actually made plans to develop the lots into a townhouse project, but in view of the sellers' breach, it lost profits of not less than P30,000.000.00. Private respondent thus prayed for: (1) the annulment of the Deeds of Sale between petitioner and the PRC on the one hand, and Tropicana on the other; (2) the reconveyance of the lots in question; (3) specific performance of the agreement to sell between it and the owners of the lots; and (4) damages. The issue is whether or not petitioners are entitled to the privilege of sovereign immunity The Department of Foreign Affairs, through the Office of Legal Affairs moved with this Court to be allowed to intervene on the side of petitioner. The Court allowed the said Department to file its memorandum in support of petitioner's claim of sovereign immunity. The petition is burdened with the contention that respondent trial court has no jurisdiction over petitioner, being a foreign state enjoying sovereign immunity. On the other hand, private respondent insists that the doctrine of non-suability is not anymore absolute and that petitioner has divested itself of such a cloak when, of its own free will, it entered into a commercial transaction for the sale of a parcel of land located in the Philippines. Before we determine the issue of petitioner's non-suability, a brief look into its status as a sovereign state is in order. The Vatican City fits into none of the established categories of states, and the attribution to it of "sovereignty" must be made in a sense different from that in which it is applied to other states (Fenwick, International Law 124-

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125 [1948]; Cruz, International Law 37 [1991]). In a community of national states, the Vatican City represents an entity organized not for political but for ecclesiastical purposes and international objects. Despite its size and object, the Vatican City has an independent government of its own, with the Pope, who is also head of the Roman Catholic Church, as the Holy See or Head of State, in conformity with its traditions, and the demands of its mission in the world. Indeed, the world-wide interests and activities of the Vatican City are such as to make it in a sense an "international state" (Fenwick, supra., 125; Kelsen, Principles of International Law 160 [1956]).The Republic of the Philippines has accorded the Holy See the status of a foreign sovereign. The Holy See, through its Ambassador, the Papal Nuncio, has had diplomatic representations with the Philippine government since 1957 (Rollo, p. 87). This appears to be the universal practice in international relations. There are two conflicting concepts of sovereign immunity, each widely held and firmly established. According to the classical or absolute theory, a sovereign cannot, without its consent, be made a respondent in the courts of another sovereign. Another school of thought holds the newer or restrictive theory, that the immunity of the sovereign is recognized only with regard to public acts or acts jure imperii of a state, but not with regard to private acts or acts jure gestionis The restrictive theory, which is intended to be a solution to the host of problems involving the issue of sovereign immunity, has created problems of its own. Legal treatises and the decisions in countries which follow the restrictive theory have difficulty in characterizing whether a contract of a sovereign state with a private party is an act jure gestionis or an act jure imperii. The restrictive theory came about because of the entry of sovereign states into purely commercial activities remotely connected with the discharge of governmental functions. This is particularly true with respect to the Communist states which took control of nationalized business activities and international trading. This Court has considered the following transactions by a foreign state with private parties as acts jure imperii: (1) the lease by a foreign government of apartment buildings for use of its military officers (Syquia v. Lopez, 84 Phil. 312 [1949]; (2) the conduct of public bidding for the repair of a wharf at a United States Naval Station (United States of America v. Ruiz, supra.); and (3) the change of employment status of base employees (Sanders v. Veridiano, 162 SCRA 88 [1988]). On the other hand, this Court has considered the following transactions by a foreign state with private parties as acts jure gestionis: (1) the hiring of a cook in the recreation center, consisting of three restaurants, a cafeteria, a bakery, a store, and a coffee and pastry shop at the John Hay Air Station in Baguio City, to cater to American servicemen and the general public (United States of America v. Rodrigo, 182 SCRA 644 [1990]); and (2) the bidding for the operation of barber shops in Clark Air Base in Angeles City (United States of America v. Guinto, 182 SCRA 644 [1990]). The operation of the restaurants and other facilities open to the general public is undoubtedly for profit as a commercial and not a governmental activity. By entering into the employment

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contract with the cook in the discharge of its proprietary function, the United States government impliedly divested itself of its sovereign immunity from suit. In the absence of legislation defining what activities and transactions shall be considered "commercial" and as constituting acts jure gestionis, we have to come out with our own guidelines, tentative they may be. The mere entering into a contract by a foreign state with a private party cannot be the ultimate test. Such an act can only be the start of the inquiry. The logical question is whether the foreign state is engaged in the activity in the regular course of business. If the foreign state is not engaged regularly in a business or trade, the particular act or transaction must then be tested by its nature. If the act is in pursuit of a sovereign activity, or an incident thereof, then it is an act jure imperii, especially when it is not undertaken for gain or profit. As held in United States of America v. Guinto, (supra): There is no question that the United States of America, like any other state, will be deemed to have impliedly waived its non-suability if it has entered into a contract in its proprietary or private capacity. It is only when the contract involves its sovereign or governmental capacity that no such waiver may be implied. In this case, if petitioner has bought and sold lands in the ordinary course of a real estate business, surely the said transaction can be categorized as an act jure gestionis. However, petitioner has denied that the acquisition and subsequent disposal of Lot 5-A were made for profit but claimed that it acquired said property for the site of its mission or the Apostolic Nunciature in the Philippines. Private respondent failed to dispute said claim. The issue of petitioner's non-suability can be determined by the trial court without going to trial in the light of the pleadings, particularly the admission of private respondent. Besides, the privilege of sovereign immunity in this case was sufficiently established by the Memorandum and Certification of the Department of Foreign Affairs. As the department tasked with the conduct of the Philippines' foreign relations (Administrative Code of 1987, Book IV, Title I, Sec. 3), the Department of Foreign Affairs has formally intervened in this case and officially certified that the Embassy of the Holy See is a duly accredited diplomatic mission to the Republic of the Philippines exempt from local jurisdiction and entitled to all the rights, privileges and immunities of a diplomatic mission or embassy in this country (Rollo, pp. 156-157). The determination of the executive arm of government that a state or instrumentality is entitled to sovereign or diplomatic immunity is a political question that is conclusive upon the courts (International Catholic Migration Commission v. Calleja, 190 SCRA 130 [1990]). Where the plea of immunity is recognized and affirmed by the executive branch, it is the duty of the courts to accept this claim so as not to embarrass the executive arm of the government in conducting the country's foreign relations (World Health Organization v. Aquino, 48

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SCRA 242 [1972]). As in International Catholic Migration Commission and in World Health Organization, we abide by the certification of the Department of Foreign Affairs. Private respondent is not left without any legal remedy for the redress of its grievances. Under both Public International Law and Transnational Law, a person who feels aggrieved by the acts of a foreign sovereign can ask his own government to espouse his cause through diplomatic channels. Private respondent can ask the Philippine government, through the Foreign Office, to espouse its claims against the Holy See. Its first task is to persuade the Philippine government to take up with the Holy See the validity of its claims. Of course, the Foreign Office shall first make a determination of the impact of its espousal on the relations between the Philippine government and the Holy See (Young, Remedies of Private Claimants Against Foreign States, Selected Readings on Protection by Law of Private Foreign Investments 905, 919 [1964]). Once the Philippine government decides to espouse the claim, the latter ceases to be a private cause. According to the Permanent Court of International Justice, the forerunner of the International Court of Justice: By taking up the case of one of its subjects and by reporting to diplomatic action or international judicial proceedings on his behalf, a State is in reality asserting its own rights — its right to ensure, in the person of its subjects, respect for the rules of international law (The Mavrommatis Palestine Concessions, 1 Hudson, World Court Reports 293, 302 [1924]). WHEREFORE, the petition for certiorari is GRANTED and the complaint in Civil Case No. 90-183 against petitioner is DISMISSED.

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THE PINOCHET CASE 25 November 1998 House of Lords On 11 September 1973 General Augusto Pinochet Ugarte assumed power in Chile after a military coup. He was appointed president of the Governing Junta the same day. On 22 September the new regime was recognised by Her Majesty's Government. By a decree dated 11 December 1974 General Pinochet assumed the title of President of the Republic. In 1980 a new constitution came into force in Chile, approved by a national referendum. It provided for executive power in Chile to be exercised by the President of the Republic as head of state. Democratic elections were held in December 1989. As a result, General Pinochet handed over power to President Aylwin on 11 March 1990. On 19 April 1978, while General Pinochet was still head of state, the senate passed a decree granting an amnesty to all persons involved in criminal acts (with certain exceptions) between 11 September 1973 and 10 March 1978. The purpose of the amnesty was stated to be for the "general tranquillity, peace and order" of the nation. After General Pinochet fell from power, the new democratic government appointed a Commission for Truth and Reconciliation, thus foreshadowing the appointment of a similar commission in South Africa. The Commission consisted of eight civilians of varying political viewpoints under the chairmanship of Don Raul Rettig. Their terms of reference were to investigate all violations of human rights between 1973 and 1990, and to make recommendations. The Commission reported on 9 February 1991. In 1994 Senator Pinochet came to the United Kingdom on a special diplomatic mission: (he had previously been appointed senator for life). He came again in 1995 and 1997. According to the evidence of Professor Walters, a former foreign minister and ambassador to the United Kingdom, Senator Pinochet was accorded normal diplomatic courtesies. The Foreign Office was informed in advance of his visit to London in September 1998, where at the age of 82 he has undergone an operation at the London Clinic. At 11.25 p.m. on 16 October he was arrested while still at the London Clinic pursuant to a provisional warrant issued under section 8(1)(b) of the Extradition Act 1989. On 17 October the Chilean Government protested. The protest was renewed on 23 October. The purpose of the protest was to claim immunity from suit on behalf of Senator Pinochet both as a visiting diplomat and as a former head of state, and to request his immediate release. all events, Judge Garzon in Madrid issued a second international warrant of arrest dated 18 October, alleging crimes of genocide and terrorism. This in turn led to a second provisional warrant of arrest in England issued on this occasion by Mr. Ronald Bartle. Senator Pinochet was re-arrested in pursuance of the second warrant on 23 October.

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In the Divisional Court the Lord Chief Justice summarized the position saying that the thrust of the warrant "makes it plain that the applicant is charged not with personally torturing or murdering victims or ordering their disappearance, but with using the power of the State to that end". Relying on the information contained in the request for extradition, it is necessary to expand the cryptic account of the facts in the warrant. The request alleges a systematic campaign of repression against various groups in Chile after the military coup on 11 September 1973. The case is that of the order of 4,000 individuals were killed or simply disappeared. Such killings and disappearances mostly took place in Chile but some also took place in various countries abroad. Such acts were committed during the period from 11 September 1973 until 1990. The climax of the repression was reached in 1974 and 1975. The principal instrumentality of the oppression was the Direction de Inteligencia Nacional (DINA), the secret police. The subsequent renaming of this organization is immaterial. The case is that agents of DINA, who were specially trained in torture techniques, tortured victims on a vast scale in secret torture chambers in Santiago and elsewhere in Chile. The torturers were invariably dressed in civilian clothes. Hooded doctors were present during torture sessions. The case is not one of interrogators acting in excess of zeal. The case goes much further. The request explains: "The most usual method was "the grill" consisting of a metal table on which the victim was laid naked and his extremities tied and electrical shocks were applied to the lips, genitals, wounds or metal prosthesis; also two persons, relatives or friends, were placed in two metal drawers one on top of the other so that when the one above was tortured the psychological impact was felt by the other; on other occasions the victim was suspended from a bar by the wrists and/or the knees, and over a prolonged period while held in this situation electric current was applied to him, cutting wounds were inflicted or he was beaten; or the "dry submarine" method was applied, i.e. placing a bag on the head until close to suffocation, also drugs were used and boiling water was thrown on various detainees to punish them as a foretaste for the death which they would later suffer." As the Divisional Court observed it is not alleged that General Pinochet personally committed any of these acts by his own hand. The case is, however, that agents of DINA committed the acts of torture and that DINA was directly answerable to General Pinochet rather than to the military junta. And the case is that DINA undertook and arranged the killings, disappearances and torturing of victims on the orders of General Pinochet. The issue is whether Senator Pinochet may be entitled to immunity as a Former Head of State? The appellants stated in para. 26 of their written case: "No international agreement specifically provides for the immunities of a former head of state. However, under customary international law, it is accepted that a state is entitled to expect that its former head of state will not be subjected to the jurisdiction of the courts of another state

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for certain categories of acts performed while he was head of state unless immunity is waived by the current government of the state of which he was once the head. The immunity is accorded for the benefit not of the former head of state himself but for the state of which he was once the head and any international law obligations are owed to that state and not to the individual." The important point to notice in this formulation of the immunity principle is that the rationale is the same for former heads of state as it is for current heads of state. In each case the obligation in international law is owed to the state, and not the individual, though in the case of a current head of state he will have a concurrent immunity ratione personae. This rationale explains why it is the state, and the state alone, which can waive the immunity. Where, therefore, a state is seeking the extradition of its own former head of state, as has happened in a number of cases, the immunity is waived ex hypothesi. It cannot be asserted by the former head of state. But here the situation is the reverse. Chile is not waiving its immunity in respect of the acts of Senator Pinochet as former head of state. It is asserting that immunity in the strongest possible terms, both in respect of the Spanish international warrant, and also in respect of the extradition proceedings in the United Kingdom. Decided cases support the same approach. In Hatch v. Baez (1876) 7 Hun. 596 the plaintiff complained of an injury which he sustained at the hands of the defendant when president of the Dominican Republic. After the defendant had ceased to be president, he was arrested in New York at the suit of the plaintiff. There was a full argument before what would now, I think, be called the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, with extensive citation of authority including Duke of Brunswick v. King of Hanover. The court ruled: "The wrongs and injuries of which the plaintiff complains were inflicted upon him by the Government of St. Domingo, while he was residing in that country, and was in all respects subject to its laws. They consist of acts done by the defendant in his official capacity of president of that republic." "The fact that the defendant has ceased to be president of St. Domingo does not destroy his immunity. That springs from the capacity in which the acts were done, and protects the individual who did them, because they emanated from a foreign and friendly government." In Underhill v. Hernandez (1897) 168 U.S. 250 the plaintiff was an American citizen resident in Venezuela. The defendant was a general in command of revolutionary forces, which afterwards prevailed. The plaintiffs brought proceedings against the defendant in New York, alleging wrongful imprisonment during the revolution. In a celebrated passage Chief Justice Fuller said, at 252: "Every sovereign state is bound to respect the independence of every other sovereign state, and the courts of one country will not sit in

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judgment on the acts of the government of another done within its own territory. Redress of grievances by reason of such acts must be obtained through the means open to be availed of by sovereign powers as between themselves." In order for the act of state doctrine to apply, the defendant must establish that his activities are 'acts of state', i.e. that they were taken on behalf of the state and not, as private acts, on behalf of the actor himself. That the acts must be public acts of the sovereign has been repeatedly affirmed. Though the distinction between the public and private acts of government officials may prove elusive, this difficulty has not prevented courts from scrutinizing the character of the conduct in question. In committing the crimes which are alleged against him, was Senator Pinochet acting in his private capacity or was he acting in a sovereign capacity as head of state? He was acting in a sovereign capacity. It has not been suggested that he was personally guilty of any of the crimes of torture or hostage-taking in the sense that he carried them out with his own hands. What is alleged against him is that he organized the commission of such crimes, including the elimination of his political opponents, as head of the Chilean government, and that he did so in co-operation with other governments under Plan Condor, and in particular with the government of Argentina. These circumstances he cannot be treated as having acted in a private capacity. The appellants have two further arguments. First they say that the crimes alleged against Senator Pinochet are so horrific that an exception must be made to the ordinary rule of customary international law. Secondly they say that the crimes in question are crimes against international law, and that international law cannot both condemn conduct as a breach of international law and at the same time grant immunity from prosecution. It cannot give with one hand and take away with the other. In the first submission, the difficulty is to know where to draw the line. Torture is a horrific crime, but so is murder. It is a regrettable fact that almost all leaders of revolutionary movements are guilty of killing their political opponents in the course of coming to power, and many are guilty of murdering their political opponents thereafter in order to secure their power. Yet it is not suggested that the crime of murder puts the successful revolutionary beyond the pale of immunity in customary international law. It is strange to think of murder or torture as "official" acts or as part of the head of state's "public functions." But if for "official" one substitutes "governmental" then the true nature of the distinction between private acts and official acts becomes apparent. For reasons already mentioned there is no doubt that the crimes of which Senator Pinochet is accused, including the crime of torture, were governmental in nature. Otherwise one would get to this position: that the crimes of a head of state in the execution of his governmental authority are to be attributed to the state so long as they are not too serious. But beyond a certain (undefined) degree of seriousness the crimes cease to be attributable to the state, and are instead to be treated as his private crimes. That would not make sense.

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The second submission, the question is whether there should be an exception from the general rule of immunity in the case of crimes which have been made the subject of international conventions, such as the International Convention against the Taking of Hostages (1980) and the Convention against Torture (1984). The purpose of these conventions, in very broad terms, was to ensure that acts of torture and hostage-taking should be made (or remain) offences under the criminal law of each of the state parties, and that each state party should take measures to establish extra-territorial jurisdiction in specified cases. Thus in the case of torture a state party is obliged to establish extraterritorial jurisdiction when the alleged offender is a national of that state, but not where the victim is a national. In the latter case the state has a discretion: see article 5.1(b) and (c). In addition there is an obligation on a state to extradite or prosecute where a person accused of torture is found within its territory--aut dedere aut judicare: see article 7. But there is nothing in the Torture Convention which touches on state immunity. The contrast with the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (1948) could not be more marked. Article 4 of the Genocide Convention provides: "Persons committing genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article 3 shall be punished whether they are constitutionally responsible rulers or public officials or private individuals." There is no equivalent provision in either the Torture Convention or the Taking of Hostages Convention. Moreover, when the Genocide Convention was incorporated into English law by the Genocide Act 1969, article 4 was omitted. So Parliament must clearly have intended, or at least contemplated, that a head of state accused of genocide would be able to plead sovereign immunity. If the Torture Convention and the Taking of Hostages Convention had contained a provision equivalent to article 4 of the Genocide Convention (which they did not) it is reasonable to suppose that, as with genocide, the equivalent provisions would have been omitted when Parliament incorporated those conventions into English law. It cannot be seen any inconsistency between the purposes underlying these Conventions and the rule of international law which allows a head of state procedural immunity in respect of crimes covered by the Conventions. Senator Pinochet was held entitled to immunity as former head of state at common law. The appeal was permitted.

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KHOSROW MINUCHER, petitioner, vs. HON. COURT OF APPEALS and ARTHUR SCALZO, respondents. An Information for violation of the Dangerous Drugs Act of 1972, was filed against petitioner Khosrow Minucher and one Abbas Torabian with the Regional Trial Court, Pasig City. The criminal charge followed a “buy-bust operation” by the Philippine police narcotic agents in the house of Minucher, an Iranian national, where a quantity of heroin, a prohibited drug, was said to have been seized. The narcotic agents were accompanied by private respondent Arthur Scalzo became one of the principal witnesses for the prosecution. Minucher disclosed that he is an Iranian national. He came to the Philippines to study in the University of the Philippines in 1974. In 1976, under the regime of the Shah of Iran, he was appointed Labor Attaché for the Iranian Embassies in Tokyo, Japan and Manila, Philippines. When the Shah of Iran was deposed, plaintiff became a refugee of the United Nations and continued to stay in the Philippines. He came to know the defendant on May 13, 1986, when the latter was introduced to him by Jose Iñigo, an informer of the Intelligence Unit of the military. During their introduction in that meeting, the defendant gave the plaintiff his calling card, which showed that he is working at the US Embassy in the Philippines. It was also during this first meeting that plaintiff expressed his desire to obtain a US Visa for his wife and the wife of a countryman named Abbas Torabian. The defendant told him that he [could] help plaintiff for a fee of $2,000.00 per visa. At about 3:00 in the afternoon of May 27, 1986, the defendant came back again to plaintiff's house, where the latter and his countryman, Abbas Torabian, were playing chess. Plaintiff opened his safe in the bedroom and got $2,000.00 from it, gave it to the defendant for the latter's fee in obtaining a visa for plaintiff's wife. The defendant requested him to come out of the house for a while so that he can introduce him to his cousin waiting in a cab. To his surprise, an American jumped out of the cab with a drawn high-powered gun. He was in the company of about 30 to 40 Filipino soldiers with 6 Americans, all armed. He was handcuffed was brought inside the house by the defendant. Plaintiff was not told why he was being handcuffed and why the privacy of his house, especially his bedroom was invaded by defendant. He asked for any warrant, but the defendant told him to `shut up.’ That his arrest as a heroin trafficker had been well publicized throughout the world, in various newspapers. He was identified in the papers as an international drug trafficker. On 14 June 1990, after almost two years since the institution of the civil case, Scalzo invoked that being a special agent of the United States Drug Enforcement Administration, he was entitled to diplomatic immunity. While the trial court gave credence to the claim of Scalzo and the evidence presented by him that he was a diplomatic agent entitled to immunity as such, it ruled that he, nevertheless, should be held accountable for the acts complained of committed outside his official duties. On appeal, the Court of Appeals reversed the decision of the trial court and sustained the

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defense of Scalzo that he was sufficiently clothed with diplomatic immunity during his term of duty and thereby immune from the criminal and civil jurisdiction of the “Receiving State” pursuant to the terms of the Vienna Convention. Hence, this recourse by Minucher. The issue is whether or not Arthur Scalzo is indeed entitled to diplomatic immunity. Scalzo contends that the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, grants him absolute immunity from suit, describing his functions as an agent of the United States Drugs Enforcement Agency as “conducting surveillance operations on suspected drug dealers in the Philippines. The Convention lists the classes of heads of diplomatic missions to include (a) ambassadors or nuncios accredited to the heads of state, (b) envoys, ministers or internuncios accredited to the heads of states; and (c) charges d' affairs accredited to the ministers of foreign affairs. Comprising the "staff of the (diplomatic) mission" are the diplomatic staff, the administrative staff and the technical and service staff. Only the heads of missions, as well as members of the diplomatic staff, excluding the members of the administrative, technical and service staff of the mission, are accorded diplomatic rank. Even while the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations provides for immunity to the members of diplomatic missions, it does so, nevertheless, with an understanding that the same be restrictively applied. Only "diplomatic agents," under the terms of the Convention, are vested with blanket diplomatic immunity from civil and criminal suits. The Convention defines "diplomatic agents" as the heads of missions or members of the diplomatic staff, thus impliedly withholding the same privileges from all others. Indeed, the main yardstick in ascertaining whether a person is a diplomat entitled to immunity is the determination of whether or not he performs duties of diplomatic nature. Scalzo asserted, that he was an Assistant Attaché of the United States diplomatic mission and was accredited as such by the Philippine Government. An attaché belongs to a category of officers in the diplomatic establishment who may be in charge of its cultural, press, administrative or financial affairs. Attaches assist a chief of mission in his duties and are administratively under him, but their main function is to observe, analyze and interpret trends and developments in their respective fields in the host country and submit reports to their own ministries or departments in the home government. These officials are not generally regarded as members of the diplomatic mission, nor are they normally designated as having diplomatic rank. The government of the United States itself, which Scalzo claims to be acting for, has formulated its standards for recognition of a diplomatic agent. The State Department policy is to only concede diplomatic status to a person who possesses an acknowledged

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diplomatic title and “performs duties of diplomatic nature. But while the diplomatic immunity of Scalzo might thus remain contentious, it was sufficiently established that, indeed, he worked for the United States Drug Enforcement Agency and was tasked to conduct surveillance of suspected drug activities within the country on the dates pertinent to this case. If it should be ascertained that Arthur Scalzo was acting well within his assigned functions when he committed the acts alleged in the complaint, the present controversy could then be resolved under the related doctrine of State Immunity from Suit. The precept that a State cannot be sued in the courts of a foreign state is a longstanding rule of customary international law then closely identified with the personal immunity of a foreign sovereign from suit. If the acts giving rise to a suit are those of a foreign government done by its foreign agent, although not necessarily a diplomatic personage, but acting in his official capacity, the complaint could be barred by the immunity of the foreign sovereign from suit without its consent. Suing a representative of a state is believed to be, in effect, suing the state itself. The proscription is not accorded for the benefit of an individual but for the State, in whose service he is under. The official exchanges of communication between agencies of the government of the two countries, certifications from officials of both the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs and the United States Embassy, as well as the participation of members of the Philippine Narcotics Command in the “buy-bust operation” conducted at the residence of Minucher at the behest of Scalzo, may be inadequate to support the "diplomatic status" of the latter but they give enough indication that the Philippine government has given its imprimatur, if not consent, to the activities within Philippine territory of agent Scalzo of the United States Drug Enforcement Agency. The job description of Scalzo has tasked him to conduct surveillance on suspected drug suppliers and, after having ascertained the target, to inform local law enforcers who would then be expected to make the arrest. In conducting surveillance activities on Minucher, later acting as the poseur-buyer during the buy-bust operation, and then becoming a principal witness in the criminal case against Minucher, Scalzo hardly can be said to have acted beyond the scope of his official function or duties.

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THE REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA V. VINZON Petitioner, Republic of Indonesia, represented by its Counselor, Siti Partinah, entered into a Maintenance Agreement in August 1995 with respondent James Vinzon, sole proprietor of Vinzon Trade and Services. The Maintenance Agreement stated that respondent shall, for a consideration, maintain specified equipment at the Embassy Main Building, Embassy Annex Building and the Wisma Duta, the official residence of petitioner Ambassador Soeratmin. The equipment covered by the Maintenance Agreement are: air conditioning units, generator sets, electrical facilities, water heaters, and water motor pumps. It is likewise stated therein that the agreement shall be effective for a period of four years and will renew itself automatically unless cancelled by either party by giving thirty days prior written notice from the date of expiry. Petitioners claim that sometime prior to the date of expiration of the said agreement, or before August 1999, they informed respondent that the renewal of the agreement shall be at the discretion of the incoming Chief of Administration, Minister Counsellor Azhari Kasim, who was expected to arrive in February 2000. When Minister Counsellor Kasim assumed the position of Chief of Administration in March 2000, he allegedly found respondent’s work and services unsatisfactory and not in compliance with the standards set in the Maintenance Agreement. Hence, the Indonesian Embassy terminated the agreement in a letter dated August 31, 2000. Petitioners claim, moreover, that they had earlier verbally informed respondent of their decision to terminate the agreement. On the other hand, respondent claims that the aforesaid termination was arbitrary and unlawful. The trial court’s denial of the Motion to Dismiss was brought up to the Court of Appeals by herein petitioners in a petition for certiorari and prohibition. Said petition, docketed as CA-G.R. SP No. 66894, alleged that the trial court gravely abused its discretion in ruling that the Republic of Indonesia gave its consent to be sued and voluntarily submitted itself to the laws and jurisdiction of Philippine courts and that petitioners Ambassador Soeratmin and Minister Counsellor Kasim waived their immunity from suit. On May 30, 2002, the Court of Appeals rendered its assailed decision denying the petition for lack of merit. On August 16, 2002, it denied herein petitioners’ motion for reconsideration. The CA likewise denied the petition. Hence, this petition. The issue is whether or not the CA erred in sustaining the trial Courts Decision that petitioners have waived their immunity from suit by using as its basis the abovementioned provision in the maintenance agreement. The petition is impressed with merit.

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The existence alone of a paragraph in a contract stating that any legal action arising out of the agreement shall be settled according to the laws of the Philippines and by a specified court is not necessarily a waiver of sovereign immunity from suit. Submission by a foreign state to local jurisdiction must be clear and unequivocal. There is no dispute that the mission is an act jure imperii. Hence the state may enter into contracts with private entities to maintain the furnishings of the embassy. It is clear therefore that the Republic was acting in pursuit of sovereign activity. The agreement relied upon by the respondent was not a waiver of their immunity but a mere stipulation that in the event that they do waive their immunity, Philippine laws shall govern. Neither that the petitioner can be held liable personally. Art.31 of the Vienna Convention provides that a diplomatic agent shall enjoy immunity from the criminal jurisdiction of the receiving state. He shall also enjoy immunity from civil and administrative jurisdiction, except in case of: a real action relating to private immovable property situated in the territory of the receiving state unless he holds it in behalf of the sending state; an action relating to succession in which the diplomatic agent is involved as executor, administrator, heir, or legatee; an action relating to professional or commercial activity exercised by the diplomatic agent outside his official function. Hence, since the act of the petitioner is not covered by the exceptions they cannot be held personally liable. The act of petitioners Ambassador Soeratmin and Minister Counsellor Kasim in terminating the Maintenance Agreement is not covered by the exceptions provided in the abovementioned provision. The Solicitor General believes that said act may fall under subparagraph (c) thereof, but said provision clearly applies only to a situation where the diplomatic agent engages in any professional or commercial activity outside official functions, which is not the case herein. The petition is hereby GRANTED. The decision and resolution of the Court of Appeals in CA G.R. SP No. 66894 are REVERSED and SET ASIDE and the complaint in Civil Case No. 18203 against petitioners is DISMISSED.

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US DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR STAFF IN TEHRAN CASE (United States v. Iran) (Merits) 1980 I.C.J 3 (by M.R. Rey) On 4 November 1979, Iranian students seized the US Embassy in Tehran and a number of consulates in outlying cities. The Iranian authorities failed to protect the Embassy and later appeared to adopt the students’ actions. Over 50 US nationals (mostly diplomatic and consular staff) were held for 444 days. The ICJ had indicated provisional measures against Iran (1979 I.C.J. 7), and in this case the US sought a declaration, inter alia, that Iran had violated the two Vienna Conventions, and ceiling for the release of the hostages and the vacation of the Embassy and consulates. The Court considered whether the initial attack by the students could be attributed to the Iranian government and whether Iran was therefore in violation of its international obligations. 68. The Court is therefore led inevitably to conclude, in regard to the first phase of the events which has so far been considered, that on November 1979 the Iranian authorities: (a) were fully aware of their obligations under the conventions in force to take appropriate steps to protect the premises of the United States Embassy and its diplomatic and consular staff from any attack and from any infringement of their inviolability, and to ensure the security of such other persons as might be present on the said premise; (b) were fully aware, as a result of the appeals for help by the United States embassy, of the urgent need for the action on their part; (c) had the means at their disposal to perform their obligations; (d) completely failed to comply with these obligations. Similarly, the Court is led to conclude that the Iranian authorities were equally aware of their obligations to protect the United States consulates at Tabriz and Shiraz, and of the need for action on their part, and similarly failed to use the means which were at their disposal to comply with their obligations. 69. The second phase of the events which are the subject of the United States’ claims compromises the whole series of facts which occurred following the completion of the occupation of the United States Embassy by the militants, and the seizure of the Consulates at Tabriz and Shiraz. The occupation having taken place and the diplomatic and consular personnel of the United States’ mission having been taken hostages, the action required of the Iranian Government by the Vienna Conventions and by general international law manifest. Its plain duty was at once to make every effort, and to take every appropriate step, to bring this flagrant infringements of the inviolability of the premises, archives and diplomatic consular staff of the United States Embassy to a

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speedy end, to restore the Consulates at Tabriz and Shiraz to the United States control, and in general to re-establish the status quo and to offer reparation for the damage. 76. The Iranian authorities, decision t continue the subjection of the premises of the United States Embassy to occupation by militants and by the Embassy Staff to detention as hostages, clearly gave rise to repeated and multiple breaches of the applicable provisions of the Vienna Conventions even more serious than those which arose from their failure to take any steps to prevent the attacks on the inviolability of these premises and staff. 87. In the present case, the Iranian Government did not break off diplomatic relations with the United States; and in response to a question put to him by a member of the Court, the United States Agent informed the Court that no time before the events of 4 November 1979 had the Iranian Government declared, or indicated any intention to declare any member of the United States diplomatic or consular staff in Tehran persona non grata. The Iranian Government did not, therefore, employ the remedies placed at its disposal by diplomatic law specifically for dealing with activities of the kind of which it now complains. Instead, it allowed a group of militants to attack and occupy the United States Embassy by force, and to seize the diplomatic and consular staff as hostages; instead, it has endorsed that action of those militants and has deliberately maintained their occupation of the Embassy and detention of its staff as a means of coercing the sending States. The Court, therefore, can only conclude that Iran did not have the recourse to the normal and efficacious means at its disposal, but resorted to coercive action against the United States Embassy and its staff. 92. It is a matter of deep regret that the situation which occasioned those observations has not been rectified since they were made. Having regarded to their importance the Court considers it essential to reiterate them in the present judgment. The frequency with which at the present time the principles of international law governing diplomatic and consular relations are set in naught by individuals or groups of individuals is already deplorable. But this case is unique and of very particular gravity because here it is not only private individuals or groups of individuals that have disregarded and set at naught the inviolability of a foreign embassy, but the government of the receiving State itself,. Therefore in recalling yet again the extreme importance of the principles of law which it is called upon to apply in the present case, the Court considers it to be its duty to draw the attention of the entire international community, of which Iran itself has been a member since time immemorial, to the irreparable harm that may be caused by events of the kind now before the Court. Such events cannot fail to undermine the edifice of law carefully constructed by mankind over a period of centuries, the maintenance of which is vital for the security and well-being of the complex international community of the present day, to which it is more essential than ever that the rules developed to ensure the ordered progress of relations between its members should be constantly and scrupulously respected.

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JEFFREY LIANG (HEUFENG) v. PEOPLE OF THE PHILIPPINES G.R. No. 125865 March 26,2001

Petitioner Liang is a Chinese national employed as an Economist by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). Two criminal Informations for grave oral defamation were filed against petitioner for allegedly uttering defamatory words to Joyce Cabal, a member of the clerical staff of ADB. The Metropolitan Trial Court of Mandaluyong, however, dismissed the complaints pursuant to an advice from DFA that petitioner enjoyed immunity from legal processes. On a petition for review on certiorari and mandamus filed by the respondent, the Regional Trial Court of Pasig, however, reversed and annulled the decision of the MTC. Hence, this petition. The issue is whether the acts complained of are covered by the immunity granted to officers and staff of ADB. The immunity granted to officers and staff of ADB is not absolute; it is limited to acts performed in an official capacity. The immunity cannot cover the commission of a crime such as slander or oral defamation on the name of official duty. The slander of a person, by any stretch, cannot be considered as falling within the purview of the immunity granted to ADB officers and staff, the same being not performed in an official capacity. However, the issue whether petitioner’s utterances constituted oral defamation is for the trial court to determine.

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CASE CONCERNING THE TEMPLE OF PREAH VIHEAR (Merits) Judgment of 15 June 1962 The subject of the dispute between Government of Cambodia and the Government of Thailand was sovereignty of the region of the Temple of Preah Vihear. This ancient sanctuary, partially in ruins, stood on a promontory of the Dangrek range of mountains which constituted the boundary between Cambodia and Thailand. The dispute had its fons et origo in the boundary settlements made in the period 1904-1908 between France, then conducting the foreign relations of Indo-China, and Siam. The application of the Treaty of 13 February 1904 was, in particular, involved. That Treaty established the general character of the frontier the exact boundary of which was to be delimited by a Franco-Siamese Mixed Commission. In the eastern sector of the Dangrek range, in which Preah Vihear was situated, the frontier was to follow the watershed line. For the purpose of delimiting that frontier, it was agreed, at a meeting held on 2 December 1906, that the Mixed Commission should travel along the Dangrek range carrying out all the necessary reconnaissance, and that a survey officer of the French section of the Commission should survey the whole of the eastern part of the range. It had not been contested that the Presidents of the French and Siamese sections duly made this journey, in the course of which they visited the Temple of Preah Vihear. In January-February 1907, the President of the French section had reported to his Government that the frontier-line had been definitely established. It therefore seemed clear that a frontier had been surveyed and fixed, although there was no record of any decision and no reference to the Dangrek region in any minutes of the meetings of the Commission after 2 December 1906. Moreover, at the time when the Commission might have met for the purpose of winding up its work, attention was directed towards the conclusion of a further Franco-Siamese boundary treaty, the Treaty of 23 March 1907. The final stage of the delimitation was the preparation of maps. The Siamese Government, which did not dispose of adequate technical means, had requested that French officers should map the frontier region. These maps were completed in the autumn of 1907 by a team of French officers, some of whom had been members of the Mixed Commission, and they were communicated to the Siamese Government in 1908. Amongst them was a map of the Dangrek range showing Preah Vihear on the Cambodian side. It was on that map (filed as Annex I to its Memorial) that Cambodia had principally relied in support of her claim to sovereignty over the Temple. Thailand, on the other hand, had contended that the map, not being the work of the Mixed Commission, had no binding character; that the frontier indicated on it was not the true watershed line and that the true watershed line would place the Temple in Thailand, that the map had never been accepted by Thailand or, alternatively, that if Thailand had accepted it she had done so only because of a mistaken belief that the frontier indicated corresponded with the watershed line.

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The Annex I map was never formally approved by the Mixed Commission, which had ceased to function some months before its production. While there could be no reasonable doubt that it was based on the work of the surveying officers in the Dangrek sector, the Court nevertheless concluded that, in its inception, it had no binding character. It was clear from the record, however, that the maps were communicated to the Siamese Government as purporting to represent the outcome of the work of delimitation; since there was no reaction on the part of the Siamese authorities, either then or for many years, they must be held to have acquiesced. The maps were moreover communicated to the Siamese members of the Mixed Commission, who said nothing. to the Siamese Minister of the Interior, Prince Damrong, who thanked the French Minister in Bangkok for them, and to the Siamese provincial governors, some of whom knew of Preah Vihear. If the Siamese authorities accepted the Annex I map without investigation, they could not now plead any error vitiating the reality of their consent. The Siamese Government and later the Thai Government had raised no query about the Annex I map prior to its negotiations with Cambodia in Bangkok in 1958. But in 1934-1935 a survey had established a divergence between the map line and the true line of the watershed, and other maps had been produced showing the Temple as being in Thailand: Thailand had nevertheless continued also to use and indeed to publish maps showing Preah Vihear as lying in Cambodia. Moreover, in the course of the negotiations for the 1925 and 1937 Franco-Siamese Treaties, which confirmed the existing frontiers, and in 1947 in Washington before the Franco-Siamese Conciliation Commission, it would have been natural for Thailand to raise the matter: she did not do so. The natural inference was that she had accepted the frontier at Preah Vihear as it was drawn on the map, irrespective of its correspondence with the watershed line. Thailand had stated that having been, at all material times, in possession of Preah Vihear, she had had no need to raise the matter; she had indeed instanced the acts of her administrative authorities on the ground as evidence that she had never accepted the Annex I line at Preah Vihear. But the Court found it difficult to regard such local acts as negativing the consistent attitude of the central authorities. Moreover, when in 1930 Prince Damrong, on a visit to the Temple, was officially received there by the French Resident for the adjoining Cambodian province, Siam failed to react. The issue is whether or not Thailand had accepted the Annex I map by its failure to object to the map and its continued use of the map thereby granting sovereignty to Cambodia over Preah Vihear. From the facts, the court concluded that Thailand had accepted the Annex I map. Even if there were any doubt in this connection, Thailand was not precluded from asserting that she had not accepted it since France and Cambodia had relied upon her acceptance and she had for fifty years enjoyed such benefits as the Treaty of 1904 has conferred on her. Furthermore, the acceptance of the Annex I map caused it to enter the treaty settlement; the Parties had at that time adopted an interpretation of that settlement which caused the map line to prevail over the provisions of the Treaty and, as there was no reason to think that the Parties had attached any special importance to the line of the watershed as such, as compared with the overriding importance of a final regulation of

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their own frontiers, the Court considered that the interpretation to be given now would be the same. The Court therefore felt bound to pronounce in favor of the frontier indicated on the Annex I map in the disputed area and it became unnecessary to consider whether the line as mapped did in fact correspond to the true watershed line. For these reasons, the Court upheld the submissions of Cambodia concerning sovereignty over Preah Vihear.

FISHERIES CASE (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland vs. Norway) In past centuries, British fishermen had made incursions in the waters near the Norwegian coast. As a result of complains from the King of Norway, the British abstained from doing so at the beginning of the 17th century and for 300 years. But in 1906, British vessels appeared again. These were trawlers equipped with improved and powerful gears. The local population became perturbed and measures were taken by Norway with a view to specifying the limits within which fishing was prohibited to foreigners. Incidents occurred, became more frequent, and on July 12, 1935, the Norwegian Government delimited the Norwegian fisheries zone by Decree. Negotiations had been entered into by the two Governments; they were pursued after the Decree was enacted, but without success. A considerable number of British trawlers were arrested and condemned in 1948 and 1949. It was then that the United Kingdom Government instituted proceedings before the Court. The coastal zone concerned in the dispute is of a distinctive configuration. Its length exceeds 1,500 kilometers. Mountainous along its whole length broken by fjords and bays, dotted with countless islands, islets and reefs. The coast does not constitute a clear dividing line between land and sea. The land configuration stretches out into the sea and what really constitutes the Norwegian coastline is the outer line of the formations viewed as a whole. Along the coastal zone are situated shallow banks which are very rich in fish. These have been exploited from time immemorial by the inhabitants of the mainland and of the islands; they derive their livelihood essentially from such fishing. The United Kingdom Government asked the Court to state whether the lines laid down by the 1935 Decree for the purpose of delimitating the Norwegian fisheries zone have or have not been drawn in accordance with international low-water mark. Rule has not acquired the authority of a general rule of international ional law. The principle put forward by the United Kingdom is that the base-line must be the low-water mark. This is the criterion generally adopted in the practices of States. The parties agree to this criterion but the conclusion that the relevant line is not that of the

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mainland, but rather that of the “skjaergaard”, also lead to the rejection of the requirement that the base-line should always follow law, neither in respect of bays nor the waters separating the islands of an archipelago. Furthermore, ten-mile rule is inapplicable as against Norway inasmuch as she has always historically opposed its application to the Norwegian coast. Norway argued that the 1935 Decree is an application of a traditional system of delimitation in accordance with international law. In its view, international law takes into account the diversity of acts and concedes that the delimitation must be adapted to the special conditions obtaining in different regions. A Norwegian Decree in 1812, as well as a number of subsequent texts shows that the method of straight lines, imposed by geography, has been established in the Norwegian system and consolidated by a constant and sufficient long practice. The application of this system encountered no opposition from other States. Even the United Kingdom did not contest it for many years; it was only in 1933 that the United Kingdom made formal and definite protest. The general toleration of the international community therefore shows that the Norwegian system was not regarded as contrary to international law. For these reasons, the Court concluded that the method employed by the Decree of 1935 is not contrary to international law; and that the base-lines fixed by the Decree are not contrary to international law either.

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Chapter 10: State Responsibility CASE CONCERNING THE BARCELONA TRACTION, LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY, LIMITED (SECOND PHASE) Judgment of 5 February 1970 The Barcelona Traction, Light and Power Company, Limited, was incorporated in 1911 in Toronto (Canada), where it has its head office. For the purpose of creating and developing an electric power production and distribution system in Catalonia (Spain) it formed a number of subsidiary companies, of which some had their registered offices in Canada and the others in Spain. In 1936 the subsidiary companies supplied the major part of Catalonia's electricity requirements. According to the Belgian Government, some years after the First World War Barcelona Traction share capital came to be very largely held by Belgian nationals, but the Spanish Government contends that the Belgian nationality of the shareholders is not proven. Barcelona Traction issued several series of bonds, principally in sterling. The sterling bonds were serviced out of transfers to Barcelona Traction effected by the subsidiary companies operating in Spain. In 1936 the servicing of the Barcelona Traction bonds was suspended on account of the Spanish civil war. After that war the Spanish exchange control authorities refused to authorize the transfer of the foreign currency necessary for the resumption of the servicing of the sterling bonds. Subsequently, when the Belgian Government complained of this, the Spanish Government stated that the transfers could not be authorized unless it were shown that the foreign currency was to be used to repay debts arising from the genuine importation of foreign capital into Spain and that this had not been established. In 1948 three Spanish holders of recently acquired Barcelona Traction sterling bonds petitioned the court of Reus (Province of Tarragona) for a declaration adjudging the company bankrupt, on account of failure to pay the interest on the bonds. On 12 February 1948 a judgment was given declaring the company bankrupt and ordering the seizure of the assets of Barcelona Traction and of two of its subsidiary companies. In its memorial of June 15, 1959, the Belgian Government asked the International Court of Justice to decide that the behavior of the organs of the Spanish State in declaring the Barcelona Traction Company in bankruptcy and seizing then liquidated its assets was contrary to international law, and that the Spanish State was responsible for the resulting injury. The Court found that Belgium lacked jus standi to exercise diplomatic protection of shareholders in a Canadian company with respect to measures taken against that company in Spain. The Court observed that when a State admitted into its territory foreign investments or foreign nationals it was bound to extend to them the protection of the law and assumed obligations concerning the treatment to be afforded them. But such

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obligations however were neither absolute nor unqualified because such obligation is not in the nature of an erga omnes obligation. That is why in order to bring a claim in respect of the breach of such an obligation, a State must first establish its right to do so, for the rules on the subject rest on two oppositions. 1. The first is that the defendant state has broken an obligation towards the national state in respect of its nationals. 2. The second is that only the party to whom an international obligation is due can bring a claim in respect of its breach. In the present state of the law, the protection of shareholders requires that resources be had to treaty stipulations or special agreements directly concluded between the private investor and the state in which the investment is placed. In this case, no such instrument is in force between the parties. A theory has been developed to the effect that the state of the shareholders has a right of diplomatic protection when state whose responsibility is invoked is the national state of the company. However, this theory is certainly not applicable to the present case since Spain is not the national state of Barcelona Traction but a national state of Canada. On the other hand, the court considers that in the field of diplomatic protection as in all other fields and international la, it is necessary that the law be applied reasonably. It has been suggested that if in a given case, it is not possible to apply the general rule that the right of diplomatic protection of a company belongs to its national state, considerations of equity might call for the possibility of protection of the shareholders in question by their own national state. This hypothesis does not correspond to the circumstances of the present case. The traditional rule attributes the right of diplomatic protection of a corporate entity to the state under the laws of which it is incorporated and in whose territory it has its registered office. In the present case, it is not disputed that the company was incorporated in Canada and has its registered office in that country. For the above reasons the court is not of the opinion that in the particular circumstances of the present case jus standi is conferred on the Belgian Government by considerations of equity.

CAIRE CLAIM

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(France v. Mexico) French-Mexican Claims Commission 1929 RIAA v. 516 [Caire, a French national, was killed in Mexico by Mexican soldiers after they had demanded money from him.] Verzijl, Presiding Commissioner (4) Responsibility of Mexico for actions of individual military personnel, acting without orders or against the wishes of their commanding officers and independently of the needs and aims of the revolution. In approaching the examination of the questions indicated under 4 in the light of the general principles I have just outlined, I should like to make clear first of all that I am interpreting the said principles in accordance with the doctrine of the “objective responsibility” of the States, that is, the responsibility for the acts of the officials or organs of a State, which may devolve upon it even in the absence of any “fault” of its own. It is widely known that theoretical conceptions in this sphere have advanced a great deal in recent times, and that the innovating work of Dionisio Anzilotti in particular has paved the way for new ideas, which no longer rank the responsibility of the State for the acts of its officials as subordinate to the question of the “fault” attaching to the State itself. Without going into the question of whether these new ideas, which are perhaps too absolute, may require some modifications in the direction proposed by Dr. Karl Strupp, I can say that I regard them as perfectly correct in that they tend to impute to the State, in international affairs, the responsibility for all the acts committed by its officials or organs which constitute offences from the point of view of the law of the nations, whether the official or organ in question has acted within or exceeded the limits of his competence. “It is generally agreed,” as M. Bourquin has rightly said, “that acts committed by the officials and agent of a State entail the international responsibility of that State, even if the perpetrator did not have specific authorization.” This responsibility does not find its justification in general principles --- I mean those principles regulating the judicial organization of the State. The act of an official is only judicially established as an act of State if such an act lies within the official’s sphere of competence. The act of an official operating beyond this competence is not an act of State. It should not in principle, therefore, affect the responsibility of the State. If it is accepted in international law that the position is different, it is for reasons peculiar to the mechanism of international life; it is because it is felt that international relations would become too difficult, too complicated and too insecure if foreign States were obliged to take into account the often complex judicial arrangements that regulate competence in the international affairs of a State. From this it is immediately clear that in the hypothesis under consideration, the international responsibility of the State is purely objective in character, and that it rests on an idea of guarantee, in which the subjective notion of fault plays no part.

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But in order to be able to admit this so-called objective responsibility of the State for acts committed by its officials or organs outside their competence, they must have acted at least to all appearances as competent officials or organs, or they must have used powers or methods appropriate to their official capacity. If the principles stated above are applied to the present case, and if it is taken into account that the perpetrators of the murder of M.J.B. Caire were military personnel occupying the ranks of “mayor” and “captain primero” aided by a few privates, it is found that the conditions of responsibility formulated above are completely fulfilled. The officers in question, whatever their previous record, consistently conducted themselves as officers in the brigade of the Villista General, Tomas Urbina; in this capacity they began by exacting the remittance of certain sums of money; they continued by having the victim taken to a barracks of the occupying troops; and it was clearly because of the refusal of M. Caire to meet their repeated demands that they finally shot him. Under these circumstances, there remains no doubt that, even if they are to be regarded as having acted outside their competence, which is by no means certain, and even if their superior officers issued a counter-order, these two officers have involved the responsibility of the State, in view of the fact that they acted in their capacity of officers and used the means placed at their disposition by virtue of that capacity. On these grounds, I have no hesitation in stating that in accordance with the most authoritative doctrine supported by numerous arbitral awards, the events of 11 December 1914, which led to the death of M.J.B. Caire, fall within the category of acts for which international responsibility devolves upon the State to which the perpetrators of the injury are amenable.

CORFU CHANNEL CASE (judgment of 9April 1949)

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The facts are as follows. On October 22nd, 1946, two British cruisers and two destroyers, coming from the south, entered the North Corfu Strait. The channel they were following, which was in Albanian waters, was regarded as safe: it had been swept in 1944 and check-swept in 1945. One of the destroyers, the Saumarez, when off Saranda, struck a mine and was gravely damaged. The other destroyer, the Volage, was sent to her assistance and, while towing her, struck another mine and was also seriously damaged. Forty-five British officers and sailors lost their lives, and forty-two others were wounded. An incident had already occurred in these waters on May 15th, 1946: an Albanian battery had fired in the direction of two British cruisers. The United Kingdom Government had protested, stating that innocent passage through straits is a right recognized by international law; the Albanian Government had replied that foreign warships and merchant vessels had no right to pass through Albanian territorial waters without prior authorization; and on August 2nd, 1946, the United Kingdom Government had replied that if, in the future, fire was opened on a British warship passing through the channel, the fire would be returned. Finally, on September 21st, 1946, the Admiralty in London had cabled to the British Commander-in-Chief in the Mediterranean to the following x effect: "Establishment of diplomatic relations with Albania is again under consideration by His Majesty's Government who wish to know whether the Albanian Government have learnt to behave themselves. Information is requested whether any ships under your command have passed through the North Corfu Strait since August and, if not, whether you intend them to do so shortly." After the explosions on October 22nd, the United Kingdom Government sent a Note to Tirana announcing its intention to sweep the Corfu Channel shortly. The reply was that this consent would not be given unless the operation in question took place outside Albanian territorial waters and that any sweep undertaken in those waters would be a violation of Albania's sovereignty. The sweep effected by the British Navy took place on November 12th/13th 1946, in Albanian territorial waters and within the limits of the channel previously swept. Twenty-two moored mines were cut; they were mines of the German GY type. The two Parties concluded a Special Agreement asking the Court to give judgment on the following questions: 1. Is Albania responsible for the explosions, and is there a duty to pay compensation? 2. Has the United Kingdom violated international law by the acts of its Navy in Albanian waters, first on the day on which the explosions occurred and, secondly, on November 12 and 13, 1946, when it undertook a sweep of the Strait? 1.

In its Judgment the Court declared on the first question that Albania was responsible.

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The Court finds, in the first place, that the explosions were caused by mines belonging to the minefield discovered on November 13th. It is not, indeed, contested that this minefield had been recently laid; it was in the channel, which had been previously swept and check-swept and could be regarded as safe, that the explosions had taken place. The nature of the damage shows that it was due to mines of the same type as those swept on November 13th; finally, the theory that the mines discovered on November 13th might have been laid after the explosions on October 22nd is too improbable to be accepted. In these circumstances the question arises what is the legal basis of Albania's responsibility? The Court does not feel that it need pay serious attention to the suggestion that Albania herself laid the mines: that suggestion was only put forward pro memoria, without evidence in support, and could not be reconciled with the undisputed fact that, on the whole Albanian littoral, there are only a few launches and motor boats. But the United Kingdom also alleged the connivance of Albania: that the mine laying had been carried out by two Yugoslav warships by the request of Albania, or with her acquiescence. The Court finds that this collusion has not been proved. A charge of such exceptional gravity against a State would require a degree of certainty that has not been reached here, and the origin of the mines laid in Albanian territorial waters remains a matter for conjecture. The United Kingdom also argued that, whoever might be the authors of the mine laying, it could not have been effected without Albania's knowledge. True, the mere fact that mines were laid in Albanian waters neither involves prima facie responsibility nor does it shift the burden of proof. On the other hand, the exclusive control exercised by a State within its frontiers may make it impossible to furnish direct proof of facts which would involve its responsibility in case of a violation of international law. The State which is the victim must, in that ease, be allowed a more liberal recourse to inferences of fact and circumstantial evidence; such indirect evidence must be regarded as of especial weight when based on a series of facts, linked together and leading logically to a single conclusion. In the present case two series of facts, which corroborate one another, have to be considered. The first relates to the Albanian Government's attitude before and after the catastrophe. The laying of the mines took place in a period in which it had shown its intention to keep a jealous watch on its territorial waters and in which it was requiring prior authorization before they were entered, this vigilance sometimes going so far as to involve the use of force: all of which render the assertion of ignorance a priori improbable. The second series of facts relates to the possibility of observing the mine laying from the Albanian coast. Geographically, the channel is easily watched: it is dominated

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by heights offering excellent observation points, and it runs close to the coast (the nearest mine was 500 m. from the shore). 2. In regard to the second question, The Court declared that the United Kingdom did not violate Albanian sovereignty on October 22; but it declared that it violated that sovereignty on November 12th/13th, and that this declaration, in itself, constituted appropriate satisfaction. The Albanian claim to make the passage of ships conditional on a prior authorization conflicts with the generally admitted principle that States, in time of peace, have a right to send their warships through straits used for international navigation between two parts of the high seas, provided that the passage is innocent. The Corfu Strait belongs geographically to this category, even though it is only of secondary importance (in the sense that it is not a necessary route between two parts of the high seas) and irrespective of the volume of traffic passing through it. A fact of particular importance is that it constitutes a frontier between Albania and Greece, and that a part of the strait is wholly within the territorial waters of those States. It is a fact that the two States did not maintain normal relations, Greece having made territorial claims precisely with regard to a part of the coast bordering the strait. However, the Court is of opinion that Albania would have been justified in view of these exceptional circumstances, in issuing regulations in respect of the passage, but not in prohibiting such passage or in subjecting it to the requirement of special authorization. Albania has denied that the passage on October 22 was innocent. She alleges that it was a political mission and that the methods employed, the number of ships, their formation, armament, manoeuvres, etc. showed an intention to intimidate. The Court examined the different Albanian contentions so far as they appeared relevant. Its conclusion is that the passage was innocent both in its principle, since it was designed to affirm a right which had been unjustly denied, and in its methods of execution, which were not unreasonable in view of the firing from the Albanian battery on May 15th. As regards the operation on November 12th/13th, it was executed contrary to the clearly expressed wish of the Albanian Government; it did not have the consent of the international mine clearance organizations; it could not be justified as the exercise of the right of innocent passage. The United Kingdom has stated that its object was to secure the mines as quickly as possible for fear lest they should be taken away by the authors of the mine laying or by the Albanian authorities: this was presented either as a new and special application of the theory of intervention, by means of which the intervening State was acting to facilitate the task of the international tribunal, or as a method of self-protection or self-help. The Court cannot accept these lines of defense. It can only regard the alleged right of intervention as the manifestation of a policy of force which cannot find a place in international law. As regards the notion of self-help, the Court is also unable to accept it: between independent States the respect for territorial sovereignty is an essential foundation for international relations. Certainly, the Court recognizes the Albanian Government's complete failure to carry out its duties after the explosions and the dilatory 111

nature of its diplomatic Notes as extenuating circumstances for the action of the United Kingdom. But, to ensure respect for international law, of which it is the organ, the Court must declare that the action of the British Navy constituted a violation of Albanian sovereignty. This declaration is in accordance with the request made by Albania through her counsel and is in itself appropriate satisfaction

UNITED STATES V IRAN [1980] ICJ Rep.

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In its Judgment in the case concerning United States Diplomatic and Consular Staff in Tehran, the Court decided: (1) that Iran has violated and still violating obligations owed by it to the United States; (2) that these violations engage Iran’s responsibility; (3) that the Government of Iran must immediately release the United States nationals held as hostages and place the premises of the Embassy in the hands of the protecting power; (4) that no member of the United States diplomatic or consular staff may be kept in Iran to be subjected to any form of judicial proceedings or participate in them as witness; (5) that Iran is under an obligation to make reparation for the injury caused to the United States; and (6) that the form and amount of such reparation, failing agreement between the parties, shall be settled by the Court. (a)

The events of 4 November 1979 (paras. 56-68).

The first phase of the events underlying the Applicant’s claims covers the armed attack on the United States Embassy carried out on 2 November 1979 by Muslim Student Followers of the Imam’s Policy (further referred to as “the militants” in the judgment), the overrunning of its premises, the seizure of its inmates as hostages, the appropriation of its property and archives, and the conduct of the Iranian authorities in the face of these occurrences. The Court points out that the conduct of the militants on that occasion could be directly attributed to the Iranian State only if it were established that they were in fact acting on its behalf. The information before the Court did not suffice to establish this with due certainty. However, the Iranian State which, as the State to which the mission was accredited, was under obligation to take appropriate steps to protect the United States Embassy did nothing to prevent the attack, stop it before it reached its completion or oblige the militants to withdraw from the premises and release the hostages. This inaction was in contrast with the conduct of the Iranian authorities on several similar occasions at the same period, when they had taken appropriate steps. It constituted, the Court finds, a clear and serious violation of Iran’s obligations to the United States under Articles 22(2), 24, 25, 26, 27 and 29 of the 1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, Articles 5 and 36 of the 1963 Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, and of Article 11(14) of the 1955 Treaty. Further breaches of the 1963 Convention had been involved in failure to protect the Consulates at Tabriz and Shiraz. The Court is therefore led to conclude that on 4 November 1979, the Iranian authorities were fully aware of their obligations under the conventions in force, and also of the urgent need for action on their part, that they had the means at their disposal to perform their obligations, but that they completely failed to do so. (b)

Events since 4 November 1979 (paras. 69-79).

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The second phase of the events underlying the United States’ claims comprises the whole series of facts which occurred following the occupation of the Embassy by the militants. Though it was the duty of the Iranian Government to take every appropriate step to end the infringement of the inviolability of the Embassy premises and staff, and to offer reparation for the damage, it did nothing of the kind. Instead, expressions of approval were immediately heard from numerous Iranian authorities. Ayatollah Khomeini himself proclaimed the Iranian State’s endorsement of both the seizure of the premises and the detention of the hostages. He described the Embassy as a “centre of espionage,” declared that the hostages would (with some exceptions) remain “under arrest” until the United States had returned the former Shah and his property to Iran, and forbade all negotiation with the United States on the subject. Once organs of the Iranian State had thus given approval to the acts complained of and decided to perpetuate them as a means of pressure on the United States, those acts were transformed into acts of the Iranian State: the militants became agents of that State, which itself became internationally responsible for their acts. During the six months which ensued, the situation underwent no material change: the Court’s Order of 15 December 1979 was publicly rejected by Iran, while Ayatollah declared that the detention of hostages would continue until the new Iranian parliament had taken a decision as to their fate. The Iranian authorities’ decision to continue the subjection of the Embassy to occupation, and of its staff to detention as hostages, gave rise to repeated and multiple breaches of Iran’s treaty obligations, additional to those already committed at the time of the seizure of the Embassy (1961 Convention: Arts. 22, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 29, 1963 Convention: inter alia, Art. 33; Treaty, Art. II[4]). With regard to the Charge` d affaires and two other members of the United States mission who have been in the Iranian Ministry of Foreign Affairs since 4 November 1979 the Court finds that the Iranian authorities have withheld from them the protection and facilities necessary to allow them to leave the Ministry in safety. Accordingly, it appears to the Court that in their respect there have been breaches of Articles 26 and 29 of the 1961 Vienna Convention. Taking note, furthermore, that various Iranian authorities have threatened to have some of the hostages submitted to trial before a court, or to compel them to bear witness, the Court considers that, if put into effect, that intention would constitute a breach of Article 31 of the same Convention.

HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY CLAIM U.S. v Great Britain (1920)

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1920 RIAA vi. 42 In 1988, the collection of a tax newly imposed by Great Britain on the natives of the Protectorate of the Sierra Leone known as the “hut tax” was the signal for a serious and widespread revolt in the Ronietta district. In the course of the rebellion all the claimants Missions were attacked, and either destroyed or damaged, and some of the missionaries were murdered. The contention of the United States Government before the Tribunal is that the revolt was the result of the imposition and attempted collection of the “hut tax”; that it was within the knowledge of the British Government that this tax was the object of deep native resentment; that in the face of the native danger the British government wholly failed to take proper steps for the maintenance of order and protection of life and property; that the loss of life and damage to property was the result of this neglect and failure of duty; and therefore that it is liable to pay compensation. Even assuming that the “hut tax” was the effective cause of the rebellion, it was in itself a fiscal measure in accordance general usage in colonial administration. It was a measure to which the British Government was perfectly entitled to resort in the legitimate exercise of its sovereignty. It is well-established principle of international law that no government can be held responsible for the act of rebellious bodies of men committed in violation of its authority, where it is itself guilty of no breach of good faith, or of no negligence in suppressing insurrection. The claim was dismissed.

SHORT V IRAN U.S v. Iran (1987)

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Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal Alfred L.W. Short claims less than US$250,000 from government of Iran as presented by the United States of America v. The Islamic Republic of Iran decided on July 14, 1987. The claimant, Short, is an American national who was employed by Lockheed that is an American company in Iran. However, on February 8, 1979 he was evacuated from Iran on company orders due to the situation. The evacuation was 3 days before the Islamic Revolutionary Government took office. The claimant seeks compensation for salary and other losses resulting from his alleged expulsion contrary to international law. He relies on acts committed by the revolutionaries and declarations made by the revolution leader, Ayatollah Khomeini. The issue is whether or not the overthrown government or the successor government is responsible for the claims The tribunal decided, “Where a revolution leads to the establishment of a new government, the State is held responsible for the acts of the overthrown government insofar as the latter maintained control of the situation. The successor government is also held responsible for the acts imputable to the revolutionary movement which established it, even if those acts occurred prior to its establishment, as a consequence of the continuity existing between the new organization of the State and the organization of the revolutionary movement”. However, in this case the claimant failed to identify the agent of the revolutionary movement who acted and compelled him to leave Iran. The declaration of revolutionary leader was noted by the Tribunal as pronouncements of a general nature and did not specify that Americans should be expelled en masse. The acts of the supporters of a revolution [as opposed to its agents] cannot be attributed to the government following the success of the revolution just as the acts of the supporters of an existing government are not attributable to the government. The view of the Tribunal is that the claimant failed to prove that his departure from Iran can be imputed to the wrongful conduct of Iran. The claim is therefore dismissed.

CHORZOW FACTORY CASE Germany vs. Poland

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1928 PCIJ (Ser. A) No. 17 The case concerned the expropriation by Poland of a factory at Chorzow contrary, as the court had held, to the Geneva Convention of 1922 between Germany and Poland on Upper Silesia. In this judgment, the court ruled upon a claim by Germany for an indemnity for the damaged caused by the illegal expropriation. The action of Poland which the court has judged to be contrary to the Geneva Convention is not an expropriation; it is a seizure of property, rights and interest which cold not be expropriated even against compensation. The issue is whether or not the compensation due to German Government is necessary limited to the value of the undertaking at the moment of dispossession plus interest to the day of payment? This limitation would only be admissible if the Polish Government had the right to expropriate, and if it’s wrongful act consisted merely in not having paid the two companies the just price of what was expropriated. In the present case, such a limitation might result in placing Germany and the interest protected by the Geneva Convention, on behalf of which interest the German Government is acting, in a situation more unfavorable than that in which Germany and these interest would have been in Poland had respected the said convention. Such a consequence would not only be unjust, but also and above all incompatible with the aim of Article 6 and the following article of the Convention -- that is to say, the prohibition, in principle, of the liquidation of the property rights and interest of the German nationals and of companies controlled by German nationals in Upper Silesia—since it would be tantamount to rendering lawful liquidation and unlawful dispossession indistinguishable in so far as their financial results are concerned. The essential principle contained in the actual notion of an illegal act – principle which seems to be established by international practice and in particular by the decisions of arbitral tribunals—is that reparation must, as far as possible, wipe out all the consequences of the illegal act and re-establish the situation that would, in all probability have exited if that act had not been committed. Restitution in kind, or, if this is not possible, payment of the sum corresponding to the value which a restitution in kind would bear; the award, if need be, of damages for loss sustained which would not cover by the restitution in kind or payment to place it-- such are the principle which would serve to determine the amount of compensation due for an act contrary to international law. This conclusion particularly applies as regard the Geneva Convention, the object of which is to provide for the maintenance of economic life in Upper Silesia on the basis of respect for the status quo. The dispossession industrial undertaking and, if this be not possible, top pay its value at the time of the indemnification, which value is designed to take the place of restitution which has become impossible. To this obligation, in virtue of the general principles of international law, must be added, that for compensating loss

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sustained as the result of the seizure. The impossibility, on which the parties are agreed, of restoring the Chorzow factory could therefore have n other effect but that of substituting payment of the value of the undertaking for restitution; it would not be in conformity either with the principles of law or with the wish of the parties to infer from that agreement that the question of compensation must henceforth be dealt with as though an expropriation properly so called was involved.

Chapter 11: International Human Rights Law

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Legal Consequences of the Construction of a wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (Request for Advisory Opinion) Summary of the Advisory Opinion of 9 July 2004 Palestine, having been part of the Ottoman Empire, was at the end of the first world war, the subject of a class mandate entrusted by the League of Nations to Great Britain. The hostilities of 1948-1949, and the armistice demarcation line between Israeli and Arab Forces fixed by a general armistice agreement of April 3, 1949 between Israel and Jordan, referred to as the Green Line. The territories situated between the Green Line and the eastern boundaries of Palestine under the Mandate were occupied by Israel in 1967 during the armed conflict between Israel and Jordan. Thereon to combat terrorist attacks, Israel built the wall as fixed by the Israeli Government includes within the closed area (i.e . the part of the West bank lying between the Green Line and the wall) some 80 % of the settlers living in the occupied Palestinian Territory, and has been traced in such a way as to include within that area the great majority of the Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territory, including east Jerusalem. In this regard, the contentions of Palestine and other participants that the construction of the wall is an attempt to annex the territory contrary to the international law and a violation of the legal principle prohibiting theacquisition of territory by the use of force and that the de facto annexation of land interferes with the territorial sovereignty and consequently with the right of the Palestinians to self-determinations. For its part Israel note of the assurance that the construction of the wall does not amount to annexation and that the wall is of temporary nature. Israel contended that the construction of the wall is consistent with Article 51 of the charter of the U.N, its inherent right to selfdefense and state of necessity. What are the legal consequences arising from the construction of wall being built by Israel, the occupying power, in the occupied Palestinian territory, including in and around East Jerusalem? In sum, the Court finds that, from the material available to it, it is not convinced that the specific course Israel has chosen for the wall was necessary to attain its security objectives. The wall along the route chosen, and its associated regime gravely infringe a number of rights of Palestinians residing in the territory occupied by Israel, and the infringements resulting from that route cannot be justified by military exigencies or by the requirements of national security or public order. The construction of such a wall accordingly constitutes breaches by Israel of various of its obligations under the applicable international humanitarian law and human rights instruments.

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As to the principle of self-determination, the court notes that Israel is first obliged to comply with the international obligations it has breached by the construction of the wall in the occupied Palestinian Territory. Consequently, Israel is bound to comply with its obligations under international humanitarian law and international human rights law. The Court observes that Israel also has an obligation to put an end to the violation of its international obligations flowing from the construction of the wall in the occupied Palestinian territory. That the construction, the establishment of a closed area between the Green Line and the wall itself, and the creation of enclaves, have moreover imposed substantial restrictions on the freedom of movement of the inhabitants of the occupied Palestinian Territory. The construction of the wall would also deprive a significant number of Palestinians of the freedom to choose their residence. Since a significant number of Palestinians have already been compelled by the construction of the wall and its associated regime to depart from certain areas, a process that will continue as more of the wall is built, that construction, coupled with the establishment of the Israeli settlements is tending to alter the demographic composition of the occupied Palestinian territory. Hence, the construction of the wall and its associated regime impede the liberty of movement of the inhabitants of the occupied Palestinian territory. They also impede the right of the people to work, to health, to education and to an adequate standard of living. In sum the court points out that the obligations violated by Israel include certain obligations erga omnes. The obligations erga omnes violated by Israel are the obligation to respect the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination. Given the character and the importance of the rights and obligations involved, the Court is of the view that all states are under an obligation not to recognize the illegal situation resulting from the construction of the wall. Hence, the construction of the wall by Israel in the occupied Palestinian territory is contrary to international law.

Chapter 12: International Organizations

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REPARATION FOR INJURIES SUFFERED IN THE SERVICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS (Advisory Opinion of 11 April 1949) The United Nations General Assembly filed a Request for Opinion with the International Court of Justice (ICJ), referring to it questions concerning reparation for injuries suffered in the service of the United Nations (UN). Supposing an agent of the UN, in the performance of his duties, suffered injuries in circumstances involving the responsibility of a State, has the UN, as an organization, the capacity to bring an international claim against the responsible de jure or de facto government for reparation due in respect of the damage caused to the UN and to the victim or the persons entitled? And if so, how will the UN’s action be reconciled with rights as may be possessed by the State of which the victim is a national? The UN General Assembly in its Request for Opinion raised these questions in December 1948. The Court communicated the Request for Opinion to all States entitled to appear before it. Some states sent written statements. Some other representatives, including that of the UN Secretary General presented oral arguments. After the preliminary procedure, the Court then proceeded by defining terms in the Request and analyzing the clause “capacity to bring an international claim.” Definitely, the capacity belongs to the State. The question was, does it also belong to the UN as an organization? Does it have international personality? The UN Charter conferred upon the organization rights and obligations different from those of its member states. One of the most important political tasks of the organization is the maintenance of international peace and security. This task, along with the other rights and obligations, gives the organization a large measure of international personality and capacity to operate upon an international plane. Thus, it has international personality. But then, does the UN’s possessing rights and obligations and international personality give it the right to bring an international claim to obtain reparation from a state in respect of the damage caused by the injury of an agent of the organization in the course of the performance of his duties? The Court unanimously reached the conclusion that the organization has the capacity to bring an international claim against a state (whether a member or not) for damage resulting from a breach by that state of its obligations towards the organization. But what about a question involving an international claim against a state to obtain reparation due the victim or the persons entitled and not due the Organization itself? The Court answered the question in view of the matter of diplomatic protection of nationals. It said that if an international claim has for its basis a breach by the defendant state of an obligation towards the Organization, the Organization has the capacity to present a claim. 121

This is because in a case where the state of which the victim is a national could not complain of a breach of an obligation towards itself, the obligation is assumed in favor of the Organization. Inasmuch as the Organization entrusts its agents with important missions, the Organization has the capacity to exercise functional protection in respect of its agents. This is simple in cases involving member states, for they have assumed obligations towards the organization. In instances where the claim is brought against a non-member state, the Court opined that the members of the UN created an entity possessing objective international personality and not merely personality recognized by them alone.

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INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL ALLIANCE OF EDUCATORS V. QUISUMBING,ET.AL. The International School were hiring foreign and local teachers to compose its faculty and staff.There were four tests applied by the school to determine whether a teacher should be classified as a foreign hire or a local hire, namely: (a) the teacher's domicile ; (b) the teacher's home economy ;(c) the country to which the teacher owed economic allegiance; and (d) whether the individual was hired abroad specifically to work in the school, and was the school responsible for bringing the individual into Philippines.If the answer to any of the questions points to the Philippines, the faculty member would be classified as a local hire.At that time, the school was paying those forein hires a salary rate of 25 percent more than the salary rate of the local hires.The school also granted the foreign hires certain benefits not afforded to local hires such as housing, transportation, shipping costs, taxes, and home-leave travel allowance. The International School Alliance of Educators (ISAE),which represented the local hires( both Filipinos and foreigners), contested the difference of the salary rates during negotiations for a new collective bargaining agreement.The ISAE claimed that the point-of-hire classification used by the school was discriminatory as to Filipinos.The ISAE also stressed that the grant of higher salary to foreign hires constituted racial discrimination. The school, on their side, justified the difference in salaries and benefits on two significant economic disadvantages the foreign hires had to endure as opposed to local hires; (a) the dislocation factor and (b) the limited tenure.The school further contended that the ISAE had not presented evidence to show that the local hires performed work equal to foreign hires. The issue is whether or not the point-of-hire classification used by the school and the huge difference in salary rates and other benefits given to foreign hires were discriminatory to Filipinos. The Supreme Court ruled in favor if the ISAE, saying that the emloyees should be given equal pay for work of equal value.The point-of-hire classification employed by the school was an invalid classification. The Court determined that there was no reasonable distinction between the services rendered by those foreign hires and the local hires.The Court pointed out that Article 135 of the Labor Code, for instance, prohibits and penalizes the payment of lesser compensation to a female employee as against a male employee for work of equal value.Article 248 of the same Code declares it as unfair labor practice for an empoyer to discriminate with regard to wages in order to encourage or discourage membership in any labor organization.

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It is also important to note that Article VII(7) of the International Covenant on Economic, Social,and Cultural Rights provides that, "The State Parties to the present covenant recognize the right of everyone to the enjoyment of just and favorable conditions of work, which ensure in particular, remuneration which provides all workers, as a minimum, with fair wages and equal remuneration for work of equal value without distinction of any kind,in particular to women being guaranteed conditions of work not inferior to those enjoyed by men, with equal pay for equal work.The forgoing provisions impregnably institutionalize in this jurisdiction the long honored legal truism of ' equal pay for equal work.' Persons who work with subtantially equal qualifications, skill, effort, and responsibility, under similar conditions, should be paid similar salaries." The Supreme Court also rejected the school's argument that no evidence was presented to show that local hires performed work equal to that of foreign hires.The Court stated that if an employer accords employees the same position and rank, the presumption is that the employees perform equal work.The Court then ruled that since the local hires performed the same services as foreign hires did, they should be paid the same salaries...

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Chapter 13: Peaceful Settlement of International Dispute AERIAL INCIDENT OF 27 JULY 1995 (U.S. v. BULGARIA) 1960 ICJ 146

This case arose out of the destruction by Bulgarian anti-aircraft defense forces of an aircraft belonging to an Israeli airline. All fifty one passengers and seven crew members aboard were killed, including six Americal nationals Israel instituted proceedings before the Court by means of an Application in October 1957. Bulgaria having challenged the Court's jurisdiction to deal with the claim, Israel contended that, since Bulgaria had in 1921 accepted the compulsory jurisdiction of the Permanent Court of International Justice for an unlimited period, that acceptance became applicable, when Bulgaria was admitted to the United Nations in 1955, to the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice by virtue of Article 36, paragraph 5, of the present Court's Statute, which provides that declarations made under the Statute of the PCIJ and which are still in force shall be deemed, as between the parties to the present Court's Statute, to be acceptances applicable to the International Court of Justice for the period which they still have to run and in accordance with their terms. The issue is whether or not Bulgaria has jurisdiction over the case. its Judgment on the preliminary objections, delivered on 26 May 1959, the Court found that it was without jurisdiction on the ground that Article 36, paragraph 5, was intended to preserve only declarations in force as between States signatories of the United Nations Charter, and not subsequently to revive undertakings which had lapsed on the dissolution of the PCIJ. In order to find the basis for the jurisdiction of the Court, the Government of Israel invoked the Declaration of acceptance of compulsory jurisdiction signed by Bulgaria in 1921, at the same time as Protocol of Signature of the Statute of the Permanent Court of International Justice, and Article 36, paragraph 5, of the Statute of the International Court of Justice, which reads as follows: "Declarations made under Article 36 of the Statute of the Permanent Court of International Justice and which are skill in force shall be deemed, as between the parties to the present Statute, to be acceptances of the compulsory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice for the period which they still have to run and in accordance with their terms." To justify the application of the latter provision to the Bulgarian Declaration of 1921, the Government of Israel relied on the fact that Bulgaria became a party to the Statute of the International Court of Justice on December 14th, 1955, as the result of its admission to the United Nations. The Bulgarian Government denied that Article 36,

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paragraph 5, transferred the effect of its Declaration to the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice. The Court had to determine whether Article 36, paragraph 5, is applicable to the Bulgarian Declaration. That it should apply in respect of declarations made by States which were represented at the San Francisco Conference and were signatories of the Charter and of the Statute can easily be understood. But is this provision meant also to cover declarations made by other States, including Bulgaria? The text does not say so explicitly. The Court observes that at the time of the adoption of the Statute a fundamental difference existed between the position of the signatory States and of the other States which might subsequently be admitted to the United Nations. This difference derived from the situation which Article 36, paragraph 5, was meant to regulate, namely, the transfer to the International Court of Justice of declarations relating to the Permanent Court, which was on the point of disappearing. The question which the signatory States were easily able to resolve as between themselves at that time would arise in a quite different form in the future as regards the other States. Article 36, paragraph 5, considered in its application to States signatories of the Statute, effected a simple operation. The position would have been quite different in respect of declarations by non-signatory States. For the latter, such a transfer must necessarily involve two distinct operations, which might be separated by a considerable interval of time. On the one hand, old declarations would have had to have been preserved with immediate effect; on the other hand, they would have had to be transferred to the jurisdiction of the new Court. In addition to this fundamental difference in respect of the factors of the problem, there were special difficulties in resolving it in respect of acceptances by non-signatory States. In the case of signatory States, Article 36 paragraph 5, maintained an existing obligation while modifying its subject-matter. So far as non-signatory States were concerned, the Statute, in the absence of their consent, could neither maintain nor transform their original obligation. Shortly after the entry into force of the Statute, the dissolution of the Permanent Court freed them from that obligation. Accordingly, the question of a transformation of an existing obligation could no longer arise so far as they were concerned; all that could be envisaged in their case was the creation of a new obligation binding upon them. To extend Article 36, paragraph 5, to those States would be to allow that provision to do in their case something quite different from what it did in the case of signatory States. It is true that the States represented at San Francisco could have made an offer addressed to other States, for instance, an offer to consider their acceptance of the compulsory jurisdiction of the Permanent Court as an acceptance of the jurisdiction of the new Court, but there is nothing of this kind in Article 36, paragraph 5. To restrict the application of this provision to the signatory States is to take into account the purpose for which it was adopted. At the time of its adoption, the impending dissolution of the Permanent Court and, in consequence, the lapsing of acceptances of its compulsory jurisdiction were in contemplation. Rather than expecting that the signatory

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States of the new Statute would deposit new declarations of acceptance, it was sought to provide for this transitory situation by a transitional provision. The situation is entirely different when, the old Court and the acceptance of its compulsory jurisdiction having long since disappeared, a State becomes party to the Statute of the new Court. To the extent that the records of the San Francisco Conference provide any indication as to the scope of the application of Article 36, paragraph 5, they confirm that this paragraph was intended to deal with declarations of signatory States only and not with a State in the situation of Bulgaria. However, the Government of Israel construed Article 36, paragraph 5, as covering a declaration made by a State which had not participated in the San Francisco Conference and which only became a party to the Statute of the International Court of Justice much later. The Court, considering the matter from this angle also, found that Article 36, paragraph 5, could not in any event be operative as regards Bulgaria until the date of its admission to the United Nations, namely, December 14th, 1955. At that date, however, the Declaration of 1921 was no longer in force in consequence of the dissolution of the Permanent Court in 1946. The acceptance set out in that Declaration of the compulsory jurisdiction of the Permanent Court was devoid of object, since that Court was no longer in existence. And there is nothing in Article 36, paragraph 5, to reveal any intention of preserving all the declarations which were in existence at the time of the signature or entry into force of the Charter, regardless of the moment when a State having made a declaration became a party to the Statute. The provision determines, in respect of a State to which it applies, the birth of the compulsory jurisdiction of the new Court. It makes it subject to two conditions: (1) that the State having made the declaration should be a party to the Statute, (2) that the declaration of that State should still be in force. Since the Bulgarian Declaration had lapsed before Bulgaria was admitted to the United Nations, it cannot be said that at that time that Declaration was still in force. The second condition is therefore not satisfied in the present case. Thus the Court finds that Article 36, paragraph 5, is not applicable to the Bulgarian Declaration of 1921. This view is confirmed by the fact that it was the clear intention inspiring Article 36, paragraph 5, to preserve existing acceptances and not to restore legal force to undertakings which had expired. On the other hand, in seeking and obtaining admission to the United Nations, Bulgaria accepted all the provisions of the Statute, including Article 36. But Bulgaria's acceptance of Article 36, paragraph 5, does not constitute consent to the compulsory jurisdiction of the Court, such consent can validly be given only in accordance with Article 36, paragraph 2. Article 36, paragraph 5, cannot therefore lead the Court to find that the Bulgarian Declaration of 1921 provides a basis for its jurisdiction to deal with the case. In these circumstances it is unnecessary for the Court to proceed to consideration of the other Bulgarian Preliminary Objections

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INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE (30 June 1995) CASE CONCERNING EAST TIMOR (Portugal v. Australia) East Timor is at the eastern part of the island of Timor; it includes the island of Atauro, 25 kilometers to the north. In the sixteenth century, East Timor became a colony of Portugal which remained there until 1975. The western part of the island came under the Dutch rule and later became part of independent Indonesia. In resolution 1542 (XV) of 15 December 1960, the United Nation General Assembly stated that East Timor is a non-self-governing territory within the meaning of the charter and it considered the territory under the administration of Portugal. Portugal accepted this position in 1974. In August 1975, following internal disturbance in East Timor, the Portuguese civil and military authorities withdrew from the mainland of East Timor to the island of Atauro. On December 7, 1975, the armed forces of Indonesia intervened in East Timor and the following day, the Portuguese left Atauro and East Timor altogether. Since their departure, Indonesia has occupied the Territory, and the parties acknowledge that the Territory has remained under the effective control of the State. Asserting that on 31 May 1976 the people of East Timor had requested Indonesia “to accept East Timor as an integrated part of the Republic of Indonesia”, on 17 July 1976 Indonesia enacted a law incorporating the territory as part of its national territory. On December 1976, the Security Council in a resolution called upon al states to respect the territorial integrity of East Timor as well as the inalienable right of its people to self-determination. It also recognized Portugal as the administering power of East Timor. The incorporation of East Timor as part of Indonesia was recognized de facto on 20 January 1978. This was followed by a negotiation between Australia and Indonesia about the delimitation of the continental shelf between the Australia and East Timor. This did not come into fruition, so, instead a treaty was concluded about a provisional arrangement for a joint exploration and exploitation of the resources of the said area. In the present case, Portugal alleges that Australia failed to respect the duties and right of Portugal as administering power of East Timor and that it failed to respect the right to self determination of the people of East Timor. Australia, on the other hand contends that the present case would require the court to rule on the rights and obligation of a state not a party to the proceeding, namely Indonesia. The issue is whether or not the ICJ can rule on the rights and obligation of a state not a party to a proceeding.

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In the present case, the Court notes that Portugal’s claim that in entering into a Treaty with Indonesia, Australia violated the obligation to respect Portugal’s status as administering Power and that of East Timor as a non-self-governing territory, is based on the assertion that Portugal alone, in its capacity as administering Power, had the power to enter into the Treaty on behalf of East Timor. The last resolution of the Security Council on East Timor goes back to 1976 and the last resolution of the General Assembly to 1982. Portugal takes no account of the passage of time and the development that have taken place since then. The Security Council resolutions are not resolutions which are binding under Chapter VII of the charter or otherwise, moreover they are not framed in mandatory terms. The Court considered that the erga omnes character of a norm and the rule of consent to jurisdiction are two different things. Whatever the nature of the obligations invoked, the Court could not rule on the lawfulness of the conduct of a State when its judgment would imply an evaluation of the lawfulness of the conduct of another State which is not a party to the case. Where this is so, the Court cannot act, even if the right in question is a right erga omnes.

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NICARAGUA V UNITED STATES I.C.J. 392 The Court observes that it ought not to indicate provisional measures unless the provisions invoked by the Applicant appear, prima facie, to afford a basis on which its jurisdiction might be founded. It does not now have to determine the validity or invalidity of the declaration of Nicaragua of 24 1929 and, the question whether or not Nicaragua could does rely on the United States Declaration of 16 1946, or the question whether , as a result of the declaration of 6 April 1984, the Application is excluded as from this date from the scope of the United States acceptance of the compulsory jurisdiction of the Court. It finds that the declarations deposited by the two Parties respectively in 1929 and in 1946 nevertheless appear to afford a basis on which the jurisdiction of the Court might be founded. Provisional Measures The Order sets out the circumstances alleged by Nicaragua as requiring the indication of provisional measures, and the material it has provided to support its allegations. The Government of the United States has stated that the United States does not intend to engage in a debate concerning the facts alleged by Nicaragua, given the absence of jurisdiction, but it has admitted no factual allegations by Nicaragua whatever. The Court had available to it considerable information concerning the facts of the present case, including of official statements of United States authorities, and has to consider whether the circumstances drawn to its attention require the indication of provisional measures, but it makes it clear that the right of the respondent to dispute the fats alleged must remain unaffected by its decision. After setting out the rights which, according to Nicaragua, should be urgently protected by the indication of provisional measures, the Court considers three objections raised by the United States (in addition to the objection relating to jurisdiction) against the indication of such measures. First, the indication of provisional measures would interfere with the negotiations being conducted in the context of the work of the Contadora Group, and would directly involve the rights and interests of States not Parties to this Case; secondly, these negotiations constituted a regional process within which Nicaragua is under a good faith obligation to negotiate, thirdly, the Application by Nicaragua raises issues which should more properly be committed to resolution by the political organs of the United Nations and of Organization of American States. Nicaragua disputes the relevance to this case of the Contadora process in which it is actively participating; denies that its claims could prejudice the rights of other States, and recalls previous decisions of the Court, by virtue which, in its opinion, the Court is not required to decline to undertake an essentially judicial task merely because the question before it is intertwined with political questions.

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The Court finds that the circumstances require that it should indicate provisional measures, as provided by Article 41 of the Statute, in order to preserve the rights claims. It emphasizes that its decision in no way prejudges the question of its jurisdiction to deal with the merits of the case and leaves unaffected the right of the Government of the United States and of the Government of Nicaragua to submit arguments in respect of such jurisdiction or such merits. For these reasons, the Court renders the following decisions: •

Rejects the request made by the United States of America that the proceedings on the Application filed by the Republic of Nicaragua on 9 1984, and on the request filed the same day by the Republic of Nicaragua for the indication of provisional measures, be terminated by the removal of the case from the list;



Pending its final decision in the proceedings instituted on 9 April 1984 by the Republic of Nicaragua against the United States of America, the following provisional measures:



The United States of America should immediately cease and refrain from any action restricting, blocking or endangering access to or from Nicaraguan ports, and, in particular, the laying of mines;



The right to sovereignty and to political independence possessed by the Republic of Nicaragua, like any other State of the region or of the world, should be fully respected and should not in any way be jeopardized by any military and paramilitary activities which are prohibited by the principles of international law, in particular the principle that States should refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or the political independence of any State, and the principle concerning the duty not to intervene in matters within the domestic jurisdiction of a State, principles embodied in the United Nations Charter and the Charter of the Organization of American States.



The Government of the United States of America and the Republic of Nicaragua should each of them ensure that no action is taken which might prejudice the rights of the other Party in respect of the carrying out of whatever decision the Court may render in the case. • Decides further that, until the Court delivers its final judgment in the present case, it will keep the matters covered by this Order continuously under review. • Decides that the written proceedings shall first be addressed to the questions of the jurisdiction of the Court to entertain the dispute and of the admissibility of the Application and reserves the fixing of the time-limits for the said written proceedings, and the subsequent procedure for further decision.

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CASE CONCERNING LEGALITY OF USE OF FORCE (Yugoslavia v. United States of America) 1999 ICJ Rep. The present case was requested by the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia against the NATO states, in relation to the bombings being carried out by the NATO forces in Yugoslavia. The issue is whether or not the ICJ has jurisdiction over the dispute between the United States and Yugoslavia. The International Court of Justice ruled as follows: The court, being profoundly concerned with human tragedy, the loss of life and enormous suffering in Kosovo which form the background of present dispute, and with the continuing loss of life and human suffering in all parts of Yugoslavia realizes that the present circumstances raises very serious of international law. The court herein deems necessary to emphasize that all parties appearing before it must act in conformity with their obligations under the UN charter and other rules of international law, including humanitarian law. The ICJ, under its statute, does not automatically have jurisdiction over legal dispute between States parties to that statute or between other States to whom access to the court has been granted. The court has repeatedly stated “that one of the fundamental principles of its statute is that it cannot decide a dispute between States without the consent of those states to its jurisdiction, and whereas, the court can only therefore exercise jurisdiction only between states parties to a dispute who not only have access to the court but also have accepted the jurisdiction of the court, either in general form or for the individual dispute concerned. On the request for provisional measures the court need not before deciding whether or not to indicate them, finally satisfy itself that it has jurisdiction on the merits of the case, yet it ought not to indicate such measures unless the provisions invoked by the applicant appear, prima facie, to afford a basis on which the jurisdiction of the Court might be established. Yugoslavia, in its application claims to found the jurisdiction of the court upon Article IX of the Genocide Convention which provides: “Disputes between the contracting parties relating to the interpretation, application or fulfillment of the present convention, including those relating to the responsibility of a state for genocide or for any of the other acts enumerated in Article III, shall be submitted to the ICJ at the request of any parties to the dispute;” whereas, it is not disputed that both Yugoslavia and the US are parties to the Genocide Convention; but

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whereas the US ratified the convention on November 25, 1988, it made the following reservation: “That with reference to Article IX of the convention, before any dispute to which the US is a party may be submitted to the jurisdiction of the ICJ under this Article, the specific consent of the US is required in each case”. Yugoslavia then disputed the US interpretation of the Genocide Convention but submitted no argument concerning the reservation made by the US. The consequence of Article IX cannot found the jurisdiction of the court to entertain a dispute between Yugoslavia and the US alleged to fall within its provisions; and, whereas, that Article manifestly does not constitute a basis of jurisdiction in the present case. Clearly, in the absence of consent by the United States, given pursuant to Article 38, paragraph 5, of the Rules, the Court cannot exercise jurisdiction in the instant case. Hence, the request for the indication of provisional measures submitted by the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia on April 29, 1999 is hereby rejected.

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EL SALVADOR V HONDURAS Nicaragua Intervention 1992 ICJ Reports There is a land, Island and maritime frontier dispute between El Salvador and Honduras. Unfortunately, the said subject of the dispute includes the Gulf of Fonesca, over which, the Republic of Nicaragua has rights to be protected on the said Gulf. Upon knowing the case, Nicaragua filed an application for permission to intervene in the dispute between El Salvador and Honduras. The grounds for the filing are: 1. To protect the legal rights of the Republic of Nicaragua in the Gulf of Fonesca and the adjacent maritime areas by all legal means available. 2. To intervene in the proceedings in order to inform the court of the nature of the legal rights of Nicaragua which are in issue in the dispute. Nicaragua filed this Application in Relation to Article 62 which states that “Should a state consider it has an interest which may be affected by the decision in the case, it may submit a request to the court to be permitted to intervene” and Article 81, par.2 which states “States seeking to intervene is required to specify the case to which it relates and to set out: a. The interest of a legal nature which the state applying to intervene considers maybe affected by the decision in that case; b. The precise object of intervention; c. Any basis of jurisdiction of jurisdiction which is claimed to exist as between the state applying to intervene and the parties to the case; The court initially granted the application of Nicaragua. El Salvador contested the application because it argued that Nicaragua failed to present a “valid link of jurisdiction” as require in Art.81, par.2. Is there a need for Nicaragua to show a “valid link of jurisdiction” to intervene in the case? The court held that Nicaragua does not need to show a “valid link of jurisdiction” because it will only play as an intervenor. It wants only to ensure that its right will not be prejudiced by the decision of the court. It only wants to inform the court about its rights in the Gulf of Fonesca. It would be different if Nicaragua would be a third party in the case which will not just be given the right to be heard but also to present its claims against the parties. If that’s the case, the need of a “valid link of jurisdiction” is needed. The rights of Nicaragua as an intervenor would be limited to the right to be heard, nothing more, nothing less.

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Chapter 14: The Use of Force Short of War LEGALITY OF THE THREAT OR USE OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS Advisory Opinion of 8 July 1996 The Court handed down its Advisory Opinion on the request made by the General Assembly of the United Nations on the question concerning the Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons. The most directly relevant applicable law governing the question is that relating to the use of force enshrined in the United Nations Charter and the law applicable in armed conflict which regulates the conduct of hostilities, together with any specific treaties on nuclear weapons that the Court might determine to be relevant. 1) UN Charter In Article 2, paragraph 4, of the Charter the use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of another State or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations is prohibited. This prohibition of the use of force is to be considered in the light of other relevant provisions of the Charter. In Article 51, the Charter recognizes the inherent right of individual or collective self-defense if an armed attack occurs. A further lawful use of force is envisaged in Article 42, whereby the Security Council may take military enforcement measures in conformity with Chapter VII of the Charter. These provisions do not refer to specific weapons. They apply to any use of force, regardless of the weapons employed. The Charter neither expressly prohibits, nor permits, the use of any specific weapon, including nuclear weapons. The entitlement to resort to self-defense under Article 51 is subject to the conditions of necessity and proportionality. And the Court notes that the very nature of all nuclear weapons and the profound risks associated therewith are further considerations to be borne in mind by States believing they can exercise a nuclear response in self-defense in accordance with the requirements of proportionality. In order to lessen or eliminate the risk of unlawful attack, States sometimes signal that they possess certain weapons to use in self-defense against any State violating their territorial integrity or political independence. Whether a signaled intention to use force if certain events occur is or is not a "threat" within Article 2, paragraph 4, of the Charter depends upon various factors. The notions of "threat" and "use" of force under Article 2, paragraph 4, of the Charter stand together in the sense that if the use of force itself in a

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given case is illegal - for whatever reason - the threat to use such force will likewise be illegal. Thus, a threat or use of force by means of nuclear weapons that is contrary to Article 2, paragraph 4, of the United Nations Charter and that fails to meet all the requirements of Article 51, is unlawful. 2) International customary law The Members of the international community are profoundly divided on the matter of whether non-recourse to nuclear weapons over the past fifty years constitutes the expression of an opinio juris. Under these circumstances the Court does not consider itself able to find that there is such an opinio juris. It points out that the adoption each year by the General Assembly, by a large majority, of resolutions recalling the content of resolution 1653 (XVI), and requesting the member States to conclude a convention prohibiting the use of nuclear weapons in any circumstance, reveals the desire of a very large section of the international community to take, by a specific and express prohibition of the use of nuclear weapons, a significant step forward along the road to complete nuclear disarmament. The emergence, as lex lata, of a customary rule specifically prohibiting the use of nuclear weapons as such is hampered by the continuing tensions between the nascent opinio juris on the one hand, and the still strong adherence to the doctrine of deterrence(in which the right to use those weapons in the exercise of the right to self-defence against an armed attack threatening the vital security interests of the State is reserved) on the other. There is in neither customary nor conventional international law any specific authorization or comprehensive and universal prohibition of the threat or use of nuclear weapons. 3) A) International laws applicable in situations of armed conflict There is no principle or rule of international law which would make the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons or of any other weapons dependent on a specific authorization. State practice shows that the illegality of the use of certain weapons as such does not result from an absence of authorization but, on the contrary, is formulated in terms of prohibition. It does not seem to the Court that the use of nuclear weapons can be regarded as specifically prohibited on the basis of certain provisions of the Second Hague Declaration of 1899, the Regulations annexed to the Hague Convention IV of 1907 or the 1925 Geneva Protocol. The pattern until now has been for weapons of mass destruction to be declared illegal by specific instruments. But the Court does not find any specific prohibition of recourse to nuclear weapons in treaties expressly prohibiting the use of certain weapons of mass destruction; and observes that, although, in the last two decades,

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a great many negotiations have been conducted regarding nuclear weapons, they have not resulted in a treaty of general prohibition of the same kind as for bacteriological and chemical weapons. Treaties dealing exclusively with acquisition, manufacture, possession, deployment and testing of nuclear weapons, without specifically addressing their threat or use, certainly point to an increasing concern in the international community with these weapons; It concludes from this that these treaties could therefore be seen as foreshadowing a future general prohibition of the use of such weapons, but that they do not constitute such a prohibition by themselves. As to the treaties of Tlatelolco and Rarotonga and their Protocols, and also the declarations made in connection with the indefinite extension of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, it emerges from these instruments that: (a) a number of States have undertaken not to use nuclear weapons in specific zones (Latin America; the South Pacific) or against certain other States (non-nuclear-weapon States which are parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons); (b) nevertheless, even within this framework, the nuclear-weapon States have reserved the right to use nuclear weapons in certain circumstances; and (c) these reservations met with no objection from the parties to the Tlatelolco or Rarotonga Treaties or from the Security Council. B) International humanitarian law. After sketching the historical development of the body of rules which originally were called "laws and customs of war" and later came to be termed "international humanitarian law", the Court observes that the cardinal principles contained in the texts constituting the fabric of humanitarian law are the following. The first is aimed at the protection of the civilian population and civilian objects and establishes the distinction between combatants and non-combatants; States must never make civilians the object of attack and must consequently never use weapons that are incapable of distinguishing between civilian and military targets. According to the second principle, it is prohibited to cause unnecessary suffering to combatants: it is accordingly prohibited to use weapons causing them such harm or uselessly aggravating their suffering. In application of that second principle, States do not have unlimited freedom of choice of means in the weapons they use. The Court referred to the Martens Clause, which was first included in the Hague Convention II with Respect to the Laws and Customs of War on Land of 1899 and which has proved to be an effective means of addressing the rapid evolution of military technology. A modern version of that clause is to be found in Article 1, paragraph 2, of Additional Protocol I of 1977, which reads as follows:

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"In cases not covered by this Protocol or by other international agreements, civilians and combatants remain under the protection and authority of the principles of international law derived from established custom, from the principles of humanity and from the dictates of public conscience." The extensive codification of humanitarian law and the extent of the accession to the resultant treaties, as well as the fact that the denunciation clauses that existed in the codification instruments have never been used, have provided the international community with a corpus of treaty rules the great majority of which had already become customary and which reflected the most universally recognized humanitarian principles. These rules indicate the normal conduct and behavior expected of States. Turning to the applicability of the principles and rules of humanitarian law to a possible threat or use of nuclear weapons, the Court noted that nuclear weapons were invented after most of the principles and rules of humanitarian law applicable in armed conflict had already come into existence; the Conferences of 1949 and 1974-1977 left these weapons aside, and there is a qualitative as well as quantitative difference between nuclear weapons and all conventional arms. However, in the Court's view, it cannot be concluded from this that the established principles and rules of humanitarian law applicable in armed conflict did not apply to nuclear weapons. Such a conclusion would be incompatible with the intrinsically humanitarian character of the legal principles in question which permeates the entire law of armed conflict and applies to all forms of warfare and to all kinds of weapons, those of the past, those of the present and those of the future. In this respect it seems significant that the thesis that the rules of humanitarian law do not apply to the new weaponry, because of the newness of the latter, has not been advocated in the present proceedings. Thus, a threat or use of nuclear weapons should also be compatible with the requirements of the international law applicable in armed conflict particularly those of the principles and rules of international humanitarian law, as well as with specific obligations under treaties and other undertakings which expressly deal with nuclear weapons. It follows from the above-mentioned requirements that the threat or use of nuclear weapons would generally be contrary to the rules of international law applicable in armed conflict, and in particular the principles and rules of humanitarian law. 5) Principle of Neutrality The principle of neutrality, whatever its content, which is of a fundamental character similar to that of the humanitarian principles and rules, is applicable (subject to the relevant provisions of the United Nations Charter), to all international armed conflict, whatever type of weapons might be used. Although the applicability of the principles and rules of humanitarian law and of the principle of neutrality to nuclear weapons is hardly disputed, the conclusions to be drawn from this applicability are, on the other hand, controversial.

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According to one point of view, the fact that recourse to nuclear weapons is subject to and regulated by the law of armed conflict, does not necessarily mean that such recourse is as such prohibited. Another view holds that recourse to nuclear weapons, in view of the necessarily indiscriminate consequences of their use, could never be compatible with the principles and rules of humanitarian law and is therefore prohibited. A similar view has been expressed with respect to the effects of the principle of neutrality. Like the principles and rules of humanitarian law, that principle has therefore been considered by some to rule out the use of a weapon the effects of which simply cannot be contained within the territories of the contending States. In view of the unique characteristics of nuclear weapons, to which the Court has referred above, the use of such weapons in fact seems scarcely reconcilable with respect for the requirements of the law applicable in armed conflict. It considers nevertheless, that it does not have sufficient elements to enable it to conclude with certainty that the use of nuclear weapons would necessarily be at variance with the principles and rules of law applicable in armed conflict in any circumstance. Furthermore, the Court cannot lose sight of the fundamental right of every State to survival, and thus its right to resort to selfdefense, in accordance with Article 51 of the Charter, when its survival is at stake. Nor can it ignore the practice referred to as "policy of deterrence", to which an appreciable section of the international community adhered for many years. Accordingly, in view of the present state of international law viewed as a whole, the Court cannot reach a definitive conclusion as to the legality or illegality of the use of nuclear weapons by a State in an extreme circumstance of self-defense, in which its very survival would be at stake. 6) Obligation to pursue in good faith and bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament In the long run, international law, and with it the stability of the international order which it is intended to govern, are bound to suffer from the continuing difference of views with regard to the legal status of weapons as deadly as nuclear weapons. It is consequently important to put an end to this state of affairs: the long-promised complete nuclear disarmament appears to be the most appropriate means of achieving that result. In these circumstances, the Court appreciates the full importance of the recognition by Article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons an obligation to pursue in good faith and bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict and effective international control.

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Naulilaa case: Germany v. Portugal 1928 Versailles Swiss arbitral panel Portugal was neutral during the World War 1. Sometime in October, German officials went to a Portugese colony in Angola, Southwest Africa went to visit members of the post of Naulilaa. Southwest Africa was German and Naulilaa was Portuguese. They wanted to discuss food that would be imported, however they used translators to do the conference. Unable to speak the language clearly the Portuguese speakers felt threatened, so they fired upon the German speakers. Three Germans died. In retaliation, German troops destroyed forts and posts in Angola. The Portuguese people of that region left for safety. Native uprisings occurred shortly after. The issue is whether or not Germany’s reprisal is legal considering that they retaliated for an accident, without making a demand for redress and raided a Portugese colony The Arbitral Tribunal ruled that the Germany’s reprisals were illegal. The requisites for a legal reprisal are the following: (1) The occasion for the reprisal must be a previous act contrary to international law; (2) The reprisal must be preceded by an unsatisfied demand; (3) If the initial demand for redress is satisfied, no further demands may be made; (4) The reprisal must be proportionate to the offense. These rules, except for the third one, were supported and rearticulated. In addition, the Naulilaa decision added the fifth criteria that only a state can attempt a reprisal. Further, the tribunal discussed the reprisal doctrine as it had developed up until the First World War: Reprisals are an act of self-help on the part of the injured states, responding after an unsatisfied demand to an act contrary to international law on the part of the offending State…. They would be illegal if a previous act contrary to international law had not furnished the reason for them. They aim to impose on the offending State reparation…or the return to legality in avoidance of new offenses. In this case, the first, second and fourth requisites were not met for the following reasons: first, the retaliation was for a misunderstanding that was not a violation of international law; second, the German government did not make any demand on the Portuguese government prior to the reprisals. And lastly, the reprisals consisted of six separate acts, and they were not proportionate to the prior offending act. Even if it were proportional, this would still be considered excessive.

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Chapter 15: War and Neutrality THE CAROLINE INCIDENT DURING THE PATRIOT WAR It was in December of the depression year of 1837 that William Lyon Mackenzie made his abortive attempt to overthrow the government of Canada and set up a separate republic. His followers were defeated in a brief skirmish on the outskirts of Toronto, and on December 11, 1837, Mackenzie crossed to Grand Island so made his way to Buffalo. The border was in tumult. Threatened with the loss of their homesteads through foreclosure, many settlers were ready for any kind of desperate venture and only a spark was needed to set the border aflame again. Mackenzie's arrival in Buffalo seemed to be the spark, for he was greeted by the largest mass meeting in the history of the town, held in the Buffalo Opera House. There was open recruitment for the "Patriot Army" and when official protest was made through diplomatic channels, Americans were invited to join "exploration parties" and hunts for "deer and red foxes" in Canada. The overt act came when the "Patriot Army" under Van Rensselaer, appointed as General by Mackenzie, invaded Navy Island on December 13, 1837. Here the flag of the "Canadian Republic" was unfurled for the first time. The confused description of this flag is characteristic of the confusion of the record in regard to this little known war. One good authority says it had one star and two stripes, the latter representing upper and lower Canada; an equally good authority says it had two stars, with a moon breaking the clouds. And a soldier in Van Rensselaer's army says it had two stars, without any moon! The original landing party was composed of a little more than two dozen men, but Mackenzie lured volunteers with offers of free land after the conquest of Canada. In order to reinforce this party and to carry supplies, Mackenzie's sympathizers chartered the steamer Caroline, owned by William Wells, of Buffalo, and commanded by Captain Appleby of that city. In the morning of December 29, the Caroline left Buffalo and moved down the river to Black Rock. Here a stop was made and the American flag run up, the steamer then proceeding down the river toward Navy Island. The captain declared a volley of musket fire was directed at him from the Canadian shore, but no harm was done. Arriving at Navy, the Caroline, while docked, discharged "passengers and some freight.” At three o'clock in the afternoon, the steamer went to Schlosser's dock [later Niagara Falls] on the American side and after that made two trips to Navy, docking at 6:00 p.m. The captain says he has only ten men in his crew, but after he was tied up for the night 23 visitors were permitted to sleep on the ship, having no other place to stay. 141

About midnight the ship's watchman saw a number of boats approaching from Canada and sounded the alarm. This was a group sent by the British commander, Colonel Allan N. MacNab, to seize and destroy the Caroline, and was estimated by the ship's captain to include 70 to 80 men. In the ensuing fight, Amos Durfee was killed and a number of others were wounded. The Caroline was set adrift in flames. Thus an international situation precipitated. British armed forces had invaded American waters, killed an American citizen and destroyed an American vessel. But both of which, the citizen and the vessel, were aiding an armed invasion of Canadian territory. And Henry Arcularius, Commissary-General of New York State, in a later report states that a gun carriage belonging to the State of New York were recovered from Navy Island after the shooting was over. This affair was distorted for propaganda purposes that to this day it is one of the most difficult stories of all frontier history to nail down. Accounts of what happened vary widely, depending upon their source. One reputable journal of the day says 90 were killed, although it is quite definite that Durfee was the sole casualty. His body was brought to Buffalo and exhibited in front of recruiting headquarters, the Eagle Tavern, on the night of December 30. At the same time the Buffalo city guard was called out and the 47th militia brigade mobilized. The spectacle caused by this exhibition of Durfee's body is described by a writer of the time, "his pale forehead mangled by the pistol ball and his locks matted with blood! His friends and fellow citizens looked on the ghastly spectacle and thirsted for an opportunity to revenge him." The next day firemen and soldiers marched in a huge procession behind his casket and a young attorney delivered a funeral oration, "more exciting, thrilling and much more indignant than Mark Anthony's." Thus was the funeral of the frontier Caesar made a sounding board for propaganda. The pebble dropped in the pond of peace spread its ripples in an ever-widening circle. Henry Clay in the American Congress called the affair an "Outrage"; Canadian parliamentarians were equally bitter on the subject of "Piratical operations." British Consuls dropped sharply in London on the war scare while tempers mounted on both sides of the border.

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COMPAGNIE DE COMMERCE ET DE NAVIGATION D'EXTREME ORIENT, plaintiff-appellant, vs. THE HAMBURG AMERIKA PACKETFACHT ACTIEN GESELLSCHAFT, defendant-appellant. Gilbert, Cohn and Fisher for plaintiff-appellant. Crossfield and O'Brien for defendant-appellant.

This is an action by the Compagnie de Commerce et de Navigation D'Extreme Orient, a corporation duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the Republic of France, with its principal office in the city of Paris, France, and a branch office in the city of Saigon, against the Hamburg Amerika Packetfacht Actien Gesellschaft, a corporation duly organized under and by virtue of the laws of the Empire of Germany, with its principal office in the city of Hamburg, Germany, and represented in the city of Manila by Behn, Meyer & Company (Limited), a corporation. The plaintiff seeks to recover the full value if Saigon of a certain cargo of the steamship Sambia, alleged to amount to the sum of P266,930, Philippine currency, and prays that certain proceeds of the sale of said cargo, amounting to P135,766.01, now on deposit in this court, be applied on said judgment, and that judgment be rendered in favor of the plaintiff and against the defendant for such sum as may represent the difference between the said amount and the value of the payment and delivery unto plaintiff from said deposit, with legal interest and costs of suit. A charter party was executed between Compagnie de Commerce and the owners of the vessel Sambia, under which the former as charterer loaded on board the Sambia, at the port of Saigon, certain cargoes destined for the ports of Dunkirk and Hamburg in Europe. The Sambia, flying the German flag, could not in the judgment of its master, reach its ports of destination because of war (World War I) had been declared between Germany and France. The master of Sambia decided to deviate from the stipulated voyage and sailed instead to the Port of Manila because of danger of seizure of goods from the enemies’ port. Compaigne de Commerce sued in the Philippines for damages arising from breach of the charter party and unauthorized sale of the cargo. The issues are as follows: 1)Whether the owners of the ship and the masters thereof is justified in deviating from their route as stipulated in the contract of affreightment because of the risk of seizure of goods by the enemy state. 2) Whether the petitioner is entitled to damages cause by the breach of the charter party The Supreme Court AFFIRMED the decision of the trial court dismissing the complaint, our Supreme Court held that the master of the Sambia had reasonable grounds

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to apprehend that the vessel was in danger of seizure and capture by the French authorities in Saigon and was justified by necessity to elect the course which he took to flee Saigon for the port of Manila with the result that the Ship owner was relieved from liability for damage to the cargo. 1) The danger from the master of the Sambia fled was a real and not merely an imaginary one as counsel for shipper contends. Seizure at the hands of an “enemy of the King” though not inevitable, was a possible outcome of a failure to leave the Port of Saigon; and we cannot say that under the conditions existing at the time when the master elected to flee from that port, there were no grounds for a ‘reasonable apprehension of danger’ from seizure by the French authorities, and therefore no necessity for flight . The word necessity when applied to mercantile affairs where the judgment must in nature of things be exercised cannot of course, mean an irresistible compelling power. What is meant by it in such cases is the force of the circumstances which determine the course a man ought to take. Thus, where by the force of circumstances, a man has the duty cast upon him of taking some action for another, and under that obligation adopts a course which, to the judgment of a wise and prudent man, is apparently the best for the interest for the persons for whom he acts in a given emergency, it may properly be said of the course so taken that it was a in a mercantile sense necessary to take it.” We conclude that under the circumstances surrounding the flight of the Sambia from the port of Saigon, her master had no such assurances, under any well-settled and universally accepted rule of public international law, as to the immunity of his vessel from seizure by the French authorities, as would justify us in holding that it was his duty to remain in the port of Saigon in the hope that he would be allowed to sail for the port of destination designated in the contract of affreightment with a laissez-passer or safeconduct which would secure the safety of his vessel and cargo en route. It is true that soon after the outbreak of the war, the Republic of France authorized and directed the grant of safe-conducts to enemy merchant vessels in its harbors, under certain reasonable regulations and restrictions; so that it would appear that had the master of the Sambia awaited the issuance of such a safe-conduct, he might have been enabled to comply with the terms of his contract of affreightment. But until such action had been taken, the Sambia was exposed to the risk of seizure in the event that the French government should decline to conform to the practice; and in the absence of any assurance in that regard upon which the master could confidently rely, his duty to his owner and to his vessel's flag justified him in fleeing from the danger of seizure in the port of an enemy to the absolute security of a neutral port. 2) Compaigne de Commerce contended that the ship owner should, at all events, be held responsible for the deterioration in the value of the cargo incident to its long stay on board the vessel from the sate of its arrival in manila until the cargo was sold. The Supreme Court, in rejecting this contention also declared that:

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‘But it is clear that the master could not be required to act on the very day of his arrival: or before he had a reasonable opportunity to ascertain whether he could hope to carry out his contract and earn his freight; and that he should not be held responsible for a reasonable delay incident to an effort to ascertain the wishes of the freighter, and upon failure to secure prompt advice, to decide for himself as to the course which he should adopt to secure the interest of the absent owner of the property aboard the vessel. The master is entitled to delay for such period as may be reasonable under the circumstances, before deciding on the course he may adopt. He may claim fair opportunity of carrying out a contract, and earning freight, whether by repairing or transshipping. Should the repair of the ship be undertaken, it must be proceeded with diligently; and if so done, the freighter will have no ground of complaint, although the consequent delay be a long one, unless, indeed, the cargo is perishable, and likely to be injured by the delay. Where that is the case, it ought to be forwarded, or sold, or given up, as the case may be, without waiting for repairs. A ship owner or shipmaster if communication with the ship owner is possible, will be allowed a reasonable time in which to decide what course he will adopt in such cases as those under discussion; time must be allowed to him to ascertain the facts, and to balance the conflicting interest involved, of ship owner, cargo owner, underwriter on ship and freight. But once time has elapsed, he is bound to act promptly according as he has elected either to repair, or abandon the voyage, or transship. If he delays, and owing to that delay a perishable cargo suffers damages, the ship owner will be liable for that damage; he cannot escape that obligation by pleading the absence of definite instructions from the owners of the cargo or their underwriters, since he has control of the cargo and is entitled to elect.

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Chapter 16: International Environmental Law Chapter 17: International Economic Law WIGBERTO E. TAÑADA, ET AL. vs. EDGARDO ANGARA, ET AL. G.R. No. 118295 May 2, 1997 The case is a petition to questioning constitutionality of the WTO-GATT Agreement. On April 15, 1994, Respondent Rizalino Navarro, then Secretary of The Department of Trade and Industry, representing the Government of the Republic of the Philippines, signed in Marrakesh, Morocco, the Final Act Embodying the Results of the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Negotiations. By signing the Final Act, Secretary Navarro on behalf of the Republic of the Philippines, agreed to submit, as appropriate, the WTO Agreement for the consideration of their respective competent authorities, with a view to seeking approval of the Agreement in accordance with their procedures; and to adopt the Ministerial Declarations and Decisions. On August 12, 1994, the members of the Philippine Senate received a letter dated August 11, 1994 from the President of the Philippines, stating among others that "the Uruguay Round Final Act is hereby submitted to the Senate for its concurrence pursuant to Section 21, Article VII of the Constitution." On August 13, 1994, the members of the Philippine Senate received another letter from the President of the Philippines likewise dated August 11, 1994, which stated among others that "the Uruguay Round Final Act, the Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization, the Ministerial Declarations and Decisions, and the Understanding on Commitments in Financial Services are hereby submitted to the Senate for its concurrence pursuant to Section 21, Article VII of the Constitution." On December 9, 1994, the President of the Philippines certified the necessity of the immediate adoption of P.S. 1083, a resolution entitled "Concurring in the Ratification of the Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization." On December 14, 1994, the Philippine Senate adopted Resolution No. 97 which "Resolved, as it is hereby resolved, that the Senate concur, as it hereby concurs, in the ratification by the President of the Philippines of the Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization." On December 16, 1994, the President of the Philippines signed the Instrument of Ratification. The WTO Agreement ratified by the President of the Philippines is composed of the Agreement Proper and "the associated legal instruments included in Annexes one (1), two (2) and three (3) of that Agreement which are integral parts thereof." On the other hand, the Final Act signed by Secretary Navarro embodies not only the WTO Agreement

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(and its integral annexes aforementioned) but also (1) the Ministerial Declarations and Decisions and (2) the Understanding on Commitments in Financial Services. The issues are as follows: I (1) Whether or not the WTO Agreement contravenes the 1987 Philippine Constitution. (2) Whether or not the concurrence of the Senate in the WTO Agreement and its annexes was sufficient and valid, considering that it did not include the Final Act, Ministerial Declarations and Decisions. On the issue of constitutionality, the Court held that while sovereignty has traditionally been deemed absolute and all-encompassing on the domestic level, it is however subject to restrictions and limitations voluntarily agreed to by the Philippines, expressly or impliedly, as a member of the family of nations. Unquestionably, the Constitution did not envision a hermit-type isolation of the country from the rest of the world. In its Declaration of Principles and State Policies, the Constitution "adopts the generally accepted principles of international law as part of the law of the land, and adheres to the policy of peace, equality, justice, freedom, cooperation and amity, with all nations." By the doctrine of incorporation, the country is bound by generally accepted principles of international law, which are considered to be automatically part of our own laws. One of the oldest and most fundamental rules in international law is pacta sunt servanda — international agreements must be performed in good faith. "A treaty engagement is not a mere moral obligation but creates a legally binding obligation on the parties . . . A state which has contracted valid international obligations is bound to make in its legislations such modifications as may be necessary to ensure the fulfillment of the obligations undertaken." The Philippines has effectively agreed to limit the exercise of its sovereign powers of taxation, eminent domain and police power in treaties prior to the WTOGATT. The underlying consideration in this partial surrender of sovereignty is the reciprocal commitment of the other contracting states in granting the same privilege and immunities to the Philippines, its officials and its citizens. The same reciprocity characterizes the Philippine commitments under WTO-GATT. The point is that, as shown by the foregoing treaties, a portion of sovereignty may be waived without violating the Constitution, based on the rationale that the Philippines "adopts the generally accepted principles of international law as part of the law of the land and adheres to the policy of . . . cooperation and amity with all nations. On the issue of the sufficiency and validity of the Senate concurrence, the Court held that the Senate, after deliberation and voting, voluntarily and overwhelmingly gave its consent to the WTO Agreement thereby making it "a part of the law of the land". Ineludibly, what the Senate did was a valid exercise of its authority. As to whether such exercise was wise, beneficial or viable is outside the realm of judicial inquiry and review. That is a matter between the elected policy makers and the people. As to whether the

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nation should join the worldwide march toward trade liberalization and economic globalization is a matter that our people should determine in electing their policy makers. After all, the WTO Agreement allows withdrawal of membership, should this be the political desire of a member. Based on the foregoing, the petition was DISMISSED

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